296-62-07531  <<  296-62-07540 >>   296-62-07542

WAC 296-62-07540

Formaldehyde.

Note:
The requirements in this chapter apply only to agriculture. The general industry requirements relating to formaldehyde have been moved to chapter 296-856 WAC, Formaldehyde.
(1) Scope and application. This standard applies to all occupational exposures to formaldehyde, i.e., from formaldehyde gas, its solutions, and materials that release formaldehyde.
(2) Definitions. For purposes of this standard, the following definitions shall apply:
(a) Action level. A concentration of 0.5 part formaldehyde per million parts of air (0.5 ppm) calculated as an 8-hour time-weighted average (TWA) concentration.
(b) Approved. Approved by the director of the department of labor and industries or their authorized representative: Provided, however, That should a provision of this chapter state that approval by an agency or organization other than the department of labor and industries is required, such as Underwriters' Laboratories or the Mine Safety and Health Administration and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, the provision of WAC 296-800-370 shall apply.
(c) Authorized person. Any person required by work duties to be present in regulated work areas, or authorized to do so by the employer, by this section of the standard, or by the WISHA Act.
(d) Director. The director of the department of labor and industries, or their designated representative.
(e) Emergency. Any occurrence, such as but not limited to equipment failure, rupture of containers, or failure of control equipment that results in an uncontrolled release of a significant amount of formaldehyde.
(f) Employee exposure. The exposure to airborne formaldehyde which would occur without corrections for protection provided by any respirator that is in use.
(g) Formaldehyde. The chemical substance, HCHO, Chemical Abstracts Service Registry No. 50-00-0.
(3) Permissible exposure limit (PEL).
(a) TWA: The employer must ensure that no employee is exposed to an airborne concentration of formaldehyde which exceeds 0.75 part formaldehyde per million parts of air as an 8-hour TWA.
(b) Short term exposure limit (STEL): The employer must ensure that no employee is exposed to an airborne concentration of formaldehyde which exceeds two parts formaldehyde per million parts of air (2 ppm) as a fifteen-minute STEL.
(4) Exposure monitoring.
(a) General.
(i) Each employer who has a workplace covered by this standard must monitor employees to determine their exposure to formaldehyde.
(ii) Exception. Where the employer documents, using objective data, that the presence of formaldehyde or formaldehyde-releasing products in the workplace cannot result in airborne concentrations of formaldehyde that would cause any employee to be exposed at or above the action level or the STEL under foreseeable conditions of use, the employer will not be required to measure employee exposure to formaldehyde.
(iii) When an employee's exposure is determined from representative sampling, the measurements used must be representative of the employee's full shift or short-term exposure to formaldehyde, as appropriate.
(iv) Representative samples for each job classification in each work area must be taken for each shift unless the employer can document with objective data that exposure levels for a given job classification are equivalent for different workshifts.
(b) Initial monitoring. The employer must identify all employees who may be exposed at or above the action level or at or above the STEL and accurately determine the exposure of each employee so identified.
(i) Unless the employer chooses to measure the exposure of each employee potentially exposed to formaldehyde, the employer must develop a representative sampling strategy and measure sufficient exposures within each job classification for each workshift to correctly characterize and not underestimate the exposure of any employee within each exposure group.
(ii) The initial monitoring process must be repeated each time there is a change in production, equipment, process, personnel, or control measures which may result in new or additional exposure to formaldehyde.
(iii) If the employer receives reports or signs or symptoms of respiratory or dermal conditions associated with formaldehyde exposure, the employer must promptly monitor the affected employee's exposure.
(c) Periodic monitoring.
(i) The employer must periodically measure and accurately determine exposure to formaldehyde for employees shown by the initial monitoring to be exposed at or above the action level or at or above the STEL.
(ii) If the last monitoring results reveal employee exposure at or above the action level, the employer must repeat monitoring of the employees at least every six months.
(iii) If the last monitoring results reveal employee exposure at or above the STEL, the employer must repeat monitoring of the employees at least once a year under worst conditions.
(d) Termination of monitoring. The employer may discontinue periodic monitoring for employees if results from two consecutive sampling periods taken at least seven days apart show that employee exposure is below the action level and the STEL. The results must be statistically representative and consistent with the employer's knowledge of the job and work operation.
(e) Accuracy of monitoring. Monitoring must be accurate, at the ninety-five percent confidence level, to within plus or minus twenty-five percent for airborne concentrations of formaldehyde at the TWA and the STEL and to within plus or minus thirty-five percent for airborne concentrations of formaldehyde at the action level.
(f) Employee notification of monitoring results. Within fifteen days of receiving the results of exposure monitoring conducted under this standard, the employer must notify the affected employees of these results. Notification must be in writing, either by distributing copies of the results to the employees or by posting the results. If the employee exposure is over either PEL, the employer must develop and implement a written plan to reduce employee exposure to or below both PELs, and give written notice to employees. The written notice must contain a description of the corrective action being taken by the employer to decrease exposure.
(g) Observation of monitoring.
(i) The employer must provide affected employees or their designated representatives an opportunity to observe any monitoring of employee exposure to formaldehyde required by this standard.
(ii) When observation of the monitoring of employee exposure to formaldehyde requires entry into an area where the use of protective clothing or equipment is required, the employer must provide the clothing and equipment to the observer, require the observer to use such clothing and equipment, and ensure that the observer complies with all other applicable safety and health procedures.
(5) Regulated areas.
(a) The employer must establish regulated areas where the concentration of airborne formaldehyde exceeds either the TWA or the STEL and post all entrances and accessways with signs bearing the following information:
DANGER
FORMALDEHYDE
IRRITANT AND POTENTIAL CANCER HAZARD
AUTHORIZED PERSONNEL ONLY
(b) The employer must limit access to regulated areas to authorized persons who have been trained to recognize the hazards of formaldehyde.
(c) An employer at a multiemployer worksite who establishes a regulated area must communicate the access restrictions and locations of these areas to other employers with work operations at that worksite.
(6) Methods of compliance.
(a) Engineering controls and work practices. The employer must institute engineering and work practice controls to reduce and maintain employee exposures to formaldehyde at or below the TWA and the STEL.
(b) Exception. Whenever the employer has established that feasible engineering and work practice controls cannot reduce employee exposure to or below either of the PELs, the employer must apply these controls to reduce employee exposures to the extent feasible and must supplement them with respirators which satisfy this standard.
(7) Respiratory protection.
(a) General. For employees who use respirators required by this section, the employer must provide respirators that comply with the requirements of this subsection. Respirators must be used during:
(i) Periods necessary to install or implement feasible engineering and work-practice controls;
(ii) Work operations, such as maintenance and repair activities or vessel cleaning, for which the employer establishes that engineering and work-practice controls are not feasible;
(iii) Work operations for which feasible engineering and work-practice controls are not yet sufficient to reduce exposure to or below the PELs;
(iv) Emergencies.
(b) Respirator program.
(i) The employer must implement a respiratory protection program as required by chapter 296-842 WAC, except WAC 296-842-13005 and 296-842-14005.
(ii) If air-purifying chemical-cartridge respirators are used, the employer must:
(A) Replace the cartridge after three hours of use or at the end of the workshift, whichever occurs first, unless the cartridge contains a NIOSH-certified end-of-service-life indicator (ESLI) to show when breakthrough occurs.
(B) Unless the canister contains a NIOSH-certified ESLI to show when breakthrough occurs, replace canisters used in atmospheres up to 7.5 ppm (10 x PEL) every four hours and industrial-sized canisters used in atmospheres up to 75 ppm (100 x PEL) every two hours, or at the end of the workshift, whichever occurs first.
(c) Respirator selection.
(i) The employer must select appropriate respirators from Table 1 of this section.
TABLE 1
MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS FOR RESPIRATORY PROTECTION AGAINST FORMALDEHYDE
Condition of use
or formaldehyde
concentration (ppm)
Minimum respirator required1
Up to 7.5
ppm (10 x PEL) . . . .
Full facepiece with cartridges or canisters specifically approved for protection against formaldehyde2.
Up to 75
ppm (100 x PEL). . . .
Full-face mask with chin style or chest or back mounted type industrial size canister specifically approved for protection against formaldehyde.
 
Type C supplied-air respirator pressure demand or continuous flow type, with full facepiece, hood, or helmet.
Above 75 ppm or
unknown (emergencies)
(100 x PEL). . . .
Self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) with positive-pressure full facepiece.
 
Combination supplied-air, full facepiece positive-pressure respirator with auxiliary self-contained air supply.
Firefighting. . . .
SCBA with positive-pressure in full facepiece.
Escape. . . .
SCBA in demand or pressure demand mode.
 
Full-face mask with chin style or front or back mounted type industrial size canister specifically approved for protection against formaldehyde.
1
Respirators specified for use at higher concentrations may be used at lower concentrations.
2
A half-mask respirator with cartridges specifically approved for protection against formaldehyde can be substituted for the full facepiece respirator providing that effective gas-proof goggles are provided and used in combination with the half-mask respirator.
(ii) The employer must provide a powered air-purifying respirator adequate to protect against formaldehyde exposure to any employee who has difficulty using a negative-pressure respirator.
(8) Protective equipment and clothing. Employers must comply with the provisions of WAC 296-800-160. When protective equipment or clothing is provided under these provisions, the employer must provide these protective devices at no cost to the employee and ensure that the employee wears them.
(a) Selection. The employer must select protective clothing and equipment based upon the form of formaldehyde to be encountered, the conditions of use, and the hazard to be prevented.
(i) All contact of the eyes and skin with liquids containing one percent or more formaldehyde must be prevented by the use of chemical protective clothing made of material impervious to formaldehyde and the use of other personal protective equipment, such as goggles and face shields, as appropriate to the operation.
(ii) Contact with irritating or sensitizing materials must be prevented to the extent necessary to eliminate the hazard.
(iii) Where a face shield is worn, chemical safety goggles are also required if there is a danger of formaldehyde reaching the area of the eye.
(iv) Full body protection must be worn for entry into areas where concentrations exceed 100 ppm and for emergency reentry into areas of unknown concentration.
(b) Maintenance of protective equipment and clothing.
(i) The employer must ensure that protective equipment and clothing that has become contaminated with formaldehyde is cleaned or laundered before its reuse.
(ii) When ventilating formaldehyde-contaminated clothing and equipment, the employer must establish a storage area so that employee exposure is minimized. Containers for contaminated clothing and equipment and storage areas must have labels and signs containing the following information:
DANGER
FORMALDEHYDE-CONTAMINATED (CLOTHING) EQUIPMENT
AVOID INHALATION AND SKIN CONTACT
(iii) The employer must ensure that only persons trained to recognize the hazards of formaldehyde remove the contaminated material from the storage area for purposes of cleaning, laundering, or disposal.
(iv) The employer must ensure that no employee takes home equipment or clothing that is contaminated with formaldehyde.
(v) The employer must repair or replace all required protective clothing and equipment for each affected employee as necessary to assure its effectiveness.
(vi) The employer must inform any person who launders, cleans, or repairs such clothing or equipment of formaldehyde's potentially harmful effects and of procedures to safely handle the clothing and equipment.
(9) Hygiene protection.
(a) The employer shall provide change rooms, as described in WAC 296-800-230 for employees who are required to change from work clothing into protective clothing to prevent skin contact with formaldehyde.
(b) If employees' skin may become splashed with solutions containing one percent or greater formaldehyde, for example because of equipment failure or improper work practices, the employer must provide conveniently located quick drench showers and ensure that affected employees use these facilities immediately.
(c) If there is any possibility that an employee's eyes may be splashed with solutions containing 0.1 percent or greater formaldehyde, the employer must provide acceptable eyewash facilities within the immediate work area for emergency use.
(10) Housekeeping. For operations involving formaldehyde liquids or gas, the employer must conduct a program to detect leaks and spills, including regular visual inspections.
(a) Preventative maintenance of equipment, including surveys for leaks, shall be undertaken at regular intervals.
(b) In work areas where spillage may occur, the employer must make provisions to contain the spill, to decontaminate the work area, and to dispose of the waste.
(c) The employer must ensure that all leaks are repaired and spills are cleaned promptly by employees wearing suitable protective equipment and trained in proper methods for cleanup and decontamination.
(d) Formaldehyde-contaminated waste and debris resulting from leaks or spills must be placed for disposal in sealed containers bearing a label warning of formaldehyde's presence and of the hazards associated with formaldehyde.
(11) Emergencies. For each workplace where there is the possibility of an emergency involving formaldehyde, the employer must ensure appropriate procedures are adopted to minimize injury and loss of life. Appropriate procedures must be implemented in the event of an emergency.
(12) Medical surveillance.
(a) Employees covered.
(i) The employer must institute medical surveillance programs for all employees exposed to formaldehyde at concentrations at or exceeding the action level or exceeding the STEL.
(ii) The employer must make medical surveillance available for employees who develop signs and symptoms of overexposure to formaldehyde and for all employees exposed to formaldehyde in emergencies. When determining whether an employee may be experiencing signs and symptoms of possible overexposure to formaldehyde, the employer may rely on the evidence that signs and symptoms associated with formaldehyde exposure will occur only in exceptional circumstances when airborne exposure is less than 0.1 ppm and when formaldehyde is present in materials in concentrations less than 0.1 percent.
(b) Examination by a physician. All medical procedures, including administration of medical disease questionnaires, must be performed by or under the supervision of a licensed physician and shall be provided without cost to the employee, without loss of pay, and at a reasonable time and place.
(c) Medical disease questionnaire. The employer must make the following medical surveillance available to employees prior to assignment to a job where formaldehyde exposure is at or above the action level or above the STEL and annually thereafter. The employer must also make the following medical surveillance available promptly upon determining that an employee is experiencing signs and symptoms indicative of possible overexposure to formaldehyde.
(i) Administration of a medical disease questionnaire, such as in Appendix D, which is designed to elicit information on work history, smoking history, any evidence of eye, nose, or throat irritation; chronic airway problems or hyperreactive airway disease; allergic skin conditions or dermatitis; and upper or lower respiratory problems.
(ii) A determination by the physician, based on evaluation of the medical disease questionnaire, of whether a medical examination is necessary for employees not required to wear respirators to reduce exposure to formaldehyde.
(d) Medical examinations. Medical examinations must be given to any employee who the physician feels, based on information in the medical disease questionnaire, may be at increased risk from exposure to formaldehyde and at the time of initial assignment and at least annually thereafter to all employees required to wear a respirator to reduce exposure to formaldehyde. The medical examination must include:
(i) A physical examination with emphasis on evidence of irritation or sensitization of the skin and respiratory system, shortness of breath, or irritation of the eyes.
(ii) Laboratory examinations for respirator wearers consisting of baseline and annual pulmonary function tests. As a minimum, these tests must consist of forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), and forced expiratory flow (FEF).
(iii) Any other test which the examining physician deems necessary to complete the written opinion.
(iv) Counseling of employees having medical conditions that would be directly or indirectly aggravated by exposure to formaldehyde on the increased risk of impairment of their health.
(e) Examinations for employees exposed in an emergency. The employer must make medical examinations available as soon as possible to all employees who have been exposed to formaldehyde in an emergency.
(i) The examination must include a medical and work history with emphasis on any evidence of upper or lower respiratory problems, allergic conditions, skin reaction or hypersensitivity, and any evidence of eye, nose, or throat irritation.
(ii) Other examinations must consist of those elements considered appropriate by the examining physician.
(f) Information provided to the physician. The employer must provide the following information to the examining physician:
(i) A copy of this standard and Appendices A, C, D, and E;
(ii) A description of the affected employee's job duties as they relate to the employee's exposure to formaldehyde;
(iii) The representative exposure level for the employee's job assignment;
(iv) Information concerning any personal protective equipment and respiratory protection used or to be used by the employee; and
(v) Information from previous medical examinations of the affected employee within the control of the employer.
(vi) In the event of a nonroutine examination because of an emergency, the employer must provide to the physician as soon as possible: A description of how the emergency occurred and the exposure the victim may have received.
(g) Physician's written opinion.
(i) For each examination required under this standard, the employer shall obtain a written opinion from the examining physician. This written opinion must contain the results of the medical examination except that it must not reveal specific findings or diagnoses unrelated to occupational exposure to formaldehyde. The written opinion must include:
(A) The physician's opinion as to whether the employee has any medical condition that would place the employee at an increased risk of material impairment of health from exposure to formaldehyde;
(B) Any recommended limitations on the employee's exposure or changes in the use of personal protective equipment, including respirators;
(C) A statement that the employee has been informed by the physician of any medical conditions which would be aggravated by exposure to formaldehyde, whether these conditions may have resulted from past formaldehyde exposure or from exposure in an emergency, and whether there is a need for further examination or treatment.
(ii) The employer must provide for retention of the results of the medical examination and tests conducted by the physician.
(iii) The employer must provide a copy of the physician's written opinion to the affected employee within fifteen days of its receipt.
(h) Medical removal.
(i) The provisions of this subdivision apply when an employee reports significant irritation of the mucosa of the eyes or of the upper airways, respiratory sensitization, dermal irritation, or dermal sensitization attributed to workplace formaldehyde exposure. Medical removal provisions do not apply in case of dermal irritation or dermal sensitization when the product suspected of causing the dermal condition contains less than 0.05% formaldehyde.
(ii) An employee's report of signs or symptoms of possible overexposure to formaldehyde must be evaluated by a physician selected by the employer pursuant to (c) of this subsection. If the physician determines that a medical examination is not necessary under (c)(ii) of this subsection, there must be a two-week evaluation and remediation period to permit the employer to ascertain whether the signs or symptoms subside untreated or with the use of creams, gloves, first-aid treatment, or personal protective equipment. Industrial hygiene measures that limit the employee's exposure to formaldehyde may also be implemented during this period. The employee must be referred immediately to a physician prior to expiration of the two-week period if the signs or symptoms worsen. Earnings, seniority, and benefits may not be altered during the two-week period by virtue of the report.
(iii) If the signs or symptoms have not subsided or been remedied by the end of the two-week period, or earlier if signs or symptoms warrant, the employee must be examined by a physician selected by the employer. The physician must presume, absent contrary evidence, that observed dermal irritation or dermal sensitization are not attributable to formaldehyde when products to which the affected employee is exposed contain less than 0.1% formaldehyde.
(iv) Medical examinations must be conducted in compliance with the requirements of (e)(i) and (ii) of this subsection. Additional guidelines for conducting medical exams are contained in WAC 296-62-07546, Appendix C.
(v) If the physician finds that significant irritation of the mucosa of the eyes or the upper airways, respiratory sensitization, dermal irritation, or dermal sensitization result from workplace formaldehyde exposure and recommends restrictions or removal. The employer must promptly comply with the restrictions or recommendations of removal. In the event of a recommendation of removal, the employer must remove the affected employee from the current formaldehyde exposure and if possible, transfer the employee to work having no or significantly less exposure to formaldehyde.
(vi) When an employee is removed pursuant to item (v) of this subdivision, the employer must transfer the employee to comparable work for which the employee is qualified or can be trained in a short period (up to six months), where the formaldehyde exposures are as low as possible, but not higher than the action level. The employer must maintain the employee's current earnings, seniority, and other benefits. If there is no such work available, the employer must maintain the employee's current earnings, seniority, and other benefits until such work becomes available, until the employee is determined to be unable to return to workplace formaldehyde exposure, until the employee is determined to be able to return to the original job status, or for six months, whichever comes first.
(vii) The employer must arrange for a follow-up medical examination to take place within six months after the employee is removed pursuant to this subsection. This examination must determine if the employee can return to the original job status, or if the removal is to be permanent. The physician must make a decision within six months of the date the employee was removed as to whether the employee can be returned to the original job status, or if the removal is to be permanent.
(viii) An employer's obligation to provide earnings, seniority, and other benefits to a removed employee may be reduced to the extent that the employee receives compensation for earnings lost during the period of removal either from a publicly or employer-funded compensation program or from employment with another employer made possible by virtue of the employee's removal.
(ix) In making determinations of the formaldehyde content of materials under this subsection the employer may rely on objective data.
(i) Multiple physician review.
(i) After the employer selects the initial physician who conducts any medical examination or consultation to determine whether medical removal or restriction is appropriate, the employee may designate a second physician to review any findings, determinations, or recommendations of the initial physician and to conduct such examinations, consultations, and laboratory tests as the second physician deems necessary and appropriate to evaluate the effects of formaldehyde exposure and to facilitate this review.
(ii) The employer must promptly notify an employee of the right to seek a second medical opinion after each occasion that an initial physician conducts a medical examination or consultation for the purpose of medical removal or restriction.
(iii) The employer may condition its participation in, and payment for, the multiple physician review mechanism upon the employee doing the following within fifteen days after receipt of the notification of the right to seek a second medical opinion, or receipt of the initial physician's written opinion, whichever is later:
(A) The employee informs the employer of the intention to seek a second medical opinion; and
(B) The employee initiates steps to make an appointment with a second physician.
(iv) If the findings, determinations, or recommendations of the second physician differ from those of the initial physician, then the employer and the employee must ensure that efforts are made for the two physicians to resolve the disagreement. If the two physicians are unable to quickly resolve their disagreement, then the employer and the employee through their respective physicians must designate a third physician who must be a specialist in the field at issue:
(A) To review the findings, determinations, or recommendations of the prior physicians; and
(B) To conduct such examinations, consultations, laboratory tests, and discussions with prior physicians as the third physician deems necessary to resolve the disagreement of the prior physicians.
(v) In the alternative, the employer and the employee or authorized employee representative may jointly designate such third physician.
(vi) The employer must act consistent with the findings, determinations, and recommendations of the third physician, unless the employer and the employee reach an agreement which is otherwise consistent with the recommendations of at least one of the three physicians.
(13) Hazard communication.
(a) General. Notwithstanding any exemption granted in WAC 296-901-140 for wood products, each employer who has a workplace covered by this standard must comply with the requirements of WAC 296-901-140. The definitions of the hazard communication standard shall apply under this standard.
(i) The following shall be subject to the hazard communication requirements of this section: Formaldehyde gas, all mixtures or solutions composed of greater than 0.1 percent formaldehyde, and materials capable of releasing formaldehyde into the air under reasonably foreseeable concentrations reaching or exceeding 0.1 ppm.
(ii) As a minimum, specific health hazards that the employer must address are: Cancer, irritation and sensitization of the skin and respiratory system, eye and throat irritation, and acute toxicity.
(b) Manufacturers and importers who produce or import formaldehyde or formaldehyde-containing products must provide downstream employers using or handling these products with an objective determination through the required labels and SDSs as required by WAC 296-901-140.
(c) Labels.
(i) The employer must ensure that hazard warning labels complying with the requirements of WAC 296-901-140 are affixed to all containers of materials listed in (a)(i) of this subsection, except to the extent that (a)(i) of this subsection is inconsistent with this item.
(ii) Information on labels. As a minimum, for all materials listed in (a)(i) of this subsection, capable of releasing formaldehyde at levels of 0.1 ppm to 0.5 ppm, labels must identify that the product contains formaldehyde: List the name and address of the responsible party; and state that physical and health hazard information is readily available from the employer and from safety data sheets.
(iii) For materials listed in (a)(i) of this subsection, capable of releasing formaldehyde at levels above 0.5 ppm, labels shall appropriately address all the hazards as defined in WAC 296-901-140, and Appendices A and B, including respiratory sensitization, and must contain the words "Potential Cancer Hazard."
(iv) In making the determinations of anticipated levels of formaldehyde release, the employer may rely on objective data indicating the extent of potential formaldehyde release under reasonably foreseeable conditions of use.
(v) Substitute warning labels. The employer may use warning labels required by other statutes, regulations, or ordinances which impart the same information as the warning statements required by this subitem.
(d) Safety data sheets.
(i) Any employer who uses formaldehyde-containing materials listed in (a)(i) of this subsection must comply with the requirements of WAC 296-901-140 with regard to the development and updating of safety data sheets.
(ii) Manufacturers, importers, and distributors of formaldehyde containing materials listed in (a)(i) of this subsection must ensure that safety data sheets and updated information are provided to all employers purchasing such materials at the time of the initial shipment and at the time of the first shipment after a safety data sheet is updated.
(e) Written hazard communication program. The employer must develop, implement, and maintain at the workplace, a written hazard communication program for formaldehyde exposures in the workplace, which at a minimum describes how the requirements specified in this section for labels and other forms of warning and safety data sheets, and subsection (14) of this section for employee information and training, will be met. Employees in multi-employer workplaces must comply with the requirements of WAC 296-901-140.
(14) Employee information and training.
(a) Participation. The employer must ensure that all employees who are assigned to workplaces where there is a health hazard from formaldehyde participate in a training program, except that where the employer can show, using objective data, that employees are not exposed to formaldehyde at or above 0.1 ppm, the employer is not required to provide training.
(b) Frequency. Employers must provide such information and training to employees at the time of their initial assignment and whenever a new exposure to formaldehyde is introduced into their work area. The training must be repeated at least annually.
(c) Training program. The training program must be conducted in a manner which the employee is able to understand and must include:
(i) A discussion of the contents of this regulation and the contents of the safety data sheet;
(ii) The purpose for and a description of the medical surveillance program required by this standard, including:
(A) A description of the potential health hazards associated with exposure to formaldehyde and a description of the signs and symptoms of exposure to formaldehyde.
(B) Instructions to immediately report to the employer the development of any adverse signs or symptoms that the employee suspects is attributable to formaldehyde exposure.
(iii) Description of operations in the work area where formaldehyde is present and an explanation of the safe work practices appropriate for limiting exposure to formaldehyde in each job;
(iv) The purpose for, proper use of, and limitations of personal protective clothing;
(v) Instructions for the handling of spills, emergencies, and clean-up procedures;
(vi) An explanation of the importance of engineering and work practice controls for employee protection and any necessary instruction in the use of these controls;
(vii) A review of emergency procedures including the specific duties or assignments of each employee in the event of an emergency; and
(viii) The purpose, proper use, limitations, and other training requirements for respiratory protection as required by chapter 296-842 WAC.
(d) Access to training materials.
(i) The employer must inform all affected employees of the location of written training materials and must make these materials readily available, without cost, to the affected employees.
(ii) The employer must provide, upon request, all training materials relating to the employee training program to the director of labor and industries, or his/her designated representative.
(15) Recordkeeping.
(a) Exposure measurements. The employer must establish and maintain an accurate record of all measurements taken to monitor employee exposure to formaldehyde. This record must include:
(i) The date of measurement;
(ii) The operation being monitored;
(iii) The methods of sampling and analysis and evidence of their accuracy and precision;
(iv) The number, durations, time, and results of samples taken;
(v) The types of protective devices worn; and
(vi) The names, job classifications, Social Security numbers, and exposure estimates of the employees whose exposures are represented by the actual monitoring results.
(b) Exposure determinations. Where the employer has determined that no monitoring is required under this standard, the employer must maintain a record of the objective data relied upon to support the determination that no employee is exposed to formaldehyde at or above the action level.
(c) Medical surveillance. The employer must establish and maintain an accurate record for each employee subject to medical surveillance under this standard. This record must include:
(i) The name and Social Security number of the employee;
(ii) The physician's written opinion;
(iii) A list of any employee health complaints that may be related to exposure to formaldehyde; and
(iv) A copy of the medical examination results, including medical disease questionnaires and results of any medical tests required by the standard or mandated by the examining physician.
(d) Record retention. The employer must retain records required by this standard for at least the following periods:
(i) Exposure records and determinations must be kept for at least thirty years; and
(ii) Medical records must be kept for the duration of employment plus thirty years.
(e) Availability of records.
(i) Upon request, the employer must make all records maintained as a requirement of this standard available for examination and copying to the director of labor and industries, or their designated representative.
(ii) The employer must make employee exposure records, including estimates made from representative monitoring and available upon request for examination and copying, to the subject employee, or former employee, and employee representatives in accordance with chapter 296-802 WAC.
(iii) Employee medical records required by this standard must be provided upon request for examination and copying, to the subject employee, or former employee, or to anyone having the specific written consent of the subject employee or former employee in accordance with chapter 296-802 WAC.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, and 49.17.060. WSR 19-01-094, § 296-62-07540, filed 12/18/18, effective 1/18/19. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060 and 29 C.F.R. 1910 Subpart Z. WSR 14-07-086, § 296-62-07540, filed 3/18/14, effective 5/1/14. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060. WSR 06-08-087, § 296-62-07540, filed 4/4/06, effective 9/1/06; WSR 05-03-093, § 296-62-07540, filed 1/18/05, effective 3/1/05; WSR 04-10-026, § 296-62-07540, filed 4/27/04, effective 8/1/04. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, [49.17].050. WSR 02-12-098, § 296-62-07540, filed 6/5/02, effective 8/1/02; WSR 01-11-038, § 296-62-07540, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01; WSR 99-10-071, § 296-62-07540, filed 5/4/99, effective 9/1/99. Statutory Authority: Chapter 49.17 RCW. WSR 94-15-096 (Order 94-07), § 296-62-07540, filed 7/20/94, effective 9/20/94; WSR 92-23-017 (Order 92-13), § 296-62-07540, filed 11/10/92, effective 12/18/92; WSR 91-11-070 (Order 91-01), § 296-62-07540, filed 5/20/91, effective 6/20/91; WSR 90-03-029 (Order 89-20), § 296-62-07540, filed 1/11/90, effective 2/26/90; WSR 88-21-002 (Order 88-23), § 296-62-07540, filed 10/6/88, effective 11/7/88.]
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