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WAC 296-24-93501

Definitions.

Cargo tank. Any container designed to be permanently attached to any motor vehicle or other highway vehicle and in which is to be transported any compressed gas. The term "cargo tank" shall not be construed to include any tank used solely for the purpose of supplying fuel for the propulsion of the vehicle or containers fabricated under specifications for cylinders.
Code. Paragraph U-68, U-69, U-200, or U-201 of section VIII of the Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, 1949 Edition, or section VIII of the Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, 1950, 1952, 1956, 1959, and 1962 Editions; or the Code for Unfired Pressure Vessels for Petroleum Liquids and Gases of the American Petroleum Institute and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (API-ASME), 1951 Edition.
DOT design pressure. The "DOT design pressure" is identical to the term "maximum allowable working pressure" as used in the "code" and is the maximum gage pressure at the top of the tank in its operating position. To determine the minimum permissible thickness of physical characteristics of the different parts of the vessel, the static head of the lading shall be added to the DOT design pressure to determine the thickness of any specific part of the vessel. If vacuum insulation is used, the liquid container shall be designed for a pressure of 15 p.s.i. more than DOT design pressure, plus static head of the lading.
EXCEPTION:
For containers constructed in accordance with paragraph U-68 or U-69 of section VIII of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, 1949 Edition, the maximum allowable working pressure for the purpose of these standards is considered to be 125% of the design pressure as provided in 49 C.F.R. 173.315 of DOT regulations.
DOT regulations. Refers to department of transportation regulations for transportation of explosives and other dangerous articles by land and water in rail freight, express and baggage services and by motor vehicle (highway) and water, including specifications for shipping containers, Code of Federal Regulations, Title 49, Parts 171 to 178.
Flow capacity. The capacity in cubic feet per minute of free air discharged at the required flow rating pressure of a safety relief valve.
Flow rating pressure. The pressure at which a safety relief device is rated for capacity.
Frangible disc. A safety relief device in the form of a disc, usually of metal, which is so held as to close the safety relief device channel under normal conditions. The disc is intended to burst at a predetermined pressure to permit the escape of gas.
Free air or free gas. Air or gas measured at a pressure of 14.7 pounds per square inch absolute and a temperature of 60°F.
Fusible plug. A safety relief device in the form of a plug of suitable low-melting material, usually a metal alloy, which closes the safety relief device channel under normal conditions and is intended to yield or melt at a predetermined temperature to permit the escape of gas.
Portable tank. Any container designed primarily to be temporarily attached to a motor vehicle, other vehicle, railroad car other than tank car, or marine vessel, and equipped with skids, mountings, or accessories to facilitate handling of the container by mechanical means, in which is to be transported any compressed gas. The term "portable tank" shall not be construed to include any cargo tank, any tank car tank or any tank of the DOT-106A and DOT-110A-W type.
Resealing pressure. The pressure at which leakage ceases through a water seal of not over 4 inches on the outlet of the safety relief valve.
Safety relief device. A device intended to prevent rupture of a container under certain conditions of exposure.
Safety relief valve. A safety relief device containing an operating part that is held normally in a position closing the safety relief device channel by spring force and is intended to open and to close at predetermined pressures.
Set pressure. A safety relief valve is the pressure marked on the valve and at which the valve is set to start-to-discharge.
Start-to-discharge pressure. The pressure at which the first bubble appears through a water seal of not over 4 inches on the outlet of the safety relief valve.
Note:
When the nature of the service requires the use of a metal-to-metal seat safety relief valve, with or without secondary sealing means, the start-to-discharge pressure may be considered the pressure at which an audible discharge occurs.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, and 49.17.060. WSR 15-24-100, § 296-24-93501, filed 12/1/15, effective 1/5/16; Order 73-5, § 296-24-93501, filed 5/9/73 and Order 73-4, § 296-24-93501, filed 5/7/73.]
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