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Chapter 246-341 WAC

Last Update: 5/25/21

BEHAVIORAL HEALTH AGENCY LICENSING AND CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS

WAC Sections

BEHAVIORAL HEALTH SERVICES—PURPOSE AND SCOPE
HTMLPDF246-341-0100Behavioral health services—Purpose and scope.
HTMLPDF246-341-0110Behavioral health services—Available certifications.
BEHAVIORAL HEALTH SERVICES—DEFINITIONS
HTMLPDF246-341-0200Behavioral health services—Definitions.
BEHAVIORAL HEALTH SERVICES—AGENCY LICENSURE AND CERTIFICATION
HTMLPDF246-341-0300Agency licensure and certification—General information.
HTMLPDF246-341-0302Agency licensure and certification—Exemptions and alternative means or methods.
HTMLPDF246-341-0310Agency licensure and certification—Deeming.
HTMLPDF246-341-0320Agency licensure and certification—On-site reviews and plans of correction.
HTMLPDF246-341-0335Agency licensure and certification—Denials, suspensions, revocations, and penalties.
HTMLPDF246-341-0342Agency licensure and certification—Off-site locations.
HTMLPDF246-341-0365Agency licensure and certification—Fee requirements.
HTMLPDF246-341-0367Agency licensure and certification—Fee requirements for tribal attestations.
HTMLPDF246-341-0370Agency licensure and certification—Appealing a department decision.
BEHAVIORAL HEALTH SERVICES—AGENCY ADMINISTRATION
HTMLPDF246-341-0400Agency administration—Governing body requirements.
HTMLPDF246-341-0410Agency administration—Administrator key responsibilities.
HTMLPDF246-341-0420Agency policies and procedures.
HTMLPDF246-341-0425Agency administration—Individual clinical record system.
BEHAVIORAL HEALTH SERVICES—PERSONNEL
HTMLPDF246-341-0510Personnel—Agency record requirements.
HTMLPDF246-341-0515Personnel—Agency staff requirements.
HTMLPDF246-341-0520Personnel—Agency requirements for supervision of trainees, interns, volunteers, and students.
BEHAVIORAL HEALTH SERVICES—CLINICAL
HTMLPDF246-341-0600Clinical—Individual rights.
HTMLPDF246-341-0605Complaint process.
HTMLPDF246-341-0640Clinical record content.
HTMLPDF246-341-0650Clinical—Access to clinical records.
OUTPATIENT AND RECOVERY SUPPORT SERVICES
HTMLPDF246-341-0700Outpatient and recovery support services—General.
HTMLPDF246-341-0702Outpatient services—Individual mental health treatment services.
HTMLPDF246-341-0704Outpatient services—Brief mental health intervention treatment services.
HTMLPDF246-341-0706Outpatient services—Group mental health therapy services.
HTMLPDF246-341-0708Outpatient services—Family therapy mental health services.
HTMLPDF246-341-0710Outpatient services—Rehabilitative case management mental health services.
HTMLPDF246-341-0712Outpatient services—Psychiatric medication management services.
HTMLPDF246-341-0713Outpatient services—Medication monitoring services.
HTMLPDF246-341-0714Outpatient services—Day support mental health services.
HTMLPDF246-341-0718Recovery support services—Recovery support—General.
HTMLPDF246-341-0720Outpatient services—Recovery support—Supported employment mental health and substance use disorder services.
HTMLPDF246-341-0722Outpatient services—Recovery support—Supportive housing mental health and substance use disorder services.
HTMLPDF246-341-0724Outpatient services—Recovery support—Peer support behavioral health services.
HTMLPDF246-341-0725Recovery support services—Recovery support—Mental health peer respite.
HTMLPDF246-341-0728Outpatient services—Recovery support—Applied behavior analysis mental health services.
HTMLPDF246-341-0730Outpatient services—Consumer-run recovery support—Clubhouses.
HTMLPDF246-341-0738Outpatient services—Level one outpatient substance use disorder services.
HTMLPDF246-341-0740Outpatient services—Level two intensive outpatient substance use disorder services.
HTMLPDF246-341-0742Outpatient services—Substance use disorder assessment only services.
HTMLPDF246-341-0744Outpatient services—Information and assistance services—Substance use disorder services—General.
HTMLPDF246-341-0746Outpatient services—Substance use disorder information and assistance services—Alcohol and drug information school.
HTMLPDF246-341-0748Outpatient services—Substance use disorder information and assistance—Information and crisis services.
HTMLPDF246-341-0750Outpatient services—Substance use disorder information and assistance—Emergency service patrol.
HTMLPDF246-341-0754Outpatient services—Problem gambling and gambling disorder services.
INVOLUNTARY AND COURT-ORDERED OUTPATIENT TREATMENT
HTMLPDF246-341-0800Involuntary and court-ordered—Noncompliance reporting for outpatient court-ordered substance use disorder treatment.
HTMLPDF246-341-0805Involuntary and court-ordered—Outpatient less restrictive alternative (LRA) or conditional release support behavioral health services.
HTMLPDF246-341-0810Involuntary and court-ordered—Designated crisis responder (DCR) services.
HTMLPDF246-341-0815Involuntary and court-ordered—Substance use disorder counseling for RCW 46.61.5056.
HTMLPDF246-341-0820Involuntary and court-ordered—Driving under the influence (DUI) substance use disorder assessment services.
CRISIS OUTPATIENT MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES
HTMLPDF246-341-0900Crisis mental health services—General.
HTMLPDF246-341-0905Crisis mental health services—Telephone support services.
HTMLPDF246-341-0910Crisis mental health services—Outreach services.
HTMLPDF246-341-0915Crisis mental health services—Stabilization services.
OPIOID TREATMENT PROGRAMS (OTP)
HTMLPDF246-341-1000Opioid treatment programs (OTP)—General.
HTMLPDF246-341-1005Opioid treatment programs (OTP)—Agency certification requirements.
HTMLPDF246-341-1010Opioid treatment programs (OTP)—Agency staff requirements.
HTMLPDF246-341-1015Opioid treatment programs (OTP)—Clinical record content and documentation requirements.
HTMLPDF246-341-1020Opioid treatment programs (OTP)—Medical director responsibility.
HTMLPDF246-341-1025Opioid treatment programs (OTP)—Medication management.
GENERAL REQUIREMENTS THAT APPLY TO RESIDENTIAL AND INPATIENT SERVICES
HTMLPDF246-341-1050General requirements for mental health and substance use disorder inpatient and residential services.
HTMLPDF246-341-1060General requirements for mental health and substance use disorder inpatient and residential services providing services under chapter 71.05 or 71.34 RCW.
HTMLPDF246-341-1070Inpatient and residential substance use disorder services—General.
WITHDRAWAL MANAGEMENT, RESIDENTIAL SUBSTANCE USE DISORDER, AND MENTAL HEALTH INPATIENT SERVICES
HTMLPDF246-341-1100Withdrawal management services.
HTMLPDF246-341-1104Secure withdrawal management and stabilization services.
HTMLPDF246-341-1108Residential substance use disorder treatment services—General.
HTMLPDF246-341-1110Residential substance use disorder treatment services—Intensive inpatient services.
HTMLPDF246-341-1112Residential substance use disorder treatment services—Low intensity (recovery house) residential treatment services.
HTMLPDF246-341-1114Residential substance use disorder treatment services—Long-term treatment services.
HTMLPDF246-341-1118Mental health inpatient services—General.
HTMLPDF246-341-1124Mental health inpatient services—Rights related to antipsychotic medication.
HTMLPDF246-341-1134Mental health inpatient services—Evaluation and treatment services.
HTMLPDF246-341-1137Behavioral health inpatient services—Intensive behavioral health treatment services.
HTMLPDF246-341-1138Mental health inpatient services—Child long-term inpatient program (CLIP).
HTMLPDF246-341-1140Mental health inpatient services—Crisis stabilization unit and triage.
HTMLPDF246-341-1154Mental health inpatient services—Competency evaluation and restoration.
HTMLPDF246-341-1156Mental health inpatient services—Competency evaluation and restoration—Rights.
HTMLPDF246-341-1158Mental health inpatient services—Competency evaluation and restoration—Seclusion and restraint.
DISPOSITION OF SECTIONS FORMERLY CODIFIED IN THIS TITLE
246-341-0305Agency licensure and certification—Application. [Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-0305, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.] Repealed by WSR 21-12-042, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160 and RCW 71.24.037; chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW.
246-341-0315Agency licensure and certification—Renewals. [Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-0315, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.] Repealed by WSR 21-12-042, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160 and RCW 71.24.037; chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW.
246-341-0325Agency licensure and certification—Approvals and provisional approvals. [Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-0325, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.] Repealed by WSR 21-12-042, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160 and RCW 71.24.037; chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW.
246-341-0330Agency licensure and certification—Effective dates. [Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-0330, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.] Repealed by WSR 21-12-042, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160 and RCW 71.24.037; chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW.
246-341-0340Agency licensure and certification—Adding a branch site. [Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-0340, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.] Repealed by WSR 21-12-042, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160 and RCW 71.24.037; chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW.
246-341-0345Agency licensure and certification—Adding a new service. [Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-0345, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.] Repealed by WSR 21-12-042, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160 and RCW 71.24.037; chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW.
246-341-0350Agency licensure and certification—Change in ownership. [Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-0350, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.] Repealed by WSR 21-12-042, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160 and RCW 71.24.037; chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW.
246-341-0355Agency licensure and certification—Change in location. [Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-0355, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.] Repealed by WSR 21-12-042, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160 and RCW 71.24.037; chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW.
246-341-0360Agency licensure and certification—Facility remodel. [Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-0360, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.] Repealed by WSR 21-12-042, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160 and RCW 71.24.037; chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW.
246-341-0430Agency administration—Treatment facility requirements. [Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-0430, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.] Repealed by WSR 21-12-042, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160 and RCW 71.24.037; chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW.
246-341-0500Personnel—Agency policies and procedures. [Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-0500, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.] Repealed by WSR 21-12-042, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160 and RCW 71.24.037; chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW.
246-341-0610Clinical—Assessment. [Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-0610, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.] Repealed by WSR 21-12-042, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160 and RCW 71.24.037; chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW.
246-341-0620Clinical—Individual service plan. [Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-0620, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.] Repealed by WSR 21-12-042, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160 and RCW 71.24.037; chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW.
246-341-0716Outpatient services—Mental health outpatient services provided in a residential treatment facility (RTF). [Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-0716, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.] Repealed by WSR 21-12-042, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160 and RCW 71.24.037; chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW.
246-341-0726Outpatient services—Recovery support—Wraparound facilitation mental health services. [Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-0726, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.] Repealed by WSR 21-12-042, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160 and RCW 71.24.037; chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW.
246-341-0732Outpatient services—Consumer-run recovery support—Clubhouses—Management and operational requirements. [Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-0732, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.] Repealed by WSR 21-12-042, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160 and RCW 71.24.037; chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW.
246-341-0734Outpatient services—Consumer-run recovery support—Clubhouses—Certification process. [Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-0734, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.] Repealed by WSR 21-12-042, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160 and RCW 71.24.037; chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW.
246-341-0736Outpatient services—Consumer-run recovery support—Clubhouses—Employment-related services. [Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-0736, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.] Repealed by WSR 21-12-042, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160 and RCW 71.24.037; chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW.
246-341-0752Outpatient services—Substance use disorder information and assistance—Screening and brief intervention. [Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-0752, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.] Repealed by WSR 21-12-042, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160 and RCW 71.24.037; chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW.
246-341-0920Crisis mental health services—Peer support services. [Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-0920, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.] Repealed by WSR 21-12-042, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160 and RCW 71.24.037; chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW.
246-341-1102Withdrawal management services—Youth. [Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-1102, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.] Repealed by WSR 21-12-042, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160 and RCW 71.24.037; chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW.
246-341-1106Secure withdrawal management and stabilization services—Youth. [Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-1106, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.] Repealed by WSR 21-12-042, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160 and RCW 71.24.037; chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW.
246-341-1116Residential substance use disorder treatment services—Youth residential services. [Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-1116, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.] Repealed by WSR 21-12-042, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160 and RCW 71.24.037; chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW.
246-341-1120Mental health inpatient services—Posting of individual rights for minors. [Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-1120, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.] Repealed by WSR 21-12-042, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160 and RCW 71.24.037; chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW.
246-341-1122Mental health inpatient services—Rights of individuals receiving inpatient services. [Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-1122, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.] Repealed by WSR 21-12-042, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160 and RCW 71.24.037; chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW.
246-341-1126Mental health inpatient services—Policies and procedures—Adult. [Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-1126, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.] Repealed by WSR 21-12-042, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160 and RCW 71.24.037; chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW.
246-341-1128Mental health inpatient services—Policies and procedures—Minors. [Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-1128, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.] Repealed by WSR 21-12-042, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160 and RCW 71.24.037; chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW.
246-341-1130Mental health inpatient services—Treatment of a minor without consent of parent. [Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-1130, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.] Repealed by WSR 21-12-042, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160 and RCW 71.24.037; chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW.
246-341-1132Mental health inpatient services—Treatment of a minor without consent of minor. [Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-1132, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.] Repealed by WSR 21-12-042, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160 and RCW 71.24.037; chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW.
246-341-1136Mental health inpatient services—Exception—Long-term certification. [Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-1136, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.] Repealed by WSR 20-07-091, filed 3/17/20, effective 5/1/20. Statutory Authority: 2019 c 324, RCW 71.24.037, 71.24.648, and 71.24.649.
246-341-1142Mental health inpatient services—Crisis stabilization unit—Admission, assessment, and records. [Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-1142, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.] Repealed by WSR 21-12-042, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160 and RCW 71.24.037; chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW.
246-341-1144Mental health inpatient services—Triage—Agency facility and administrative requirements. [Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-1144, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.] Repealed by WSR 21-12-042, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160 and RCW 71.24.037; chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW.
246-341-1146Mental health inpatient services—Triage—Admission, assessment, and records. [Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-1146, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.] Repealed by WSR 21-12-042, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160 and RCW 71.24.037; chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW.
246-341-1148Mental health inpatient services—Triage—Stabilization plan. [Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-1148, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.] Repealed by WSR 21-12-042, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160 and RCW 71.24.037; chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW.
246-341-1150Mental health inpatient services—Triage—Discharge. [Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-1150, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.] Repealed by WSR 21-12-042, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160 and RCW 71.24.037; chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW.
246-341-1152Mental health inpatient services—Triage—Involuntary. [Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-1152, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.] Repealed by WSR 21-12-042, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160 and RCW 71.24.037; chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW.


PDF246-341-0100

Behavioral health servicesPurpose and scope.

(1) This chapter establishes state minimum standards for licensed behavioral health agencies.
(2) This chapter does not apply to state psychiatric hospitals as defined in chapter 72.23 RCW or facilities owned or operated by the department of veterans affairs or other agencies of the United States government.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160, 71.24.037 and chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW. WSR 21-12-042, § 246-341-0100, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-0100, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.]



PDF246-341-0110

Behavioral health servicesAvailable certifications.

A behavioral health agency licensed by the department may become certified to provide one or more of the mental health, substance use disorder, and problem gambling and gambling disorder services listed below:
(1) Outpatient and recovery support:
(a) Individual mental health treatment services;
(b) Brief mental health intervention treatment services;
(c) Group mental health therapy services;
(d) Family therapy mental health services;
(e) Rehabilitative case management mental health services;
(f) Psychiatric medication management services;
(g) Medication monitoring services;
(h) Day support mental health services;
(i) Recovery support: Supported employment mental health services;
(j) Recovery support: Supported employment substance use disorder services;
(k) Recovery support: Supportive housing mental health services;
(l) Recovery support: Supportive housing substance use disorder services;
(m) Recovery support: Peer support mental health services;
(n) Recovery support: Peer support substance use disorder services;
(o) Recovery support: Mental health peer respite center;
(p) Recovery support: Applied behavior analysis (ABA) mental health services;
(q) Consumer-run recovery support: Clubhouse mental health services;
(r) Substance use disorder level one outpatient services;
(s) Substance use disorder level two intensive outpatient services;
(t) Substance use disorder assessment only services;
(u) Substance use disorder alcohol and drug information school services;
(v) Substance use disorder information and crisis services;
(w) Substance use disorder emergency service patrol services; and
(x) Problem gambling and gambling disorder services.
(2) Involuntary and court-ordered outpatient services:
(a) Less restrictive alternative (LRA) or conditional release support behavioral health services;
(b) Designated crisis responder (DCR) services;
(c) Substance use disorder counseling services subject to RCW 46.61.5056; and
(d) Driving under the influence (DUI) substance use disorder assessment services.
(3) Crisis mental health services:
(a) Crisis mental health telephone support services;
(b) Crisis mental health outreach services; and
(c) Crisis mental health stabilization services.
(4) Opioid treatment program (OTP) services.
(5) Withdrawal management, residential substance use disorder treatment, and mental health inpatient services:
(a) Withdrawal management facility services:
(i) Withdrawal management services - Adult;
(ii) Withdrawal management services - Youth;
(iii) Secure withdrawal management and stabilization services - Adult; and
(iv) Secure withdrawal management and stabilization services - Youth.
(b) Residential substance use disorder treatment services:
(i) Intensive substance use disorder inpatient services;
(ii) Low-intensity (recovery house) residential treatment services;
(iii) Long-term treatment services; and
(iv) Youth residential services.
(c) Mental health inpatient services:
(i) Evaluation and treatment services - Adult;
(ii) Evaluation and treatment services - Youth;
(iii) Intensive behavioral health treatment services;
(iv) Child long-term inpatient program services;
(v) Crisis stabilization unit services;
(vi) Triage - Involuntary services;
(vii) Triage - Voluntary services; and
(viii) Competency evaluation and restoration treatment services.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160, 71.24.037 and chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW. WSR 21-12-042, § 246-341-0110, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: 2019 c 324, RCW 71.24.037, 71.24.648, and 71.24.649. WSR 20-07-091, § 246-341-0110, filed 3/17/20, effective 5/1/20. Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-0110, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.]



PDF246-341-0200

Behavioral health servicesDefinitions.

The definitions in this section and RCW 71.05.010, 71.24.025, and 71.34.020 apply throughout this chapter unless the context clearly requires otherwise.
(1) "Administrator" means the designated person responsible for the day-to-day operation of either the licensed behavioral health agency, or certified treatment service, or both.
(2) "Adult" means an individual eighteen years of age or older. For purposes of the medicaid program, adult means an individual twenty-one years of age or older.
(3) "ASAM criteria" means admission, continued service, transfer, and discharge criteria for the treatment of substance use disorders as published by the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM).
(4) "Assessment" means the process of obtaining all pertinent bio-psychosocial information, as identified by the individual, and family and collateral sources, for determining a diagnosis and to plan individualized services and supports.
(5) "Behavioral health" means the prevention, treatment of, and recovery from any or all of the following disorders: Substance use disorders, mental health disorders, co-occurring disorders, or problem gambling and gambling disorders.
(6) "Behavioral health agency," "licensed behavioral health agency," or "agency" means an entity licensed by the department to provide behavioral health services under chapter 71.24, 71.05, or 71.34 RCW.
(7) "Branch site" means a physically separate licensed site, governed by the same parent organization as the main site, where qualified staff provides certified treatment services.
(8) "Campus" means an area where all of the agency's buildings are located on contiguous properties undivided by:
(a) Public streets, not including alleyways used primarily for delivery services or parking; or
(b) Other land that is not owned and maintained by the owners of the property on which the agency is located.
(9) "Care coordination" or "coordination of care" means a process-oriented activity to facilitate ongoing communication and collaboration to meet multiple needs of an individual. Care coordination includes facilitating communication between the family, natural supports, community resources, and involved providers and agencies, organizing, facilitating and participating in team meetings, and providing for continuity of care by creating linkages to and managing transitions between levels of care.
(10) "Certified" or "certification" means the status given by the department that authorizes the agency to provide specific substance use disorder, mental health, and problem gambling and gambling disorder program-specific services.
(11) "Child," "minor," and "youth" mean:
(a) An individual under the age of eighteen years; or
(b) An individual age eighteen to twenty-one years who is eligible to receive and who elects to receive an early and periodic screening, diagnostic, and treatment (EPSDT) medicaid service. An individual age eighteen to twenty-one years who receives EPSDT services is not considered a "child" for any other purpose.
(12) "Clinical record" means either a paper, or electronic file, or both that is maintained by the behavioral health agency and contains pertinent psychological, medical, and clinical information for each individual served.
(13) "Clinical supervision" means regular and periodic activities performed by a mental health professional, co-occurring disorder specialist, or substance use disorder professional licensed, certified, or registered under Title 18 RCW. Clinical supervision may include review of assessment, diagnostic formulation, individual service plan development, progress toward completion of care, identification of barriers to care, continuation of services, authorization of care, and the direct observation of the delivery of clinical care. In the context of this chapter, clinical supervision is separate from clinical supervision required for purposes of obtaining supervised hours toward fulfilling requirements related to professional licensure under Title 18 RCW.
(14) "Complaint" means an alleged violation of licensing or certification requirements under chapters 71.05, 71.12, 71.24, 71.34 RCW, and this chapter, which has been authorized by the department for investigation.
(15) "Consent" means agreement given by an individual after being provided with a description of the nature, character, anticipated results of proposed treatments and the recognized serious possible risks, complications, and anticipated benefits, including alternatives and nontreatment, that must be provided in a terminology that the individual can reasonably be expected to understand. Consent can be obtained from an individual's parent or legal representative, when applicable.
(16) "Consultation" means the clinical review and development of recommendations by persons with appropriate knowledge and experience regarding activities or decisions of clinical staff, contracted employees, volunteers, or students.
(17) "Co-occurring disorder" means the coexistence of both a mental health and a substance use disorder. Co-occurring treatment is a unified treatment approach intended to treat both disorders within the context of a primary treatment relationship or treatment setting.
(18) "Cultural competence" or "culturally competent" means the ability to recognize and respond to health-related beliefs and cultural values, disease incidence and prevalence, and treatment efficacy. Examples of culturally competent care include striving to overcome cultural, language, and communications barriers, providing an environment in which individuals from diverse cultural backgrounds feel comfortable discussing their cultural health beliefs and practices in the context of negotiating treatment options, encouraging individuals to express their spiritual beliefs and cultural practices, and being familiar with and respectful of various traditional healing systems and beliefs and, where appropriate, integrating these approaches into treatment plans.
(19) "Deemed" means a status that is given to a licensed behavioral health agency as a result of the agency receiving accreditation by a recognized behavioral health accrediting body which has a current agreement with the department.
(20) "Disability" means a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities of the individual and the individual:
(a) Has a record of such an impairment; or
(b) Is regarded as having such impairment.
(21) "Licensed" or "licensure" means the status given to behavioral health agencies by the department under its authority to license and certify mental health and substance use disorder programs under chapters 71.05, 71.12, 71.34, and 71.24 RCW and its authority to certify problem gambling and gambling disorder treatment programs under RCW 43.20A.890.
(22) "Medical practitioner" means a physician licensed under chapter 18.57 or 18.71 RCW, advance registered nurse practitioner (ARNP) licensed under chapter 18.79 RCW, or physician assistant licensed under chapter 18.71A or 18.57A RCW.
(23) "Mental health disorder" means any organic, mental, or emotional impairment that has substantial adverse effects on a person's cognitive or volitional functions.
(24) "Mental health professional" or "MHP" means a person who meets the qualifications in WAC 246-341-0515(5).
(25) "Peer counselor" means the same as defined in WAC 182-538D-0200.
(26) "Problem gambling and gambling disorder" means one or more of the following disorders:
(a) "Gambling disorder" means a mental disorder characterized by loss of control over gambling, progression in preoccupation with gambling and in obtaining money to gamble, and continuation of gambling despite adverse consequences;
(b) "Problem gambling" is an earlier stage of gambling disorder that compromises, disrupts, or damages family or personal relationships or vocational pursuits.
(27) "Progress notes" means permanent written or electronic record of services and supports provided to an individual documenting the individual's participation in, and response to, treatment, progress in recovery, and progress toward intended outcomes.
(28) "Secretary" means the secretary of the department of health.
(29) "State minimum standards" means minimum requirements established by rules adopted by the secretary and necessary to implement chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW for delivery of behavioral health services.
(30) "Substance use disorder professional" or "SUDP" means a person credentialed by the department as a substance use disorder professional (SUDP) under chapter 18.205 RCW.
(31) "Substance use disorder professional trainee" or "SUDPT" means a person credentialed by the department as a substance use disorder professional trainee (SUDPT) under chapter 18.205 RCW.
(32) "Summary suspension" means the immediate suspension of either a facility's license or program-specific certification or both by the department pending administrative proceedings for suspension, revocation, or other actions deemed necessary by the department.
(33) "Supervision" means the regular monitoring of the administrative, clinical, or clerical work performance of a staff member, trainee, student, volunteer, or employee on contract by a person with the authority to give direction and require change.
(34) "Suspend" means termination of a behavioral health agency's license or program specific certification to provide behavioral health treatment program service for a specified period or until specific conditions have been met and the department notifies the agency of the program's reinstatement of license or certification.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160, 71.24.037 and chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW. WSR 21-12-042, § 246-341-0200, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: 2019 c 324, RCW 71.24.037, 71.24.648, and 71.24.649. WSR 20-07-091, § 246-341-0200, filed 3/17/20, effective 5/1/20. Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-0200, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.]



PDF246-341-0300

Agency licensure and certificationGeneral information.

The department licenses behavioral health agencies and certifies them to provide behavioral health treatment services. To obtain and maintain licensure and certification, an applicant must meet the requirements of this chapter, applicable local and state rules, and applicable state and federal statutes and regulations. In addition, the applicant must meet the applicable specific service requirements for all behavioral health treatment services certified by the department.
The following licensure process in this section does not apply to a tribe that is licensed or seeking licensure via attestation as described in WAC 246-341-0367.
(1) Initial licensure of a behavioral health agency – Main site. The applicant shall submit a licensing application to the department that is signed by the agency's designated official. The application must include the following:
(a) The physical address of the agency;
(b) A list of the specific services for which the applicant is seeking certification;
(c) A statement assuring the location where the services will be provided meets the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) standards and that any agency-operated facility where behavioral health services will be provided is:
(i) Suitable for the purposes intended, including having adequate space for private personal consultation with an individual and clinical record storage that adheres to confidentiality requirements;
(ii) Not a personal residence; and
(iii) Approved as meeting all local and state building and safety requirements, as applicable.
(d) Payment of associated fees according to WAC 246-341-0365;
(e) A copy of the applicant's master business license that authorizes the organization to do business in Washington state;
(f) A copy of the disclosure statement and report of findings from a background check of the administrator completed within the previous three months of the application date; and
(g) A copy of the policies and procedures specific to the agency and the services for which the applicant is seeking certification that address all of the applicable requirements of this chapter.
(2) The department may issue a single agency license when the applicant identifies behavioral health treatment services will be provided in multiple buildings and either:
(a) The applicant operates the multiple buildings on the same campus as a single integrated system with governance by a single authority or body over all staff and buildings; or
(b) All behavioral health treatment services will be provided in buildings covered under a single hospital license.
(3) Initial licensure of a behavioral health agency – Branch site. To add a branch site, an existing behavioral health agency shall meet the application requirements in subsection (1)(a) through (c) of this section and submit to the department:
(a) A written declaration that a current copy of agency policies and procedures that address all of the applicable requirements of this chapter are accessible to the branch site;
(b) A copy of policies and procedures for any behavioral health service that is unique to the branch site location, if applicable; and
(c) A copy of the disclosure statement and report of findings from a background check of the administrator completed within the previous three months of the application date, if the administrator of the branch site is different than the administrator of the main site location.
(4) License renewal.
(a) To renew a main site or branch site license and certification, an agency shall submit to the department a renewal request signed by the agency's designated official. The renewal request must:
(i) Be received by the department before the expiration date of the agency's current license; and
(ii) Include full payment of the specific renewal fee according to WAC 246-341-0365.
(b) The department shall renew an agency's main site or branch site license if all the requirements for renewal are met and the renewal request is received before the expiration date of the agency's current license.
(5) Amending a license. A license amendment is required when there is a change in the administrator, when adding or removing a service, or when closing a location. To amend a license the agency shall submit to the department a licensing application requesting the amendment that is signed by the agency's designated official. The application process shall include the following requirements as applicable to the amendment being requested:
(a) Change of the administrator. The application must include a copy of the disclosure statement and report of findings from a background check of the new administrator completed within the previous three months of the application date and within thirty days of the change;
(b) Adding a service. The application must include:
(i) The physical address or addresses of the agency-operated facility or facilities where the new service(s) will be provided;
(ii) A copy of the agency's policies and procedures relating to the new service(s); and
(iii) Payment of fees according to WAC 246-341-0365.
(c) Canceling a service.
(i) The agency must provide notice to individuals who receive the service(s) to be canceled. The notice shall be provided at least thirty days before the service(s) are canceled and the agency must assist individuals in accessing services at another location.
(ii) The application must include the physical address or addresses of the agency-operated facility or facilities where the service(s) will no longer be provided.
(d) Closing a location.
(i) The application must include the name of the licensed agency or entity storing and managing the records, including:
(A) The method of contact, such as a telephone number, electronic address, or both; and
(B) The mailing and street address where the records will be stored.
(ii) When a closing agency that has provided substance use disorder services arranges for the continued storage and management of clinical records by a qualified service organization (QSO), the closing agency must enter into a written agreement with the QSO that meets the requirements of 42 C.F.R. Part 2.
(iii) In the event of an agency closure the agency must provide each individual currently being served:
(A) Notice of the agency closure at least thirty days before the date of closure;
(B) Assistance with accessing services at another location; and
(C) Information on how to access records to which the individual is entitled.
(6) Change of ownership.
(a) Change of ownership means one of the following:
(i) The ownership of a licensed behavioral health agency changes from one distinct legal owner to another distinct legal owner;
(ii) The type of business changes from one type to another, such as, from a sole proprietorship to a corporation; or
(iii) The current ownership takes on a new owner of five percent or more of the organizational assets.
(b) When a licensed behavioral health agency changes ownership, the department shall require:
(i) An initial license application from the new owner in accordance with subsection (1) of this section. The new agency must receive a new license under the new ownership before providing any behavioral health service; and
(ii) A statement from the current owner regarding the disposition and management of clinical records in accordance with applicable state and federal statutes and regulations.
(7) Change in location. A licensed behavioral health agency must receive a new license under the new location's address before providing any behavioral health service at that address. The agency shall submit to the department a licensing application requesting a change in location that is signed by the agency's designated official. The application must include:
(a) The new address;
(b) A statement assuring the location meets the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) standards and that any agency-operated facility where behavioral health services will be provided is:
(i) Suitable for the purposes intended, including having adequate space for private personal consultation with an individual and clinical record storage that adheres to confidentiality requirements;
(ii) Not a personal residence; and
(iii) Approved as meeting all local and state building and safety requirements, as applicable.
(c) Payment of initial licensure fees.
(8) Granting a license. A new or amended license or service-specific certification will not be granted to an agency until:
(a) All of the applicable notification and application requirements of this section are met; and
(b) The department has reviewed and approved the policies and procedures for initial licensure or addition of new services that demonstrate that the agency will operate in compliance with the licensure and service-specific certification standards.
(9) Effective date. An agency's license and any behavioral health services certification is effective for up to twelve months from the effective date, subject to the agency maintaining compliance with the minimum license and certification standards in this chapter.
(10) After receiving the license. The agency shall post the department-issued license and certification(s) in a conspicuous place on the agency's premises, and, if applicable, on the agency's branch site premises.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160, 71.24.037 and chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW. WSR 21-12-042, § 246-341-0300, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-0300, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.]



PDF246-341-0302

Agency licensure and certificationExemptions and alternative means or methods.

The department may grant an exemption or approve alternative means or methods of compliance from any part of this chapter so long as it does not violate an existing state or federal statute or regulation, or tribal law.
(1) An agency can request an exemption or alternative means or methods of compliance by submitting a written request to the department that includes:
(a) The specific section or sections of rules for which the exemption or alternative means or methods of compliance is requested;
(b) An explanation of the circumstances involved;
(c) A proposed alternative that would ensure the safety, health, and treatment of clients meeting the intent of the rule; and
(d) Any supporting research or other documentation, as applicable.
(2) The department shall approve or deny an exemption or alternative means or methods request in writing and the agency shall keep a copy of the decision for as long as the approval for exemption or alternative means or methods is in place.
(3) Appeal rights under WAC 246-341-0370 do not apply to exemption or alternative means or methods request decisions.
(4) The department may consider granting exemptions to a section or sections of this chapter during a governor declared state of emergency to ensure continued access to behavioral health treatment.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160, 71.24.037 and chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW. WSR 21-12-042, § 246-341-0302, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21.]



PDF246-341-0310

Agency licensure and certificationDeeming.

(1) The department shall deem an agency or branch site as meeting state minimum standards for licensing and certification described in this chapter as a result of accreditation by a national accreditation organization that is recognized by and has a current agreement with the department.
(2) To implement deemed status when opening a new main site agency, adding a new type of service to a main site agency, or adding a new type of service to a branch site location that is not currently offered at the main site agency, an agency must:
(a) Submit proof of accreditation for the services provided by the agency to the department; and
(b) Complete a department initial on-site review.
(3) To implement deemed status when opening a new branch site location that is providing the same services as a deemed main site agency, or a service is being added to a branch site location that is a deemed service at a main site location, an agency must submit proof of accreditation for the services provided by the agency to the department.
(4) The department will not conduct an on-site review as part of the deeming process for tribal behavioral health agencies who seek licensure pursuant to WAC 246-341-0310.
(5) Deeming will be in accordance with the established written agreement between the national accreditation organization and the department.
(6) Specific licensing and certification requirements of any:
(a) State rule may only be waived through a deeming process consistent with the established written agreement between the recognized behavioral health accrediting body and the department.
(b) State or federal statute or regulation will not be waived through a deeming process.
(7) A deemed main site agency or branch site must submit to the department a copy of any relevant reports such as audits, findings, or documentation related to accreditation status.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160, 71.24.037 and chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW. WSR 21-12-042, § 246-341-0310, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-0310, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.]



PDF246-341-0320

Agency licensure and certificationOn-site reviews and plans of correction.

Each agency is subject to an initial on-site review and each agency that is not deemed in accordance with WAC 246-341-0310 is subject to routine, ongoing on-site reviews to determine if the agency is in compliance with the minimum licensure and certification standards.
(1) A department review team representative(s) conducts an entrance conference with the agency and an on-site review that may include:
(a) A review of:
(i) Agency policies and procedures;
(ii) Personnel records;
(iii) Clinical records;
(iv) Facility accessibility;
(v) The agency's internal quality management plan, process, or both, that demonstrates how the agency evaluates program effectiveness and individual participant satisfaction; and
(vi) Any other information, including the criteria in WAC 246-341-0335 (1)(b), that the department determines to be necessary to confirm compliance with the minimum standards of this chapter; and
(b) Interviews with:
(i) Individuals served by the agency; and
(ii) Agency staff members.
(2) The department review team representative(s) concludes an on-site review with an exit conference that includes a discussion of findings.
(3) The department will send the agency a statement of deficiencies report that will include instructions and time frames for submission of a plan of correction.
(4) The department requires the agency to correct the deficiencies listed on the plan of correction:
(a) By the negotiated time frame agreed upon by the agency and the department review team representative; or
(b) Immediately if the department determines health and safety concerns require immediate corrective action.
(5) On-site reviews of branch sites will occur at the same time as the main site review and take place at the main site location so long as the department can access the following either electronically or by hard copies brought to the main site agency location:
(a) Personnel records of employees hired since the previous review;
(b) A sample of individual clinical records that reflect the services provided at each branch site location; and
(c) Policies and procedures that are unique to the services provided at the branch site locations.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160, 71.24.037 and chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW. WSR 21-12-042, § 246-341-0320, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-0320, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.]



PDF246-341-0335

Agency licensure and certificationDenials, suspensions, revocations, and penalties.

(1) The department will deny issuing or renewing an agency's license or specific service certification(s), place an agency on probation, or suspend, or revoke an agency's license or specific service certification for any of the following reasons:
(a) The agency fails to meet requirements in this chapter.
(b) The agency fails to cooperate or disrupts department representatives during an on-site review or complaint investigation.
(c) The agency fails to assist the department in conducting individual interviews with either staff members or individuals receiving services, or both.
(d) The agency owner or governing person of a nonprofit corporation or agency administrator:
(i) Had a license or specific service certification issued by the department subsequently denied, suspended, revoked, or any other sanction placed upon a license;
(ii) Was convicted of child abuse or adjudicated as a perpetrator of a founded child protective services report;
(iii) Was convicted of abuse of a vulnerable adult or adjudicated as a perpetrator of substantiated abuse of a vulnerable adult. A vulnerable adult means the same as defined in chapter 74.34 RCW;
(iv) Obtained or attempted to obtain a health provider license, certification, or registration by fraudulent means or misrepresentation;
(v) Committed, permitted, aided or abetted the committing of an illegal act or unprofessional conduct as defined under RCW 18.130.180;
(vi) Demonstrated cruelty, abuse, negligence, misconduct, or indifference to the welfare of an individual or displayed acts of discrimination;
(vii) Misappropriated patient (individual) property or resources;
(viii) Failed to meet financial obligations or contracted service commitments that affect care of individuals;
(ix) Has a history of noncompliance with state or federal rules in an agency with which the applicant has been affiliated;
(x) Knowingly, or with reason to know, made a false statement of fact or failed to submit necessary information in:
(A) The submitted application or materials attached; or
(B) Any matter under department investigation.
(xi) Refused to allow the department access to view records, files, books, or portions of the premises relating to operation of the program;
(xii) Willfully interfered with the preservation of material information or attempted to impede the work of an authorized department representative;
(xiii) Is currently debarred, suspended, proposed for debarment, declared ineligible, or voluntarily excluded from participating in transactions involving certain federal funds (this also applies to any person or business entity named in the agency's application for licensure or certification);
(xiv) Does not meet background check requirements;
(xv) Fails to provide satisfactory application materials; or
(xvi) Advertises the agency as certified when licensing or certification has not been granted, or has been revoked or canceled.
(e) The department determines there is imminent risk to health and safety.
(f) The agency's licensure or specific service certification is in probationary status and the agency fails to correct the noted health and safety deficiencies within the agreed-upon time frames.
(2) The department may deny issuing or renewing an agency's license or specific service certification(s), place an agency on probation, or suspend or revoke an agency's license or specific service certification(s) for any of the following reasons:
(a) The agency voluntarily cancels licensure or certification(s).
(b) The agency fails to pay the required license or certification fees.
(c) The agency stops providing the services for which the agency is certified.
(d) The agency fails to notify the department before changing ownership.
(e) The agency fails to notify the department before relocating its licensed location.
(3) If the department denies, suspends, revokes, or modifies the agency's license or specific service certification, the department will send a written notice including the reason(s) for the decision and the agency's right to appeal a department decision according to the provisions of RCW 43.70.115, chapter 34.05 RCW, and chapter 246-10 WAC.
(4) The department may summarily suspend an agency's license or specific service certification(s) of a behavioral health service when an immediate danger to the public health, safety, or welfare requires emergency action.
(5) If an agency fails to comply with the requirements of this chapter, the department may:
(a) Assess fees to cover costs of added licensing and service-specific certification activities, including when the department determines a corrective action is required due to a complaint or incident investigation;
(b) Stop referral(s) of an individual who is a service recipient of either a state or federally funded service or both; and
(c) Notify the health care authority and the managed care organization of stopped referrals, suspensions, revocations, or nonrenewal of the agency's license or service-specific certification(s).
[Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160, 71.24.037 and chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW. WSR 21-12-042, § 246-341-0335, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-0335, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.]



PDF246-341-0342

Agency licensure and certificationOff-site locations.

(1) A behavioral health agency that provides outpatient services at an established off-site location(s) shall:
(a) Maintain a list of each established off-site location where services are provided on a regularly scheduled ongoing basis and include, for each established off-site location:
(i) The name and address of the location the services are provided;
(ii) The primary purpose of the off-site location;
(iii) The service(s) provided; and
(iv) The date off-site services began at that location;
(b) Maintain an individual's confidentiality at the off-site location; and
(c) Securely transport confidential information and individual records between the licensed agency and the off-site location, if applicable.
(2) In addition to meeting the requirements in subsection (1) of this section, an agency providing services to an individual in their place of residence or services in a public setting that is not an established off-site location where services are provided on a regularly scheduled ongoing basis must:
(a) Implement and maintain a written protocol of how services will be offered in a manner that promotes individual, staff member, and community safety; and
(b) For the purpose of emergency communication and as required by RCW 71.05.710, provide access to a wireless telephone or comparable device to any employee, contractor, student, or volunteer when making home visits to individuals.
(3) For the purposes of this section:
(a) "Off-site" means the provision of services by a licensed behavioral health agency at a location where the assessment or treatment is not the primary purpose of the site, such as in schools, hospitals, long-term care facilities, correctional facilities, an individual's residence, the community, or housing provided by or under an agreement with the agency.
(b) "Established off-site location" means a location that is regularly used and set up to provide services rather than a location used on an individual, case-by-case basis.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160, 71.24.037 and chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW. WSR 21-12-042, § 246-341-0342, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-0342, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.]



PDF246-341-0365

Agency licensure and certificationFee requirements.

(1) Payment of licensing and specific service certification fees required under this chapter must be included with the initial application, renewal application, or with requests for other services.
(2) Payment of fees must be made by check, bank draft, electronic transfer, or money order made payable to the department.
(3) The department may refund one-half of the application fee if an application is withdrawn before certification or denial.
(4) Fees will not be refunded when licensure or certification is denied, revoked, or suspended.
(5) The department charges the following fees for approved substance use disorder treatment programs:
Application fees for agency certification for approved substance use disorder treatment programs
New agency application
$1,000
Branch agency application
$500
Application to add one or more services
$200
Application to change ownership
$500
Initial and annual certification fees for withdrawal management, residential, and nonresidential services
Withdrawal management and residential services
$100 per licensed bed, per year, for agencies not renewing certification through deeming
 
$50 per licensed bed, per year, for agencies renewing certification through deeming per WAC 246-341-0310
Nonresidential services
$750 per year for agencies not renewing certification through deeming
 
$200 per year for agencies certified through deeming per WAC 246-341-0310
Complaint/critical incident investigation fees
All agencies
$1,000 per substantiated complaint investigation and $1,000 per substantiated critical incident investigation that results in a requirement for corrective action
(6) Agencies must annually complete a declaration form provided by the department to indicate information necessary for establishing fees and updating certification information. Required information includes, but is not limited to:
(a) The number of licensed withdrawal management and residential beds; and
(b) The agency provider's national accreditation status.
(7) The department charges the following fees for approved mental health treatment programs:
Initial licensing application fee for mental health treatment programs
Licensing application fee
$1,000 initial licensing fee
Initial and annual licensing fees for agencies not deemed
Annual service hours provided:
Initial and annual licensing fees:
0-3,999
$728
4,000-14,999
$1,055
15,000-29,999
$1,405
30,000-49,999
$2,105
50,000 or more
$2,575
Annual licensing fees for deemed agencies
Deemed agencies
licensed by the department
$500 annual licensing fee
Complaint/critical incident investigation fee
All residential and
nonresidential agencies
$1,000 per substantiated complaint investigation and $1,000 per substantiated critical incident investigation that results in a requirement for corrective action
(8) Agencies providing nonresidential mental health services must report the number of annual service hours provided.
(a) Existing licensed agencies must compute the annual service hours based on the most recent state fiscal year.
(b) Newly licensed agencies must compute the annual service hours by projecting the service hours for the first twelve months of operation.
(9) Agencies providing mental health peer respite services, intensive behavioral health treatment services, evaluation and treatment services, and competency evaluation and restoration treatment services must pay the following certification fees:
(a) Ninety dollars initial certification fee, per bed; and
(b) Ninety dollars annual certification fee, per bed.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160, 71.24.037 and chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW. WSR 21-12-042, § 246-341-0365, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: 2019 c 324, RCW 71.24.037, 71.24.648, and 71.24.649. WSR 20-07-091, § 246-341-0365, filed 3/17/20, effective 5/1/20. Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-0365, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.]



PDF246-341-0367

Agency licensure and certification—Fee requirements for tribal attestations.

(1) A tribe may attest that its behavioral health agency meets state minimum standards for a licensed or certified behavioral health agency, as described by the definition of "licensed or certified behavioral health agency" in RCW 71.24.025.
(2) A tribe that is pursuing attestation with the department must submit a two hundred sixty-one dollar administrative processing fee to the department for any new or renewed attestation.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160, 71.24.037 and chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW. WSR 21-12-042, § 246-341-0367, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: RCW 43.70.250, 43.70.280, 71.24.037, and 71.24.025. WSR 20-02-116, § 246-341-0367, filed 1/2/20, effective 1/2/20.]



PDF246-341-0370

Agency licensure and certificationAppealing a department decision.

An agency may appeal a decision made by the department regarding agency licensure or certification of a behavioral health service according to WAC 246-341-0335.
[Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-0370, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.]



PDF246-341-0400

Agency administrationGoverning body requirements.

A governing body is the entity with legal authority and responsibility for the operation of the behavioral health agency, to include its officers, board of directors or the trustees of a corporation or limited liability company. An agency's governing body is responsible for the conduct and quality of the behavioral health services provided. The agency's governing body must:
(1) Assure there is an administrator responsible for the day-to-day operation of services;
(2) Maintain a current job description for the administrator, including the administrator's authority and duties; and
(3) Notify the department within thirty days of changing the administrator.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160, 71.24.037 and chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW. WSR 21-12-042, § 246-341-0400, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-0400, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.]



PDF246-341-0410

Agency administrationAdministrator key responsibilities.

(1) The agency administrator is responsible for the day-to-day operation of the agency's provision of certified behavioral health treatment services, including:
(a) All administrative matters;
(b) Individual care services; and
(c) Meeting all applicable rules, policies, and ethical standards.
(2) The administrator may delegate the responsibilities assigned to them under this section to appropriate staff. The administrator retains overall responsibility for responsibilities delegated to appropriate staff.
(3) The administrator must delegate to a staff person the duty and responsibility to act on the administrator's behalf when the administrator is not on duty or on call.
(4) The administrator or their designee must ensure:
(a) Administrative, personnel, and clinical policies and procedures are adhered to and compliant with the rules in this chapter and other applicable state and federal statutes and regulations;
(b) There is sufficient qualified personnel to provide adequate treatment services and facility security;
(c) All persons providing clinical services are appropriately credentialed for the clinical services they provide;
(d) Clinical supervision of all clinical services including clinical services provided by trainees, students, and volunteers;
(e) There is an up-to-date personnel file for each employee, trainee, student, volunteer, and for each contracted staff person who provides or supervises an individual's care;
(f) Personnel records document that Washington state patrol background checks consistent with chapter 43.43 RCW have been completed for each employee in contact with individuals receiving services; and
(g) A written internal quality management plan, human resources plan or similarly specialized plan, as appropriate, is developed and maintained that:
(i) Addresses the clinical supervision and training of staff providing clinical services;
(ii) Monitors compliance with the rules in this chapter, and other state and federal rules and laws that govern agency licensing and certification requirements; and
(iii) Continuously improves the quality of care in all of the following:
(A) Cultural competency that aligns with the agency's local community and individuals the agency serves or may serve;
(B) Use of evidence based and promising practices; and
(C) In response to critical incidents and substantiated complaints.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160, 71.24.037 and chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW. WSR 21-12-042, § 246-341-0410, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-0410, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.]



PDF246-341-0420

Agency policies and procedures.

Each agency licensed by the department to provide any behavioral health service must develop, implement, and maintain policies and procedures that address all of the applicable licensing and certification requirements of this chapter including administrative and personnel policies and procedures. Administrative policies and procedures must demonstrate the following, as applicable:
(1) Ownership. Documentation of the agency's governing body, including a description of membership and authorities, and documentation of the agency's:
(a) Articles and certificate of incorporation and bylaws if the owner is a corporation;
(b) Partnership agreement if the owner is a partnership; or
(c) Sole proprietorship if one person is the owner.
(2) Licensure. A copy of the agency's master business license that authorizes the organization to do business in Washington state that lists all addresses where the entity performs services.
(3) Organizational description. An organizational description detailing all positions and associated licensure or certification, updated as needed.
(4) Agency staffing. Documentation that shows the agency has adequate staffing to provide treatment in accordance with regulations relevant to their specialty or specialties and registration, certification, licensing, and trainee or volunteer status.
(5) Interpreter services for individuals with limited-English proficiency (LEP) and individuals who have sensory disabilities. Documentation that demonstrates the agency's ability to provide or coordinate services for individuals with LEP and individuals who have sensory disabilities. This means:
(a) Certified interpreters or other interpreter services must be available for individuals with LEP and individuals who have sensory disabilities; or
(b) The agency must have the ability to effectively provide, coordinate or refer individuals in these populations for appropriate assessment or treatment.
(6) Reasonable access for individuals with disabilities. A description of how reasonable accommodations will be provided to individuals with disabilities.
(7) Nondiscrimination. A description of how the agency complies with all state and federal nondiscrimination laws, rules, and plans.
(8) State and federal rules on confidentiality. A description of how the agency implements state and federal rules on individuals' confidentiality consistent with the service or services being provided.
(9) Reporting and documentation of suspected abuse, neglect, or exploitation. A description how the agency directs staff to report and document suspected abuse, neglect, or exploitation of a child or vulnerable adult consistent with chapters 26.44 and 74.34 RCW.
(10) Reporting of impaired practitioners in accordance with chapters 18.130 RCW and 246-16 WAC.
(11) Protection of youth. Documentation of how the agency addresses compliance with service-specific rules and the protection of youth participating in group or residential treatment with adults and how the agency will follow the requirements of chapter 71.34 RCW when an adolescent seeks treatment for themselves and for family initiated treatment of an adolescent.
(12) Completing and submitting reports. A description of how the agency directs staff to complete and submit in a timely manner, all reports required by entities such as the courts, department of corrections, department of licensing, the department of social and health services, the health care authority, and the department of health.
(13) Reporting critical incidents. A description of how the agency directs staff to report to the department within forty-eight hours any critical incident that occurs involving an individual, and actions taken as a result of the incident. A critical incident is a serious or undesirable outcome that occurs in the agency including:
(a) Allegations of abuse, neglect, or exploitation;
(b) Death, including death by suicide;
(c) Injuries resulting in admission to a hospital as an inpatient; or
(d) Outbreak of communicable disease within the agency.
(14) A smoking policy. Documentation that a smoking policy consistent with chapter 70.160 RCW, and in compliance with applicable county ordinances, is in effect.
(15) Evacuation plan. Documentation that the residential or inpatient agency has an evacuation plan consistent with chapter 246-320, 246-322, 246-324, or 246-337 WAC. For a nonresidential agency, documentation of an evacuation plan for use in the event of a disaster or emergency that addresses:
(a) Different types of disasters or emergencies;
(b) Placement of posters showing routes of exit;
(c) The need to mention evacuation routes at public meetings;
(d) Communication methods for individuals, staff, and visitors, including persons with a visual or hearing impairment or limitation;
(e) Evacuation of mobility impaired individuals; and
(f) Evacuation of children if child care is offered.
(16) Individual rights. A description of how the agency has individual participation rights and policies consistent with WAC 246-341-0600.
(17) Individual complaints. A description of how the agency addresses an individual's right to report an alleged violation of chapter 70.41, 71.05, 71.12, 71.24, or 71.34 RCW, and this chapter consistent with WAC 246-341-0605;
(18) Personnel policies and procedures must address the following:
(a) Background checks and disclosure statements. Identification of how the agency conducts Washington state background checks and obtains disclosure statements on each agency employee with unsupervised access to individuals receiving services, consistent with RCW 43.43.830 through 43.43.842.
(b) Drug-free workplace. Identification of how the agency provides for a drug-free workplace that includes:
(i) Agency program standards of prohibited conduct; and
(ii) Actions to be taken in the event a staff member misuses alcohol or other drugs, including referral to a department-approved impaired practitioner or voluntary substance use monitoring program.
(c) Supervision. Identification of how supervision is provided to assist clinical and nonclinical staff and volunteers to increase their skills and improve quality of services to individuals and families.
(d) Staff training. A description of how the agency provides training initial orientation and annual training thereafter in accordance with WAC 246-341-0510.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160, 71.24.037 and chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW. WSR 21-12-042, § 246-341-0420, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-0420, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.]



PDF246-341-0425

Agency administrationIndividual clinical record system.

Each agency must:
(1) Maintain a comprehensive clinical record system that includes policies and procedures that protect an individual's personal health information;
(2) Ensure that the individual's personal health information is shared or released only in compliance with applicable state and federal law;
(3) If maintaining electronic individual clinical records:
(a) Provide secure, limited access through means that prevent modification or deletion after initial preparation;
(b) Provide for a backup of records in the event of equipment, media, or human error;
(c) Provide for protection from unauthorized access, including network and internet access;
(d) Provide that each entry made in an individual's clinical records clearly identifies the author and who approved the entry, if applicable; and
(e) Prohibit agency employees from using another employee's credentials to access, author, modify, or delete an entry from an individual's clinical record;
(4) Retain an individual's clinical record, including an electronic record, for a minimum of six years after the most recent discharge or transfer of any individual;
(5) Retain a youth's or child's individual clinical record, including an electronic record, for at least six years after the most recent discharge, or until the youth's or child's twenty-first birthday, whichever is longer; and
(6) Ensure secure storage of active or closed confidential records.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160, 71.24.037 and chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW. WSR 21-12-042, § 246-341-0425, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-0425, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.]



PDF246-341-0510

PersonnelAgency record requirements.

Each agency must maintain a personnel record for each person employed by the agency.
(1) The personnel record must contain all of the following:
(a) A signed position description.
(b) A signed and dated commitment to maintain patient (individual) confidentiality in accordance with state and federal confidentiality requirements.
(c) A record of an orientation to the agency within ninety days of hire that includes all of the following:
(i) An overview of the agency's policies and procedures.
(ii) Staff ethical standards and conduct, including reporting of unprofessional conduct to appropriate authorities.
(iii) The process for resolving client concerns.
(iv) Cultural competency.
(v) Violence prevention training on the safety and violence prevention topics described in RCW 49.19.030.
(vi) If providing substance use disorder services, prevention and control of communicable disease, bloodborne pathogens, and tuberculosis.
(d) A record of annual training that includes:
(i) Cultural competency; and
(ii) If providing substance use disorder services, prevention and control of communicable disease, bloodborne pathogens, and tuberculosis.
(e) A record of violence prevention training on the safety and violence prevention topics described in RCW 49.19.030; annually for employees working directly with clients receiving mental health services per RCW 71.05.720 or according to the agency's workplace violence plan required per RCW 49.19.020.
(f) A copy of the staff member's valid current credential issued by the department if they provide clinical services.
(2) Staff members who have received services from the agency must have personnel records that:
(a) Are separate from clinical records; and
(b) Have no indication of current or previous service recipient status, unless the information is shared voluntarily for the purposes of employment as a certified peer counselor.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160, 71.24.037 and chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW. WSR 21-12-042, § 246-341-0510, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-0510, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.]



PDF246-341-0515

PersonnelAgency staff requirements.

Each agency must ensure that all of the following staff requirements are met:
(1) All staff providing clinical services are appropriately credentialed for the services they provide, which may include a co-occurring disorder specialist enhancement.
(2) All staff providing clinical services receive clinical supervision;
(3) All staff providing clinical mental health services have access to consultation with a psychiatrist, physician, physician assistant, advanced registered nurse practitioner, or psychologist who has at least one year's experience in the direct treatment of individuals who have a mental or emotional disorder.
(4) An agency providing group counseling or group therapy must have a staff ratio of at least one staff member to every sixteen individuals during group counseling or therapy sessions.
(5) A Mental health professional is:
(a) A psychiatrist, psychologist, physician assistant working with a supervising psychiatrist, psychiatric advanced registered nurse practitioner (ARNP), psychiatric nurse, or social worker as defined in chapters 71.05 and 71.34 RCW;
(b) A person who is licensed by the department as a mental health counselor or mental health counselor associate, marriage and family therapist, or marriage and family therapist associate; or
(c) An agency staff member with a designation given by the department or an attestation by the licensed behavioral health agency that the person meets the following:
(i) Holds a master's degree or further advanced degree in counseling or one of the social sciences from an accredited college or university who has at least two years of experience in direct treatment of persons with mental illness or emotional disturbance, experience that was gained under the supervision of a mental health professional recognized by the department or attested to by the licensed behavioral health agency;
(ii) Who meets the waiver criteria of RCW 71.24.260, and the waiver was granted prior to 1986; or
(iii) Who had an approved waiver to perform the duties of a mental health professional (MHP), that was requested by the behavioral health organization (BHO) and granted by the mental health division prior to July 1, 2001.
(6) An agency providing problem gambling and gambling disorder treatment services must ensure staffing in accordance with WAC 246-341-0754.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160, 71.24.037 and chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW. WSR 21-12-042, § 246-341-0515, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-0515, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.]



PDF246-341-0520

PersonnelAgency requirements for supervision of trainees, interns, volunteers, and students.

Each agency licensed by the department to provide any behavioral health service must ensure the following supervision requirements are met for trainees, interns, volunteers, and students:
(1) Each trainee, intern, volunteer, and student with unsupervised access to individuals receiving services obtains a background check and submits a disclosure statement consistent with RCW 43.43.830 through 43.43.842;
(2) Each trainee, intern, volunteer, and student who receives clinical training must receive clinical supervision that includes review of clinical documentation with the trainee, intern, volunteer, or student as part of the supervision process; and
(3) The agency must obtain and retain a confidentiality statement signed by the trainee, intern, volunteer, and student and the person's academic supervisor, if applicable.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160, 71.24.037 and chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW. WSR 21-12-042, § 246-341-0520, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-0520, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.]



PDF246-341-0600

ClinicalIndividual rights.

(1) Each agency must protect and promote individual participant rights applicable to the services the agency is certified to provide in compliance with this chapter, and chapters 70.41, 71.05, 71.12, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW, as applicable.
(2) Each agency must develop a statement of individual participant rights applicable to the services the agency is certified to provide, to ensure an individual's rights are protected in compliance with chapters 70.41, 71.05, 71.12, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW, as applicable. To the extent that the rights set out in those chapters do not specifically address the rights in this subsection or are not applicable to all of the agency's services, the agency must develop a general statement of individual participant rights that incorporates at a minimum the following statements. "You have the right to:"
(a) Receive services without regard to race, creed, national origin, religion, gender, sexual orientation, age or disability;
(b) Practice the religion of choice as long as the practice does not infringe on the rights and treatment of others or the treatment service. Individual participants have the right to refuse participation in any religious practice;
(c) Be reasonably accommodated in case of sensory or physical disability, limited ability to communicate, limited-English proficiency, and cultural differences;
(d) Be treated with respect, dignity and privacy, except that staff may conduct reasonable searches to detect and prevent possession or use of contraband on the premises or to address risk of harm to the individual or others. "Reasonable" is defined as minimally invasive searches to detect contraband or invasive searches only upon the initial intake process or if there is reasonable suspicion of possession of contraband or the presence of other risk that could be used to cause harm to self or others;
(e) Be free of any sexual harassment;
(f) Be free of exploitation, including physical and financial exploitation;
(g) Have all clinical and personal information treated in accord with state and federal confidentiality regulations;
(h) Participate in the development of your individual service plan and receive a copy of the plan if desired;
(i) Review your clinical record in the presence of the administrator or designee and be given an opportunity to request amendments or corrections; and
(j) Submit a report to the department when you feel the agency has violated a WAC requirement regulating behavioral health agencies.
(3) Each agency must ensure the applicable individual participant rights described in subsection (1) of this section are:
(a) Provided in writing to each individual on or before admission;
(b) Available in alternative formats for individuals who are visually impaired;
(c) Translated to the most commonly used languages in the agency's service area;
(d) Posted in public areas; and
(e) Available to any participant upon request.
(4) At the time of admission and upon client request, the agency must provide each client with information on how to file a report to the department if they feel their rights or requirements of this chapter have been violated.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160, 71.24.037 and chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW. WSR 21-12-042, § 246-341-0600, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-0600, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.]



PDF246-341-0605

Complaint process.

(1) Any person may submit a report to the department of an alleged violation of licensing and certification laws and rules.
(2) Health care professionals credentialed by the department must comply with the mandatory reporting requirements in chapters 18.130 RCW and 246-16 WAC.
(3) If the department determines a report should be investigated, the report becomes a complaint. If the department conducts a complaint investigation, agency representatives must cooperate to allow department representatives to:
(a) Examine any part of the facility at reasonable times and as needed;
(b) Review and evaluate agency records including, but not limited to:
(i) An individual's clinical record and personnel file; and
(ii) The agency's policies, procedures, fiscal records, and any other documents required by the department to determine compliance and to resolve the complaint; and
(c) Conduct individual interviews with staff members and individuals receiving services.
(4) An agency or agency provider must not retaliate against any:
(a) Individual or individual's representative for making a report with the department or being interviewed by the department about a complaint;
(b) A witness involved in the complaint issue; or
(c) An employee of the agency.
(5) The department may assess a fine under RCW 43.70.250, or deny, suspend, or modify a license or certification under RCW 43.70.115, if:
(a) Any allegation within the complaint is substantiated; or
(b) The department's finding that the individual or individual's representative, a witness, or employee of the agency experienced an act of retaliation by the agency as described in subsection (4) of this section during or after a complaint investigation.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160, 71.24.037 and chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW. WSR 21-12-042, § 246-341-0605, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-0605, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.]



PDF246-341-0640

Clinical record content.

Each agency is responsible for the components and documentation in an individual's clinical record content unless specified otherwise in specific service certification requirements.
(1) The clinical record must include:
(a) Documentation the individual received a copy of counselor disclosure requirements as required for the counselor's credential.
(b) Identifying information.
(c) An assessment which is an age-appropriate, strengths-based psychosocial assessment that considers current needs and the individual's relevant behavioral and physical health history according to best practices, completed by a person appropriately credentialed or qualified to provide the type of assessment pertaining to the service(s) being sought, which includes:
(i) Presenting issue(s);
(ii) An assessment of any risk of harm to self and others, including suicide, homicide, and a history of self-harm and, if the assessment indicates there is such a risk, a referral for provision of emergency/crisis services;
(iii) Treatment recommendations or recommendations for additional program-specific assessment; and
(iv) A diagnostic assessment statement, including sufficient information to determine a diagnosis supported by the current and applicable Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) or a placement decision, using ASAM criteria dimensions, when the assessment indicates the individual is in need of substance use disorder services.
(d) Individual service plan that:
(i) Is completed or approved by a person appropriately credentialed or qualified to provide mental health, substance use, co-occurring, or problem gambling disorder services;
(ii) Addresses issues identified in the assessment and by the individual or, if applicable, the individual's parent(s) or legal representative;
(iii) Contains measurable goals or objectives and interventions;
(iv) Must be mutually agreed upon and updated to address changes in identified needs and achievement of goals or at the request of the individual or, if applicable, the individual's parent or legal representative;
(v) Must be in a terminology that is understandable to the individuals and the individual's family or legal representative, if applicable.
(e) If treatment is not court-ordered, documentation of informed consent to treatment by the individual or individual's parent, or other legal representative.
(f) Progress and group notes including the date, time, duration, participant's name, response to interventions or clinically significant behaviors during the group session, and a brief summary of the individual or group session and the name and credential of the staff member who provided it.
(g) If treatment is for a substance use disorder, documentation that ASAM criteria was used for admission, continued services, referral, and discharge planning and decisions.
(h) Discharge information as follows:
(i) A discharge statement if the individual left without notice; or
(ii) Discharge information for an individual who did not leave without notice, completed within seven working days of the individual's discharge, including:
(A) The date of discharge;
(B) Continuing care plan; and
(C) If applicable, current prescribed medication.
(2) When the following situations apply, the clinical record must include:
(a) Documentation of confidential information that has been released without the consent of the individual under:
(i) RCW 70.02.050;
(ii) The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA); and
(iii) RCW 70.02.230 and 70.02.240 if the individual received mental health treatment services;
(iv) 42 C.F.R. Part 2.
(b) Documentation that any mandatory reporting of abuse, neglect, or exploitation consistent with chapters 26.44 and 74.34 RCW has occurred.
(c) If treatment is court-ordered, a copy of the order.
(d) Medication records.
(e) Laboratory reports.
(f) Properly completed authorizations for release of information.
(g) Documentation that copies of documents pertinent to the individual's course of treatment were forwarded to the new service provider with the individual's permission.
(h) A copy of any report required by entities such as the courts, department of corrections, department of licensing, and the department of health, and the date the report was submitted.
(i) Documentation of coordination with any systems or organizations the individual identifies as being relevant to treatment, with the individual's consent or if applicable, the consent of the individual's parent or legal representation.
(j) A crisis plan, if one has been developed.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160, 71.24.037 and chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW. WSR 21-12-042, § 246-341-0640, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-0640, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.]



PDF246-341-0650

ClinicalAccess to clinical records.

(1) Each agency must only provide access to clinical records in compliance with applicable state and federal statutes and regulations.
(2) When providing access to clinical records to an individual, the agency must allow appropriate time and privacy for the review and have a clinical staff member available to answer questions.
(3) If the agency maintains electronic clinical records, the agency must make the records available in hard-copy form.
(4) The agency must allow the department access to individual clinical records.
(5) When an individual receiving mental health services is under the supervision of the department of corrections (DOC), the agency must make information available to DOC, in accordance with RCW 71.05.445. The information released does not require the consent of the individual.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160, 71.24.037 and chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW. WSR 21-12-042, § 246-341-0650, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-0650, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.]



PDF246-341-0700

Outpatient and recovery support servicesGeneral.

Outpatient behavioral health services and recovery support services are intended to improve or reduce symptoms and help facilitate resolution of situational disturbances for individuals in the areas of relationships, employment, and community integration.
(1) Outpatient services include the certifications described in WAC 246-341-0702 through 246-341-0754.
(2) Recovery support services include the certifications described in WAC 246-341-0720 through 246-341-0730.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160, 71.24.037 and chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW. WSR 21-12-042, § 246-341-0700, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: 2019 c 324, RCW 71.24.037, 71.24.648, and 71.24.649. WSR 20-07-091, § 246-341-0700, filed 3/17/20, effective 5/1/20. Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-0700, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.]



PDF246-341-0702

Outpatient servicesIndividual mental health treatment services.

Individual mental health treatment services are services designed to assist an individual in attaining the goals identified in the individual service plan. The treatment services are conducted with the individual and any natural supports as identified by the individual.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160, 71.24.037 and chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW. WSR 21-12-042, § 246-341-0702, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-0702, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.]



PDF246-341-0704

Outpatient servicesBrief mental health intervention treatment services.

Brief mental health intervention treatment services are solution-focused and outcome-oriented cognitive and behavioral interventions, intended to resolve situational disturbances. These services do not require long-term treatment, are generally completed in six months or less, and do not include ongoing care, maintenance, or monitoring of the individual's current level of function or assistance with self-care or life skills training.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160, 71.24.037 and chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW. WSR 21-12-042, § 246-341-0704, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-0704, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.]



PDF246-341-0706

Outpatient servicesGroup mental health therapy services.

Group mental health therapy services are provided to an individual in a group setting to assist the individual in attaining the goals described in the individual service plan.
[Statutory RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160, 71.24.037 and chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW. WSR 21-12-042, § 246-341-0706, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-0706, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.]



PDF246-341-0708

Outpatient servicesFamily therapy mental health services.

(1) Family therapy mental health services are services provided for the direct benefit of an individual, with either family members, or other relevant persons, or both, in attendance, with the consent of the individual.
(2) Interventions must identify and build competencies to strengthen family functioning in relationship to the individual's identified goals. The individual may or may not be present.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160, 71.24.037 and chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW. WSR 21-12-042, § 246-341-0708, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-0708, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.]



PDF246-341-0710

Outpatient servicesRehabilitative case management mental health services.

Rehabilitative case management mental health services are services that meet the ongoing assessment, facilitation, care coordination and advocacy for options and services to meet an individual's needs through communication and available resources, to promote quality and effective outcomes during and following a hospitalization.
(1) Rehabilitative case management services support individual employment, education, and participation in other daily activities appropriate to the individual's age, gender, and culture, and assist individuals in resolving crises in the least restrictive setting.
(2) Rehabilitative case management services include specific rehabilitative services provided to:
(a) Assist in an individual's discharge from an inpatient facility; and
(b) Minimize the risk of readmission to an inpatient setting.
(3) An agency providing rehabilitative case management is not required to complete the assessment requirement in WAC 246-341-0640 (1)(c).
[Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160, 71.24.037 and chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW. WSR 21-12-042, § 246-341-0710, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-0710, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.]



PDF246-341-0712

Outpatient servicesPsychiatric medication management services.

Psychiatric medication management services are a variety of activities related to prescribing and administering medication, including monitoring an individual for side effects and changes as needed.
(1) An agency providing psychiatric medication management services must:
(a) Ensure that medical direction and responsibility are assigned to a:
(i) Physician who is licensed to practice under chapter 18.57 or 18.71 RCW, and is board-certified or board-eligible in psychiatry;
(ii) Psychiatric advanced registered nurse practitioner (ARNP) licensed under chapter 18.79 RCW; or
(iii) Physician assistant licensed under chapter 18.71A or 18.57A RCW working with a supervising psychiatrist.
(b) Ensure that the services are provided by a prescriber licensed by the department who is practicing within the scope of that practice;
(c) Ensure that all staff administering medications are appropriately credentialed;
(d) Have a process by which the medication prescriber informs either the individual, the legally responsible party, or both, and, as appropriate, family members, of the potential benefits and side effects of the prescribed medication(s);
(e) Must ensure that all medications maintained by the agency are safely and securely stored, including assurance that:
(i) Medications are kept in locked cabinets within a well-lit, locked and properly ventilated room;
(ii) Medications kept for individuals on medication administration or self-administration programs are clearly labeled and stored separately from medication samples kept on-site;
(iii) Medications marked "for external use only" are stored separately from oral or injectable medications;
(iv) Refrigerated food or beverages used in the administration of medications are kept separate from the refrigerated medications by the use of trays or other designated containers;
(v) Syringes and sharp objects are properly stored and disposed of;
(vi) Refrigerated medications are maintained at the required temperature; and
(vii) If the individual gives permission for disposal, outdated medications are disposed of in accordance with the regulations of the pharmacy quality assurance commission and no outdated medications are retained.
(2) An agency providing psychiatric medication management services may utilize a physician or ARNP without board eligibility in psychiatry if unable to employ or contract with a psychiatrist. In this case, the agency must ensure that:
(a) Psychiatrist consultation is provided to the physician or ARNP at least monthly; and
(b) A psychiatrist or psychiatric ARNP is accessible to the physician or ARNP for emergency consultation.
(c) Ensure that the individual's clinical record contains documentation of medication management services.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160, 71.24.037 and chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW. WSR 21-12-042, § 246-341-0712, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-0712, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.]



PDF246-341-0713

Outpatient servicesMedication monitoring services.

(1) Medication monitoring services occur face-to-face and:
(a) Include one-on-one cueing, observing, and encouraging an individual to take medication as prescribed;
(b) Include reporting any pertinent information related to the individual's adherence to the medication back to the agency that is providing psychiatric medication services; and
(c) May take place at any location and for as long as it is clinically necessary.
(2) An agency providing medication monitoring services must:
(a) Ensure that the staff positions responsible for providing either medication monitoring, or delivery services, or both, are clearly identified in the agency's medication monitoring services policy;
(b) Have appropriate policies and procedures in place when the agency providing medication monitoring services maintains or delivers medication to the individual that address:
(i) The maintenance of a medication log documenting the type and dosage of medications, and the time and date;
(ii) Reasonable precautions that need to be taken when transporting medications to the intended individual and to assure staff safety during the transportation; and
(iii) The prevention of contamination of medication during delivery, if delivery is provided.
(c) Ensure that the individual's clinical record includes documentation of medication monitoring services.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160, 71.24.037 and chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW. WSR 21-12-042, § 246-341-0713, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21.]



PDF246-341-0714

Outpatient servicesDay support mental health services.

(1) Day support mental health services provide a range of integrated and varied life skills training. Day support services are designed to assist an individual in the acquisition of skills, retention of current functioning, or improvement in the current level of functioning, appropriate socialization, and adaptive coping skills.
(2) Services include training in basic living and social skills, and educational, vocational, prevocational, and day activities. Day support services may include therapeutic treatment.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160, 71.24.037 and chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW. WSR 21-12-042, § 246-341-0714, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-0714, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.]



PDF246-341-0718

Recovery support servicesRecovery supportGeneral.

Recovery support services are intended to promote an individual's socialization, recovery, self-advocacy, development of natural support, and maintenance of community living skills.
(1) Recovery support services include:
(a) Supported employment services;
(b) Supportive housing services;
(c) Peer support services;
(d) Mental health peer respite services;
(e) Applied behavior analysis (ABA) services; and
(f) Consumer-run clubhouse services.
(2) An agency that provides any recovery support service may operate through an agreement with a licensed behavioral health agency that provides certified outpatient behavioral health services described in WAC 246-341-0702 through 246-341-0754. The agreement must specify the responsibility for initial assessments, the determination of appropriate services, individual service planning, and the documentation of these requirements in order to meet the requirements in WAC 246-341-0640. Subsections (3) and (4) of this section list the abbreviated requirements for assessments, staff, and clinical records.
(3) When providing any recovery support service, a behavioral health agency must:
(a) Have an assessment process to determine the appropriateness of the agency's services, based on the individual's needs and goals;
(b) Refer an individual to a more intensive level of care when appropriate; and
(c) With the consent of the individual, include the individual's family members, significant others, and other relevant treatment providers as necessary to provide support to the individual.
(4) An agency providing any recovery support service must maintain an individual's clinical record that contains:
(a) Documentation of the following:
(i) The name of the agency or other sources through which the individual was referred;
(ii) A brief summary of each service encounter, including the date, time, and duration of the encounter; and
(iii) Names of participant(s), including the name of the individual who provided the service.
(b) Any information or copies of documents shared by, or with, a behavioral health agency certified for outpatient mental health services.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160, 71.24.037 and chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW. WSR 21-12-042, § 246-341-0718, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: 2019 c 324, RCW 71.24.037, 71.24.648, and 71.24.649. WSR 20-07-091, § 246-341-0718, filed 3/17/20, effective 5/1/20. Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-0718, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.]



PDF246-341-0720

Outpatient servicesRecovery supportSupported employment mental health and substance use disorder services.

Supported employment mental health and substance use disorder services assist in job search, placement services, and training to help individuals find competitive jobs in their local communities.
(1) A behavioral health agency that provides supported employment services must have knowledge of and provide individuals access to employment and education opportunities by coordinating efforts with one or more entities that provide other rehabilitation and employment services, such as:
(a) The department of social and health services' division of vocational rehabilitation (DVR);
(b) The department of social and health services' community services offices;
(c) State board for community and technical colleges;
(d) The business community;
(e) WorkSource, Washington state's official site for online employment services;
(f) Washington state department of employment security; and
(g) Organizations that provide job placement within the community.
(2) A behavioral health agency that provides supported employment services must:
(a) Ensure all staff members who provide direct services for employment are knowledgeable and familiar with services provided by the department of social and health services' division of vocational rehabilitation;
(b) Conduct and document a vocational assessment in partnership with the individual that includes work history, skills, training, education, and personal career goals;
(c) Assist the individual to create an individualized job and career development plan that focuses on the individual's strengths and skills;
(d) Assist the individual to locate employment opportunities that are consistent with the individual's skills, goals, and interests;
(e) Provide and document any outreach, job coaching, and support at the individual's worksite when requested by the individual or the individual's employer; and
(f) If the employer makes a request, provide information regarding the requirements of reasonable accommodations, consistent with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990 and Washington state antidiscrimination law.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160, 71.24.037 and chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW. WSR 21-12-042, § 246-341-0720, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-0720, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.]



PDF246-341-0722

Outpatient servicesRecovery supportSupportive housing mental health and substance use disorder services.

Supportive housing mental health and substance use disorder services support an individual's transition to community integrated housing and support the individual to be a successful tenant in a housing arrangement.
(1) A behavioral health agency that provides supportive housing services must have knowledge of and provide housing related collaborative activities to assist individuals in identifying, coordinating, and securing housing or housing resources with entities such as:
(a) Local homeless continuum of care groups or local homeless planning groups;
(b) Housing authorities that operate in a county or city;
(c) Community action councils;
(d) Landlords of privately owned residential homes; and
(e) State agencies that provide housing resources.
(2) A behavioral health agency that provides supportive housing services must:
(a) Ensure all staff members who provide direct services for supportive housing are knowledgeable and familiar with fair housing laws;
(b) Conduct and document a housing assessment in partnership with the individual that includes housing preferences, affordability, and barriers to housing;
(c) Conduct and document a functional needs assessment in partnership with the individual that includes independent living skills and personal community integration goals;
(d) Assist the individual to create an individualized housing acquisition and maintenance plan that focuses on the individual's choice in housing;
(e) Assist the individual to locate housing opportunities that are consistent with the individual's preferences, goals, and interests;
(f) Provide any outreach, tenancy support, and independent living skill building supports at a location convenient to the individual;
(g) Provide the individual with information regarding the requirements of the Fair Housing Act, Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990, and Washington state antidiscrimination law, and post this information in a public place in the agency; and
(h) Ensure the services are specific to each individual and meant to assist in obtaining and maintaining housing in scattered-site, clustered, integrated, or single-site housing as long as the individual holds a lease or sublease.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160, 71.24.037 and chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW. WSR 21-12-042, § 246-341-0722, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-0722, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.]



PDF246-341-0724

Outpatient servicesRecovery supportPeer support behavioral health services.

(1) Peer support behavioral health services provide a wide range of activities to assist an individual in exercising control over their own life and recovery process through:
(a) Developing self-advocacy and natural supports;
(b) Maintenance of community living skills;
(c) Promoting socialization; and
(d) The practice of peer counselors sharing their own life experiences related to behavioral health disorders to build alliances that enhance the individual's ability to function.
(2) An agency that provides certified peer support services must:
(a) Ensure peer support counselors are recognized by the health care authority as a "peer counselor" as defined in WAC 246-341-0200; and
(b) Provide peer support services within the scope of the peer counselor's training and department of health credential.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160, 71.24.037 and chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW. WSR 21-12-042, § 246-341-0724, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-0724, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.]



PDF246-341-0725

Recovery support servicesRecovery supportMental health peer respite.

(1) Mental health peer respite services are voluntary, holistic, trauma-informed, short-term, noncrisis services, provided in a home-like environment, which focus on recovery and wellness. These services are limited to individuals who are:
(a) At least eighteen years of age;
(b) Experiencing psychiatric distress but who are not detained or involuntarily committed under chapter 71.05 RCW; and
(c) Independently seeking respite services by their own choice.
(2) An agency certified to provide mental health peer respite services must be licensed according to this chapter and meet the general requirements in:
(a) WAC 246-341-0718 for recovery support services; and
(b) WAC 246-341-0724 for peer support services.
(3) An agency certified to provide mental health peer respite services must develop and implement policies and procedures that address how the agency will:
(a) Have a memorandum of understanding with the local crisis system, including the closest agency providing evaluation and treatment services and designated crisis responders to ensure timely response to and assessment of individuals who need a higher level of care;
(b) Be staffed twenty-four-hours per day, seven days a week by certified peer counselors;
(c) Be peer-run. This includes:
(i) Having a managing board, with a majority of members who are peers, that manages the day-to-day operations of the mental health peer respite center and reports to the agency's governing board; and
(ii) Supervision of services by a certified peer counselor who meets the qualifications of a mental health professional.
(d) Limit services to an individual to a maximum of seven nights in a thirty-day period; and
(e) Develop and implement a guest agreement that establishes expectations for individuals receiving mental health peer respite services, including expectations for things such as: Cooking, cleaning, self-management of medications, and personal hygiene.
(4) An agency certified to provide mental health peer respite services must provide the services in a residence that meets local building and zoning codes and must develop and implement policies and procedures that address the following:
(a) Kitchen environment, including kitchen equipment that is in good working repair and follows general principles of safe food handling;
(b) Food storage, including how the agency will provide each individual with adequate storage for perishable and nonperishable food items;
(c) Laundry facilities, including how the agency will give residents access to laundry facilities and equipment that is clean and in good repair;
(d) Housekeeping, including cleaning, maintenance, and refuse disposal;
(e) Bedding and linens, including how the agency will provide each individual with clean, sanitary bedding and linens that are in good repair;
(f) Secure storage, including how each individual is provided with secure storage for personal belongings including medications;
(g) Furnishings, including how the agency will provide appropriate furniture for bedrooms and common spaces, as well as other furnishings appropriate to create a home-like setting; and
(h) Accessibility needs of individuals with disabilities as it relates to program operations and communications.
[Statutory Authority: 2019 c 324, RCW 71.24.037, 71.24.648, and 71.24.649. WSR 20-07-091, § 246-341-0725, filed 3/17/20, effective 5/1/20.]



PDF246-341-0728

Outpatient servicesRecovery supportApplied behavior analysis mental health services.

Applied behavior analysis (ABA) mental health services assist children and their families to improve the core symptoms associated with autism spectrum disorders or other developmental disabilities for which ABA services have been determined to be medically necessary.
(1) ABA services support learning, skill development, and assistance in any one or more of the following areas or domains:
(a) Social;
(b) Behavior;
(c) Adaptive;
(d) Motor;
(e) Vocational; or
(f) Cognitive.
(2) An agency providing ABA services must meet the:
(a) General requirements in WAC 246-341-0718 for recovery support services;
(b) Specific agency staff requirements in WAC 246-341-0718(4); and
(c) Specific clinical record content and documentation requirements in WAC 246-341-0640 and 246-341-0718(5).
(3) The health care authority (HCA) administers chapter 182-531A WAC for ABA services requirements. The rules in chapter 182-531A WAC include:
(a) Definitions that apply to ABA services;
(b) Program and clinical eligibility requirements;
(c) Prior authorization and recertification requirements;
(d) Specific ABA provider requirements;
(e) Covered and noncovered services;
(f) Billing requirements; and
(g) Requirements for:
(i) Referrals to and assessments by centers of excellence (COE) for evaluations and orders; and
(ii) ABA assessments and individualized ABA therapy treatment plans.
(4) The ABA therapy treatment plan must:
(a) Be developed and maintained by a lead behavior analysis therapist (LBAT) (see subsection (5) of this section);
(b) Identify the services to be delivered by the LBAT and the therapy assistant, if the agency employs a therapy assistant (see subsections (6) and (7) of this section);
(c) Be comprehensive and document treatment being provided by other health care professionals; and
(d) Document how all treatment will be coordinated, as applicable, with other members of the health care team.
(5) An agency certified to provide ABA services must employ a lead behavior analysis therapist (LBAT).
(a) To qualify as an LBAT, an individual must meet the professional requirements in chapter 182-531 WAC.
(b) The agency must ensure the LBAT meets other applicable requirements in chapter 182-531A WAC.
(6) An agency may choose to employ a therapy assistant.
(a) To qualify as a therapy assistant, an individual must meet the professional requirements in chapter 182-531A WAC.
(b) The agency must ensure the therapy assistant meets other applicable requirements in chapter 182-531A WAC.
(7) If the agency employs a therapy assistant(s), the agency must ensure the LBAT:
(a) Supervises the therapy assistant:
(i) For a minimum of five percent of the total direct care provided by the therapy assistant per week (for example, one hour of direct supervision per twenty hours of direct care); and
(ii) In accordance with agency policies and procedures;
(b) Meets the requirements in this section;
(c) Completes a review of an individual's ABA therapy treatment plan with the therapy assistant before services are provided;
(d) Assures the therapy assistant delivers services according to the individual's ABA therapy treatment plan; and
(e) Meets at least every two weeks with the therapy assistant and documents review of the individual's progress or response to the treatment, or both, and makes changes to the ABA therapy treatment plan as indicated by the individual's progress or response.
(8) To maintain department program-specific certification to provide ABA services, an agency must continue to ensure the requirements in this section are met.
[Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-0728, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.]



PDF246-341-0730

Outpatient servicesConsumer-run recovery supportClubhouses.

(1) A clubhouse is a community-based program that provides rehabilitation services.
(2) The clubhouse may be peer-operated and must:
(a) Be member-run with voluntary participation;
(b) Be recovery-focused;
(c) Focus on strengths, talents, and abilities of its members;
(d) Have a clubhouse director who:
(i) Engages members and staff in all aspects of the clubhouse operations; and
(ii) Is ultimately responsible for the operation of the clubhouse.
(e) Be comprised of structured activities including:
(i) Personal advocacy;
(ii) Help with securing entitlements;
(iii) Information on safe, appropriate, and affordable housing;
(iv) Community resource development;
(v) Connecting members with adult education opportunities in the community;
(vi) An active employment program that assists members to gain and maintain employment in full- or part-time competitive jobs. Employment related activities may include resume building, education on how employment will affect benefits, information on other employment services, and information regarding protections against employment discrimination; and
(vii) An array of social and recreational opportunities.
(f) Use a work-ordered day to allow all members the opportunity to participate in all the work of the clubhouse including:
(i) Administration;
(ii) Research;
(iii) Intake and orientation;
(iv) Outreach;
(v) Training and evaluation of staff;
(vi) Public relations;
(vii) Advocacy; and
(viii) Evaluation of clubhouse effectiveness.
(g) Provide in-house educational programs that significantly utilize the teaching and tutoring skills of members and assist members by helping them to take advantage of adult education opportunities in the community.
(3) "Work-ordered day" means a model used to organize clubhouse activities during the clubhouse's normal working hours.
(a) Members and staff are organized into one or more work units which provide meaningful and engaging work essential to running the clubhouse.
(b) Activities include unit meetings, planning, organizing the work of the day, and performing the work that needs to be accomplished to keep the clubhouse functioning.
(c) Members and staff work side-by-side as colleagues as evidenced by both the member and the staff signature on progress towards goals.
(d) Members participate as they feel ready and according to their individual interests.
(e) Work in the clubhouse is not intended to be job-specific training, and members are neither paid for clubhouse work nor provided artificial rewards.
(f) Work-ordered day does not include medication clinics, day treatment, or other therapy programs.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160, 71.24.037 and chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW. WSR 21-12-042, § 246-341-0730, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-0730, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.]



PDF246-341-0738

Outpatient servicesLevel one outpatient substance use disorder services.

Level one outpatient substance use disorder services provide individualized treatment that may include individual and group counseling, education, and activities.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160, 71.24.037 and chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW. WSR 21-12-042, § 246-341-0738, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-0738, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.]



PDF246-341-0740

Outpatient servicesLevel two intensive outpatient substance use disorder services.

(1) Level two intensive outpatient substance use disorder services provide a higher-intensity, concentrated level of individualized treatment that may include individual and group counseling, education, and other activities.
(2) An agency providing level two intensive outpatient treatment services for deferred prosecution under RCW 10.05.150 must:
(a) Ensure that services include a minimum of seventy-two hours of treatment services within a maximum of twelve weeks, which consist of the following during the first four weeks of treatment:
(i) At least three sessions each week, with each session occurring on separate days of the week;
(ii) Group sessions that must last at least one hour; and
(iii) Attendance at self-help groups in addition to the seventy-two hours of treatment services.
(b) There must be approval, in writing, by the court having jurisdiction in the case, when there is any exception to the requirements in this subsection;
(c) The agency must refer for ongoing treatment or support upon completion of intensive outpatient treatment, as necessary; and
(d) The agency must report noncompliance with the court mandated treatment in accordance with WAC 246-341-0800.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160, 71.24.037 and chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW. WSR 21-12-042, § 246-341-0740, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-0740, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.]



PDF246-341-0742

Outpatient servicesSubstance use disorder assessment only services.

Substance use disorder assessment only services are provided to an individual to determine the individual's involvement with alcohol and other drugs and determine the appropriate course of care or referral.
(1) A behavioral health agency certified for assessment only services may choose to become certified to also provide driving under the influence (DUI) assessment services described in WAC 246-341-0820.
(2) An agency providing assessment only services:
(a) Must review, evaluate, and document information provided by the individual;
(b) May include information from external sources such as family, support individuals, legal entities, courts, and employers; and
(c) Is not required to meet the individual service plan requirements in WAC 246-341-0640.
(3) An agency must maintain and provide a list of resources, including self-help groups, and referral options that can be used by staff members to refer an individual to appropriate services.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160, 71.24.037 and chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW. WSR 21-12-042, § 246-341-0742, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-0742, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.]



PDF246-341-0744

Outpatient servicesInformation and assistance servicesSubstance use disorder services—General.

Information and assistance services are considered nontreatment substance use disorder services provided to support an individual who has a need for interventions related to substance use.
(1) Information and assistance services include:
(a) Alcohol and drug information school;
(b) Information and crisis services; and
(c) Emergency service patrol.
(2) Substance use disorder information and assistance services are not required to meet the requirements under WAC 246-341-0640.
(3) An agency providing information and assistance services must maintain and provide a list of resources, including self-help groups and referral options, that can be used by staff members to refer an individual to appropriate services.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160, 71.24.037 and chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW. WSR 21-12-042, § 246-341-0744, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-0744, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.]



PDF246-341-0746

Outpatient servicesSubstance use disorder information and assistance servicesAlcohol and drug information school.

Alcohol and drug information school services provide an educational program about substance use. These services are for an individual referred by a court or other jurisdiction(s) who may have been assessed and determined not to require treatment. An agency providing alcohol and drug information school services must:
(1) Ensure courses are taught by a substance use disorder professional, a substance use disorder professional trainee, or a person who has received documented training in:
(a) Effects of alcohol and other drugs;
(b) Patterns of use;
(c) Current laws and regulations pertaining to substance use violations, and consequences of the violations; and
(d) Available resources and referral options for additional services that may be appropriate for the individual.
(2) Ensure the curriculum:
(a) Provides no less than eight hours of instruction for each course;
(b) Includes a post-test for each course after the course is completed;
(c) Includes a certificate of completion; and
(d) Covers the following topics:
(i) Information about the effects of alcohol and other drugs;
(ii) Patterns of use; and
(iii) Current laws, including Washington state specific laws and regulations, and consequences related to substance use violations.
(3) Ensure each student be advised that there is no assumption the student has a substance use disorder and that the course is not a therapy session;
(4) Ensure each individual student record contains:
(a) An intake form, including demographics;
(b) The hours of attendance, including dates; and
(c) A copy of the scored post-test.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160, 71.24.037 and chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW. WSR 21-12-042, § 246-341-0746, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-0746, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.]



PDF246-341-0748

Outpatient servicesSubstance use disorder information and assistanceInformation and crisis services.

Substance use disorder information and crisis services provide an individual assistance or guidance related to substance use disorders, twenty-four hours a day by telephone or in person. An agency providing information and crisis services must:
(1) Have services available to any individual twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week;
(2) Ensure each staff member completes forty hours of training that covers substance use disorders before assigning the staff member unsupervised duties;
(3) Ensure a substance use disorder professional or a substance use disorder professional trainee is available or on staff twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week;
(4) Maintain a current directory of all certified substance use disorder service providers in the state; and
(5) Maintain a current list of local resources for legal, employment, education, interpreter, and social and health services.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160, 71.24.037 and chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW. WSR 21-12-042, § 246-341-0748, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-0748, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.]



PDF246-341-0750

Outpatient servicesSubstance use disorder information and assistanceEmergency service patrol.

Emergency service patrol services provide transport assistance to an intoxicated individual in a public place when a request has been received from police, merchants, or other persons. An agency providing emergency service patrol services must:
(1) Ensure the staff member providing the service:
(a) Has proof of a valid Washington state driver's license;
(b) Possesses annually updated verification of first-aid and cardiopulmonary resuscitation training; and
(c) Has completed forty hours of training in substance use disorder crisis intervention techniques and alcoholism and drug abuse, to improve skills in handling crisis situations.
(2) Respond to calls from police, merchants, and other persons for assistance with an intoxicated individual in a public place;
(3) Patrol assigned areas and give assistance to an individual intoxicated in a public place;
(4) Conduct a preliminary screening of an individual's condition related to the state of their impairment and presence of a physical condition needing medical attention;
(5) Transport the individual to their home or shelter or to a substance use disorder treatment program if the individual is intoxicated, but subdued and willing to be transported;
(6) Make reasonable efforts to take the individual into protective custody and transport the individual to an appropriate treatment or health care facility, when the individual is incapacitated, unconscious, or has threatened or inflicted harm on another person;
(7) Call law enforcement for assistance if the individual is unwilling to be taken into protective custody; and
(8) Maintain a log, including:
(a) The date, time and origin of each call received for assistance;
(b) The time of arrival at the scene;
(c) The location of the individual at the time of the assist;
(d) The name of the individual transported;
(e) The results of the preliminary screening;
(f) The destination and address of the transport and time of arrival; and
(g) In case of nonpickup of a person, documentation of why the pickup did not occur.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160, 71.24.037 and chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW. WSR 21-12-042, § 246-341-0750, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-0750, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.]



PDF246-341-0754

Outpatient servicesProblem gambling and gambling disorder services.

(1) Each agency licensed by the department to provide problem gambling and gambling disorder services that includes diagnostic screening and assessment, and individual, group, couples, and family counseling and case management must ensure the following requirements are met:
(a) Meet the behavioral health agency licensure, certification, administration, personnel, and clinical requirements in WAC 246-341-0300 through 246-341-0650;
(b) Be a problem gambling certified agency with the department;
(c) Maintain a list of resources, including self-help groups, and referral options that can be used by staff to refer an individual to appropriate services; and
(d) Maintain a written procedure for the response to medical and psychiatric emergencies.
(2) An agency certified to provide problem gambling and gambling disorder services must ensure:
(a) All problem gambling and gambling disorder treatment services are provided by:
(i) An individual credentialed by the department under chapter 18.19, 18.83, or 18.225 RCW and is a certified Washington state, national, or international gambling counselor; or
(ii) An individual credentialed by the department under chapter 18.19, 18.83, or 18.225 RCW, under the supervision of a certified gambling counselor, and in training to become a certified gambling counselor.
(b) Before providing problem gambling and gambling disorder treatment services, an individual in training to become a certified gambling counselor must have a minimum of:
(i) At least one thousand five hundred hours of professionally supervised postlicensure, postcertification, or postregistration experience providing mental health or substance use disorder treatment services; and
(ii) Thirty hours of unduplicated gambling specific training, including the basic training. One of the following state, national, or international organizations must approve the requirements of certification training:
(A) The Washington state gambling counselor certification committee is an independent body comprised of certified gambling counselors and advisory members as deemed appropriate by the committee and is responsible for determining the training and continuing education requirements for gambling counselor certification and gambling counselor supervision and any additional requirements not otherwise specified here;
(B) National or international gambling counselor certification board; or
(C) The health care authority problem gambling program.
(c) An individual who meets subsection (3) of this section must complete training within two years of acceptance to the certification program to become a certified gambling counselor;
(d) All staff members in training to become a certified gambling counselor must receive clinical supervision. The clinical supervisor must:
(i) Hold a valid international gambling counselor certification board-approved clinical consultant credential, a valid Washington state certified gambling counselor II certification credential, or a valid national certified gambling counselor II certification credential; and
(ii) Complete training requirements on problem gambling and gambling disorder specific clinical supervision approved by a state, national, or international organization including, but not limited to, the:
(A) Washington state gambling counselor certification committee;
(B) National or international gambling counselor certification board; or
(C) The health care authority problem gambling program.
(3) An agency that provides only problem gambling-related services, including diagnostic screening, brief intervention, case management, referral to certified problem gambling agencies and educational sessions but does not provide problem gambling assessment and treatment is not required to be certified for problem gambling services.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160, 71.24.037 and chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW. WSR 21-12-042, § 246-341-0754, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-0754, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.]



PDF246-341-0800

Involuntary and court-orderedNoncompliance reporting for outpatient court-ordered substance use disorder treatment.

An agency providing substance use disorder services must report noncompliance, in all levels of care, for an individual ordered into substance use disorder treatment by a court of law or other appropriate jurisdictions in accordance with RCW 71.05.445 and chapter 182-538D WAC for individuals receiving court-ordered services under chapter 71.05 RCW, RCW 10.05.090 for individuals under deferred prosecution, or RCW 46.61.5056 for individuals receiving court-ordered treatment for driving under the influence (DUI). Additionally, agencies providing services to individuals under a court-order for deferred prosecution under RCW 10.05.090 RCW or treatment under RCW 46.61.5056 must:
(1) Report and recommend action for emergency noncompliance to the court or other appropriate jurisdiction(s) within three working days from obtaining information on:
(a) An individual's failure to maintain abstinence from alcohol and other nonprescribed drugs as verified by individual's self-report, identified third-party report confirmed by the agency, or blood alcohol content or other laboratory test;
(b) An individual's report of subsequent alcohol or drug related arrests; or
(c) An individual leaving the program against program advice or an individual discharged for rule violation;
(2) Report and recommend action for nonemergency, noncompliance to the court or other appropriate jurisdiction(s) within ten working days from the end of each reporting period, upon obtaining information on:
(a) An individual's unexcused absences or failure to report, including failure to attend mandatory self-help groups; or
(b) An individual's failure to make acceptable progress in any part of the treatment plan.
(3) Transmit information on noncompliance or other significant changes as soon as possible, but no longer than ten working days from the date of the noncompliance, when the court does not wish to receive monthly reports;
(4) Report compliance status of persons convicted under chapter 46.61 RCW to the department of licensing.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160, 71.24.037 and chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW. WSR 21-12-042, § 246-341-0800, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-0800, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.]



PDF246-341-0805

Involuntary and court-orderedOutpatient less restrictive alternative (LRA) or conditional release support behavioral health services.

An agency serving individuals on a less restrictive alternative (LRA) or conditional release court order shall provide or monitor the provision of court-ordered services, including psychiatric, substance use disorder treatment, and medical components of community support services. An agency providing court-ordered LRA support and conditional release services shall:
(1) Have a written policy and procedure that allows for the referral of an individual to an involuntary treatment facility twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week.
(2) Have a written policy and procedure for an individual who requires involuntary detention that includes procedures for:
(a) Contacting the designated crisis responder (DCR) regarding revocations or extension of an LRA or conditional release; and
(b) The transportation of an individual, in a safe and timely manner, for the purpose of:
(i) Evaluation; or
(ii) Evaluation and detention.
(3) Ensure the individual is provided everything their rights afford them to and protect them from under chapter 71.05 or 71.34 RCW, as applicable.
(4) Include in the clinical record a copy of the less restrictive alternative court order or conditional release and a copy of any subsequent modification.
(5) Ensure the individual service plan addresses the conditions of the less restrictive alternative court order or conditional release and a plan for transition to voluntary treatment.
(6) Ensure that the individual receives medication services including an assessment of the need for and prescription of medications to treat mental health or substance use disorders, appropriate to the needs of the individual as follows:
(a) At least one time in the initial fourteen days following release from inpatient treatment for an individual on a ninety-day or one hundred eighty-day less restrictive alternative court order or conditional release, unless the individual's attending physician, physician assistant, or psychiatric advanced registered nurse practitioner (ARNP) determines another schedule is more appropriate and documents the new schedule and the reason(s) in the individual's clinical record; and
(b) At least one time every thirty days for the duration of the less restrictive alternative court order or conditional release, unless the individual's attending physician, physician assistant, or psychiatric ARNP determines another schedule is more appropriate and documents the new schedule and the reason(s) in the individual's clinical record.
(7) Keep a record of the periodic evaluation of each committed individual for release from, or continuation of, an involuntary treatment order. Evaluations must occur at least every thirty days for the duration of the commitments and include documentation of the evaluation and rationale:
(a) For requesting a petition for an additional period of less restrictive or conditional release treatment under an involuntary treatment order; or
(b) Allowing the less restrictive court order or conditional release to expire without an extension request.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160, 71.24.037 and chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW. WSR 21-12-042, § 246-341-0805, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-0805, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.]



PDF246-341-0810

Involuntary and court-orderedDesignated crisis responder (DCR) services.

Designated crisis responder (DCR) services are services provided by a DCR to evaluate an individual in crisis and determine if involuntary services are required. An agency providing DCR services must meet the general requirements for crisis services in WAC 246-341-0900 and must do all of the following:
(1) Ensure that services are provided by a DCR.
(2) Ensure staff members utilize the protocols for DCRs required by RCW 71.05.214.
(3) Document that services provided to the individual were in accordance with the requirements in chapter 71.05 or 71.34 RCW, as applicable.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160, 71.24.037 and chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW. WSR 21-12-042, § 246-341-0810, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-0810, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.]



PDF246-341-0815

Involuntary and court-orderedSubstance use disorder counseling for RCW 46.61.5056.

An agency providing certified substance use disorder counseling services to an individual convicted of driving under the influence or physical control under RCW 46.61.5056 must ensure treatment is completed as follows:
(1) Treatment during the first sixty days must include:
(a) Weekly group or individual substance use disorder counseling sessions according to the individual service plan;
(b) One individual substance use disorder counseling session of not less than thirty minutes duration, excluding the time taken for a substance use disorder assessment, for each individual, according to the individual service plan;
(c) Alcohol and drug basic education for each individual;
(d) Participation in recovery oriented, community-based self-help groups according to the individual service plan. Participation must be documented in the individual's clinical record; and
(e) Individuals who complete intensive inpatient substance use disorder treatment services must attend, at a minimum, weekly outpatient counseling sessions for the remainder of their first sixty days of treatment according to the individual service plan.
(2) The next one hundred twenty days of treatment at a minimum shall include:
(a) Group or individual substance use disorder counseling sessions every two weeks according to the individual service plan;
(b) One individual substance use disorder counseling session of not less than thirty minutes duration, every sixty days according to the individual service plan; and
(c) Referral of each individual for ongoing treatment or support, as necessary, using ASAM criteria, upon completion of one hundred eighty days of treatment.
(3) An individual who is assessed with insufficient evidence of a substance use disorder must be referred to alcohol/drug information school.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160, 71.24.037 and chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW. WSR 21-12-042, § 246-341-0815, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-0815, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.]



PDF246-341-0820

Involuntary and court-orderedDriving under the influence (DUI) substance use disorder assessment services.

Driving under the influence (DUI) assessment services, as defined in chapter 46.61 RCW, are provided to an individual to determine the individual's involvement with alcohol and other drugs and determine the appropriate course of care or referral.
(1) An agency certified to provide DUI assessment services:
(a) Must review, evaluate, and document information provided by the individual;
(b) May include in the assessment information from external sources such as family, support individuals, legal entities, courts, and employers;
(c) Is not required to meet the individual service plan requirements in WAC 246-341-0640 (1)(d); and
(d) Must maintain and provide a list of resources, including self-help groups, and referral options that can be used by staff members to refer an individual to appropriate services.
(2) An agency certified to provide DUI assessment services must also ensure:
(a) The assessment is conducted in person; and
(b) The individual has a summary included in the assessment that evaluates the individual's:
(i) Blood or breath alcohol level and other drug levels, or documentation of the individual's refusal at the time of the arrest, if available; and
(ii) Self-reported driving record and the abstract of the individual's legal driving record.
(3) When the assessment findings do not result in a substance use disorder diagnosis, the assessment must also include:
(a) A copy of the police report;
(b) A copy of the court originated criminal case history;
(c) The results of a urinalysis or drug testing obtained at the time of the assessment; and
(d) A referral to alcohol and drug information school.
(4) If the information in subsection (3)(a) through (d) of this section is required and not readily available, the record must contain documentation of attempts to obtain the information.
(5) Upon completion of the DUI assessment, the individual must be:
(a) Informed of the results of the assessment; and
(b) Referred to the appropriate level of care according to ASAM criteria.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160, 71.24.037 and chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW. WSR 21-12-042, § 246-341-0820, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-0820, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.]



PDF246-341-0900

Crisis mental health servicesGeneral.

Crisis mental health services are intended to stabilize an individual in crisis to prevent further deterioration, provide immediate treatment and intervention in a location best suited to meet the needs of the individual, and provide treatment services in the least restrictive environment available.
(1) Crisis services include:
(a) Crisis telephone support;
(b) Crisis outreach services; and
(c) Crisis stabilization services.
(2) An agency providing crisis mental health services does not need to meet the requirements in WAC 246-341-0640.
(3) An agency providing any crisis mental health service must:
(a) Require that trained staff remain, in person or on the phone, with the individual in crisis in order to provide stabilization and support until the crisis is resolved or referral to another service is accomplished;
(b) Determine if an individual has a crisis plan and request a copy if available;
(c) As appropriate, refer individuals to voluntary or involuntary treatment facilities for admission on a seven-day-a-week, twenty-four-hour-a-day basis, including arrangements for contacting the designated crisis responder;
(d) Transport or arrange for transport of an individual in a safe and timely manner, when necessary;
(e) Be available twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week, unless providing only crisis stabilization services; and
(f) Include family members, significant others, and other relevant treatment providers, as necessary, to provide support to the individual in crisis.
(4) When services are provided in a private home or nonpublic setting the agency must:
(a) Have a written plan for training, staff back-up, information sharing, and communication for staff members who respond to a crisis in an individual's personal residence or in a nonpublic setting;
(b) Ensure that a staff member responding to a crisis is able to be accompanied by a second trained individual when services are provided in the individual's personal residence or other nonpublic location;
(c) Ensure that any staff member who engages in home visits is provided access, by their employer, to a wireless telephone or comparable device for the purpose of emergency communication as described in RCW 71.05.710;
(d) Provide staff members who are sent to a private home or other private location to evaluate an individual in crisis prompt access to information about any history of dangerousness or potential dangerousness on the individual they are being sent to evaluate that is documented in a crisis plan(s) or commitment record(s). This information must be made available without unduly delaying the crisis response.
(5) Documentation of a crisis service must include the following, as applicable to the crisis service provided:
(a) A brief summary of each crisis service encounter, including the date, time, and duration of the encounter;
(b) The names of the participants;
(c) A follow-up plan or disposition, including any referrals for services, including emergency medical services;
(d) Whether the individual has a crisis plan and any request to obtain the crisis plan; and
(e) The name and credential of the staff person providing the service.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160, 71.24.037 and chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW. WSR 21-12-042, § 246-341-0900, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-0900, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.]



PDF246-341-0905

Crisis mental health servicesTelephone support services.

Mental health telephone support services are services provided as a means of first contact to an individual in crisis. These services may include de-escalation and referral.
(1) An agency certified to provide telephone support services must assure communication and coordination with the individual's mental health care provider, if indicated and appropriate.
(2) An agency providing telephone services only is not required to follow the consultation requirement in WAC 246-341-0515(3).
[Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160, 71.24.037 and chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW. WSR 21-12-042, § 246-341-0905, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-0905, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.]



PDF246-341-0910

Crisis mental health servicesOutreach services.

Crisis mental health outreach services are face-to-face intervention services provided to assist individuals in a community setting. A community setting can be an individual's home, an emergency room, a nursing facility, or other private or public location.
(1) An agency certified to provide crisis outreach services must:
(a) Provide crisis telephone screening.
(b) Ensure face-to-face outreach services are provided by a mental health professional or a department-credentialed staff person with documented training in crisis response.
(c) Resolve the crisis in the least restrictive manner possible.
(2) An agency utilizing certified peer counselors to provide crisis outreach services must:
(a) Ensure services are provided by a person recognized by the health care authority as a peer counselor, as defined in WAC 246-341-0200;
(b) Ensure services provided by a peer counselor are within the scope of the peer counselor's training and credential;
(c) Ensure that a peer counselor responding to an initial crisis visit is accompanied by a mental health professional;
(d) Develop and implement policies and procedures for determining when peer counselors may provide follow-up crisis outreach services without being accompanied by a mental health professional; and
(e) Ensure peer counselors receive annual training that is relevant to their unique working environment.
(3) In addition to the documentation requirements in WAC 246-341-0900, documentation must include:
(a) The nature of the crisis;
(b) The time elapsed from the initial contact to the face-to-face response;
(c) The outcome, including the basis for a decision not to respond in person.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160, 71.24.037 and chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW. WSR 21-12-042, § 246-341-0910, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-0910, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.]



PDF246-341-0915

Crisis mental health servicesStabilization services.

Crisis mental health stabilization services include short-term (less than two weeks per episode) face-to-face assistance with life skills training and understanding of medication effects on an individual. Stabilization services may be provided to an individual as a follow-up to crisis services provided or to any individual determined by a mental health professional to need stabilization services.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160, 71.24.037 and chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW. WSR 21-12-042, § 246-341-0915, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-0915, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.]



PDF246-341-1000

Opioid treatment programs (OTP)General.

(1) Opioid treatment programs (OTP) may order, possess, dispense, and administer medications approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of opioid use disorder, alcohol use disorder, tobacco use disorder, and reversal of opioid overdose. OTP services include withdrawal management and maintenance treatment along with evidence-based therapy.
(2) An agency providing opioid treatment program services must ensure that the agency's individual record system complies with all federal and state reporting requirements relevant to opioid drugs approved for use in treatment of opioid use disorder, alcohol use disorder, tobacco use disorder, and reversal of opioid overdose.
(3) An agency must:
(a) Use evidence-based therapy in addition to medication in the treatment program;
(b) Identify individual mental health needs during assessment process and refer them to appropriate treatment if not available on-site;
(c) Provide education to each individual admitted, totaling no more than fifty percent of treatment services, on:
(i) Alcohol, other drugs, and substance use disorder;
(ii) Relapse prevention;
(iii) Infectious diseases including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis A, B, and C;
(iv) Sexually transmitted infections; and
(v) Tuberculosis (TB);
(d) Provide information to each individual on:
(i) Emotional, physical, and sexual abuse;
(ii) Nicotine use disorder;
(iii) The impact of substance use during pregnancy, risks to the developing fetus before prescribing any medications to treat opioid use disorder, the risks to both the expecting parent and fetus of not treating opioid use disorder, and the importance of informing medical practitioners of substance use during pregnancy; and
(iv) Family planning.
(e) Create and implement policies and procedures for:
(i) Diversion control that contains specific measures to reduce the possibility of the diversion of controlled substances from legitimate treatment use, and assign specific responsibility to the medical and administrative staff members for carrying out the described diversion control measures and functions;
(ii) Urinalysis and drug testing, to include:
(A) Obtaining specimen samples from each individual, at least eight times within twelve consecutive months;
(B) Documentation indicating the clinical need for additional urinalysis;
(C) Random samples, without notice to the individual;
(D) Samples in a therapeutic manner that minimizes falsification;
(E) Observed samples, when clinically appropriate; and
(F) Samples handled through proper chain of custody techniques.
(iii) Laboratory testing;
(iv) The response to medical and psychiatric emergencies; and
(v) Verifying the identity of an individual receiving treatment services, including maintaining a file in the dispensary with a photograph of the individual and updating the photographs when the individual's physical appearance changes significantly.
(4) An agency must ensure that an individual is not admitted to opioid treatment withdrawal management services more than two times in a twelve-month period following admission to services.
(5) An agency providing services to a pregnant woman must have a written procedure to address specific issues regarding their pregnancy and prenatal care needs, and to provide referral information to applicable resources.
(6) An agency providing youth opioid treatment program services must:
(a) Ensure that before admission the youth has had two documented attempts at short-term withdrawal management or drug-free treatment within a twelve-month period, with a waiting period of no less than seven days between the first and second short-term withdrawal management treatment; and
(b) Ensure that when a youth is admitted for maintenance treatment, written consent by a parent or if applicable, legal guardian or responsible adult designated by the relevant state authority, is obtained.
(7) An agency providing opioid treatment program services must ensure:
(a) That notification to the federal Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) and the department is made within three weeks of any replacement or other change in the status of the program, program sponsor as defined in 42 C.F.R. Part 8, or medical director;
(b) Treatment is provided to an individual in compliance with 42 C.F.R. Part 8;
(c) The individual record system complies with all federal and state reporting requirements relevant to opioid drugs approved for use in treatment of opioid use disorder; and
(d) The death of an individual enrolled in an opioid treatment program is reported to the department within forty-eight hours.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160, 71.24.037 and chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW. WSR 21-12-042, § 246-341-1000, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-1000, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.]



PDF246-341-1005

Opioid treatment programs (OTP)Agency certification requirements.

An agency applying to provide opioid treatment program services must:
(1) Submit to the department documentation that the agency has communicated with the county legislative authority and if applicable, the city legislative authority or tribal authority, in order to secure a location for the new opioid treatment program that meets county, tribal or city land use ordinances.
(2) Ensure that a community relations plan developed and completed in consultation with the county, city, or tribal authority or their designee, in order to minimize the impact of the opioid treatment programs upon the business and residential neighborhoods in which the program is located. A community relations plan is a plan to minimize the impact of an opioid treatment program as defined by the Center for Substance Abuse Guidelines for the Accreditation of Opioid Treatment Programs, section 2.C.(4). The plan must include:
(a) Documentation of the strategies used to:
(i) Obtain stakeholder input regarding the proposed location;
(ii) Address any concerns identified by stakeholders; and
(iii) Develop an ongoing community relations plan to address new concerns expressed by stakeholders.
(b) For new applicants who operate opioid treatment programs in another state, copies of all review reports written by their national accreditation body and state certification, if applicable, within the past six years.
(3) Have concurrent approval to provide an opioid treatment program by:
(a) The Washington state department of health pharmacy quality assurance commission;
(b) The United States Center for Substance Abuse Treatment (CSAT), Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration (SAMHSA), as required by 42 C.F.R. Part 8 for certification as an opioid treatment program; and
(c) The United States Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA).
(4) An agency must ensure that the opioid treatment program is provided to an individual in compliance with the applicable requirements in 42 C.F.R. Part 8 and 21 C.F.R. Part 1301.
(5) The department may deny an application for certification when the applicant has not demonstrated in the past, the capability to provide the appropriate services to assist individuals using the program to meet goals established by the legislature.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160, 71.24.037 and chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW. WSR 21-12-042, § 246-341-1005, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-1005, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.]



PDF246-341-1010

Opioid treatment programs (OTP)Agency staff requirements.

An agency providing substance use disorder opioid treatment program services must:
(1) Appoint a program sponsor, as defined in 42 C.F.R. Part 8, who is responsible for notifying the United States Center for Substance Abuse Treatment (CSAT), Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), the United States Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), the department, and the Washington pharmacy quality assurance commission of any theft or significant loss of a controlled substance that resulted in filing a DEA Form 106.
(2) Ensure there is an appointed medical director, as defined in 42 C.F.R. Part 8, who:
(a) Is licensed by the department under chapter 18.57 RCW or the Washington medical commission under chapter 18.71 RCW to practice medicine and practices within their scope of practice;
(b) Is responsible for all medical services performed;
(c) Ensures all medical services provided are in compliance with applicable federal, state, and local rules and laws.
(3) Ensure at least one staff member has documented training in:
(a) Family planning;
(b) Prenatal health care; and
(c) Parenting skills.
(4) Ensure that at least one staff member is on duty at all times who has documented training in:
(a) Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR); and
(b) Management of opioid overdose.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160, 71.24.037 and chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW. WSR 21-12-042, § 246-341-1010, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-1010, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.]



PDF246-341-1015

Opioid treatment programs (OTP)Clinical record content and documentation requirements.

An agency providing opioid treatment program services must maintain an individual's clinical record. The clinical record must contain:
(1) Documentation that the agency made a good faith effort to review if the individual is enrolled in any other opioid treatment program and take appropriate action;
(2) Documentation that the individual received a copy of the rules and responsibilities for treatment participants, including the potential use of interventions or sanction;
(3) Documentation that the individual service plan was reviewed quarterly and semi-annually after two years of continuous treatment;
(4) Documentation when an individual refuses to provide a drug testing specimen sample. The refusal is considered a positive drug screen specimen;
(5) Documentation in progress notes of timely interventions used to therapeutically address the disclosure of illicit drug use, a positive drug test, or possible diversion of opioid medication, as evidenced by the absence of opioids or related metabolites in drug toxicology test results;
(6) Documentation of all medical services including:
(a) Results of physical examination;
(b) Medical and family history;
(c) Nursing notes;
(d) Laboratory reports including results of regular toxicology screens, a problem list, and list of medications updated as clinically indicated; and
(e) Progress notes including documentation of all medications and dosages, if available.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160, 71.24.037 and chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW. WSR 21-12-042, § 246-341-1015, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-1015, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.]



PDF246-341-1020

Opioid treatment programs (OTP)Medical director responsibility.

An agency providing substance use disorder opioid treatment program services must ensure the program physician, or the medical practitioner under supervision of the medical director, performs and meets the following:
(1) The program physician or medical practitioner under supervision of the medical director:
(a) Is responsible to verify an individual is currently addicted to an opioid drug and that the individual became addicted at least twelve months before admission to treatment; or
(b) May waive the twelve month requirement in (a) of this subsection upon receiving documentation that the individual:
(i) Was released from a penal institution, if the release was within the previous six months;
(ii) Is pregnant; or
(iii) Was previously treated within the previous twenty-four months.
(2) A documented physical evaluation must be completed on the individual before admission and before starting medications approved to treat opioid use disorder that includes the determination of opioid use disorder consistent with the current and applicable Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) criteria;
(3) A documented review of the department prescription drug monitoring program data on the individual:
(a) At admission;
(b) Annually after the date of admission; and
(c) Subsequent to any incidents of concern.
(4) All relevant facts concerning the use of the opioid drug must be clearly and adequately explained to each individual;
(5) Current written and verbal information must be provided to pregnant individuals, before the initial prescribed dosage regarding:
(a) The concerns of possible substance use disorder, health risks, and benefits the opioid treatment medication may have on the individual and the developing fetus;
(b) The risk of not initiating opioid treatment medication on the individual and the developing fetus;
(c) The potential need for the newborn baby to be treated in a hospital setting or in a specialized support environment designed to address and manage neonatal opioid or other drug withdrawal syndromes; and
(d) Referral options to address and manage neonatal opioid or other drug withdrawal syndromes.
(6) Each individual voluntarily choosing to receive maintenance treatment must sign an informed consent to treatment;
(7) Within fourteen days of admission, a medical examination must be completed that includes:
(a) Documentation of the results of serology and other tests, as determined by the medical practitioner; and
(b) A documented assessment for the appropriateness of Sunday and holiday take-home medications as required by 42 C.F.R. Part 8.12(i).
(8) When exceptional circumstances exist for an individual to be enrolled with more than one opioid treatment program agency, justification granting permission must be documented in the individual's clinical record at each agency;
(9) Each individual admitted to withdrawal management services must have an approved withdrawal management schedule that is medically appropriate;
(10) Each individual administratively discharged from services must have an approved withdrawal management schedule that is medically appropriate;
(11) An assessment for other forms of treatment must be completed for each individual who has two or more unsuccessful withdrawal management episodes within twelve consecutive months; and
(12) An annual medical examination must be completed on each individual that includes the individual's overall physical condition and response to medication.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160, 71.24.037 and chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW. WSR 21-12-042, § 246-341-1020, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-1020, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.]



PDF246-341-1025

Opioid treatment programs (OTP)Medication management.

An agency providing opioid treatment program services must ensure the medication management requirements in this section are met.
(1) An agency must use only those opioid treatment medications that are approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration under section 505 of the United States Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (21 U.S.C. 355) for use in the treatment of opioid use disorder.
(2) An agency providing opioid treatment program services must ensure that initial dosing requirements are met as follows:
(a) Methadone must be administered or dispensed only in oral form and is formulated in such a way as to reduce its potential for parenteral abuse;
(b) The initial dose of methadone must not exceed thirty milligrams and the total dose for the first day must not exceed forty milligrams, unless the program physician documents in the individual's record that forty milligrams did not suppress opioid abstinence symptoms; and
(c) The establishment of the initial dose must consider:
(i) Signs and symptoms of withdrawal;
(ii) Individual comfort; and
(iii) Side effects from over medication.
(3) An agency providing an opioid treatment program services must ensure that:
(a) Each opioid treatment medication used by the program is administered and dispensed in accordance with its approved product labeling;
(b) Each individual admitted to an opioid treatment program shall receive overdose prevention education and information on how to access opioid overdose reversal medication;
(c) All dosing and administration decisions are made by a:
(i) Program physician; or
(ii) Medical practitioner under supervision of a program physician familiar with the most up-to-date product labeling.
(d) Any significant deviations from the approved labeling, including deviations with regard to dose, frequency, or the conditions of use described in the approved labeling, are specifically documented in the individual's record.
(4) An agency providing opioid treatment program services must ensure that all take-home medications are:
(a) Consistent with 42 C.F.R. Part 8.12 (i)(1) through (5) and are authorized only to stable individuals who:
(i) Have received opioid treatment medication for a minimum of ninety days; and
(ii) Have not had any positive drug screens in the last sixty days.
(b) Assessed and authorized, as appropriate, for a Sunday or legal holiday as identified in RCW 1.16.050;
(c) Assessed and authorized, as appropriate, when travel to the facility presents a safety risk for an individual or staff member due to inclement weather; and
(d) Not allowed in short-term withdrawal management or interim maintenance treatment.
(5) Registered nurses and licensed practical nurses may dispense up to a thirty-one day supply of medications approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of opioid use disorder under an order or prescription.
(6) All exceptions to take-home requirements must be submitted and approved by the state opioid treatment authority and Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).
(7) An agency providing opioid treatment program services may accept, possess, and administer patient-owned medications.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160, 71.24.037 and chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW. WSR 21-12-042, § 246-341-1025, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-1025, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.]



PDF246-341-1050

General requirements for mental health and substance use disorder inpatient and residential services.

(1) An agency providing substance use disorder services under WAC 246-341-1100 through 246-341-1114 or mental health services under WAC 246-341-1118 through 246-341-1158:
(a) Must be a facility licensed by the department as:
(i) A hospital licensed under chapter 70.41 RCW;
(ii) A private psychiatric and alcoholism hospital licensed under chapter 71.12 RCW;
(iii) A private alcohol and substance use disorder hospital licensed under chapter 71.12 RCW; or
(iv) A residential treatment facility licensed under chapter 71.12 RCW;
(b) If an agency is providing seclusion and restraint the agency must ensure that use of seclusion and restraint is documented and is used only to the extent necessary to ensure the safety of patients and others, and in accordance with WAC 246-320-226, 246-322-180, 246-324-200, or 246-337-110, as determined by the facility license type;
(c) Must ensure access to necessary medical treatment, including emergency life-sustaining treatment and medication;
(d) Must review the individual's crisis or recovery plan, if applicable and available;
(e) Must determine the individual's risk of harm to self, others, or property;
(f) Must coordinate with the individual's current treatment provider, if applicable, to assure continuity of care during admission and upon discharge;
(g) Must develop and provide to the individual a discharge summary that must include:
(i) A continuing care recommendation; and
(ii) Scheduled follow-up appointments, including the time and date of the appointment(s), when possible;
(h) If providing services to adults and minors, an agency must:
(i) Ensure that a minor who is at least age thirteen but not yet age eighteen is served with adults only if the minor's clinical record contains:
(A) Documentation that justifies such placement; and
(B) A professional judgment that placement in an inpatient facility that serves adults will not harm the minor;
(ii) Ensure the following for individuals who share a room:
(A) An individual fifteen years of age or younger must not room with an individual eighteen years of age or older;
(B) Anyone under thirteen years of age must be evaluated for clinical appropriateness before being placed in a room with an individual thirteen to sixteen years of age; and
(C) An individual sixteen or seventeen years of age must be evaluated for clinical appropriateness before being placed in a room with an individual eighteen years of age or older.
(2) An agency providing residential or inpatient mental health or substance use disorder services to youth must follow these additional requirements:
(a) Allow communication between the youth and the youth's parent or if applicable, a legal guardian, and facilitate the communication when clinically appropriate.
(b) Notify the parent or legal guardian within two hours of any significant decrease in the behavioral or physical health status of the youth and document all notification and attempts of notification in the clinical record.
(c) Discharge the youth to the care of the youth's parent or if applicable, legal guardian. For an unplanned discharge and when the parent or legal guardian is not available, the agency must contact the state child protective services.
(d) Ensure a staff member who demonstrates knowledge of adolescent development and substance use disorders is available at the agency or available by phone.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160, 71.24.037 and chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW. WSR 21-12-042, § 246-341-1050, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21.]



PDF246-341-1060

General requirements for mental health and substance use disorder inpatient and residential services providing services under chapter 71.05 or 71.34 RCW.

This section applies to agencies providing secure withdrawal management, evaluation and treatment, involuntary crisis stabilization unit, and involuntary triage services.
(1) An agency providing services under chapter 71.05 or 71.34 RCW must:
(a) Follow the applicable statutory requirements in chapter 71.05 or 71.34 RCW;
(b) Ensure that services are provided in a secure environment. "Secure" means having:
(i) All doors and windows leading to the outside locked at all times;
(ii) Visual monitoring, in a method appropriate to the individual;
(iii) A space to separate persons who are violent or may become violent from others when necessary to maintain safety of the individual and others;
(iv) The means to contact law enforcement immediately in the event of an elopement from the facility; and
(v) Adequate numbers of staff present at all times that are trained in facility security measures;
(c) Provide services, including admissions, seven days a week, twenty-four hours a day;
(d) Ensure that a mental health professional, substance use disorder professional, if appropriate, and physician, physician assistant, or psychiatric advanced registered nurse practitioner (ARNP) are available twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week for consultation and communication with the staff that provide direct care of individuals;
(e) Ensure at least daily contact between each involuntary individual and a mental health professional, substance use disorder professional, or person with a co-occurring disorder specialist enhancement as appropriate, for the purpose of evaluation as to:
(i) The need for further treatment;
(ii) Whether there is a change in involuntary status; or
(iii) Possible discharge;
(f) For an individual who has been delivered to the facility by a peace officer for evaluation the clinical record must contain:
(i) A statement of the circumstances under which the individual was brought to the unit;
(ii) The admission date and time;
(iii) Determination of whether to refer to a designated crisis responder (DCR) to initiate civil commitment proceedings;
(iv) If evaluated by a DCR, documentation that the evaluation was performed within the required time period, the results of the evaluation, and the disposition of the person.
(2) Upon discharge of the individual the agency shall provide notification to the DCR office responsible for the initial commitment, which may be a federally recognized Indian tribe or other Indian health care provider if the DCR is appointed by the health care authority, and the DCR office that serves the county in which the individual is expected to reside.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160, 71.24.037 and chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW. WSR 21-12-042, § 246-341-1060, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21.]



PDF246-341-1070

Inpatient and residential substance use disorder servicesGeneral.

(1) An agency providing substance use disorder withdrawal management, secure withdrawal management, or residential substance use disorder services to an individual must:
(a) Inform individuals of their treatment options so they can make individualized choices for their treatment. This includes, as applicable, the initiation, continuation, or discontinuation of medications for substance use disorders.
(b) For individuals choosing to initiate or continue medications for their substance use disorder, make available on-site or facilitate off-site access to continue or initiate Federal Drug Administration (FDA)-approved medication for any substance use disorder, when clinically appropriate as determined by a medical practitioner.
(c) Provide continuity of care that allows individuals to receive timely and appropriate follow-up services upon discharge and, if applicable, allows the individual to continue medications with no missed doses.
(d) Document in the clinical record:
(i) The individual being informed of their treatment options including the use of medications for substance use disorder;
(ii) The continuation or initiation of FDA-approved medication for substance use disorder treatment that has been provided on-site or facilitated off-site, if applicable;
(iii) Referrals made to behavioral health providers including documentation that a discharge summary was provided to the receiving behavioral health provider as allowed under 42 C.F.R. Part 2; and
(iv) Contact or attempts to follow up with the individual post-discharge including the date of correspondence.
(2) An agency may not deny admission based solely on an individual taking FDA-approved medications, under the supervision of a medical provider, for their substance use disorder or require titration of dosages in order to be admitted or remain in the program.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160, 71.24.037 and chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW. WSR 21-12-042, § 246-341-1070, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21.]



PDF246-341-1100

Withdrawal management services.

Substance use disorder withdrawal management services are provided to a voluntary individual to assist in the process of withdrawal from psychoactive substances in a safe and effective manner.
(1) An agency must:
(a) Ensure the individual receives a substance use disorder screening before admission;
(b) Provide counseling to each individual that addresses the individual's:
(i) Substance use disorder and motivation; and
(ii) Continuing care needs and need for referral to other services.
(c) Maintain a list of resources and referral options that can be used by staff members to refer an individual to appropriate services; and
(d) Post any rules and responsibilities for individuals receiving treatment, including information on potential use of increased motivation interventions or sanctions, in a public place in the facility.
(2) Ensure that each staff member providing withdrawal management services to an individual, with the exception of substance use disorder professionals, substance use disorder professional trainees, physicians, physician assistants, advanced registered nurse practitioners, or person with a co-occurring disorder specialist enhancement, completes a minimum of forty hours of documented training before being assigned individual care duties. This personnel training must include the following topics:
(a) Substance use disorders;
(b) Infectious diseases, to include hepatitis and tuberculosis (TB); and
(c) Withdrawal screening, admission, and signs of trauma.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160, 71.24.037 and chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW. WSR 21-12-042, § 246-341-1100, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-1100, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.]



PDF246-341-1104

Secure withdrawal management and stabilization services.

Secure withdrawal management and stabilization services are provided to a voluntary or involuntary individual to assist in the process of withdrawal from psychoactive substances in a safe and effective manner, or medically stabilize an individual after acute intoxication, in accordance with chapters 71.05 and 71.34 RCW.
(1) An agency must meet the requirements for withdrawal management services in WAC 246-341-1100.
(2) An agency certified to provide secure withdrawal management and stabilization services must develop and implement policies and procedures to assure that a substance use disorder professional and licensed physician, physician assistant, or advanced registered nurse practitioner are available twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week for consultation and communication with the staff that provide direct care to individuals.
(3) An agency providing secure withdrawal management and stabilization services must document that each individual has received necessary screenings, assessments, examinations, or evaluations to determine the nature of the disorder and the treatment necessary, including:
(a) A telephone screening reviewed by a nurse, as defined in chapter 18.79 RCW, or medical practitioner prior to admission that includes current level of intoxication, available medical history, and known medical risks; and
(b) An examination and evaluation in accordance with RCW 71.05.210 within twenty-four hours of admission to the facility.
(4) For individuals admitted to the secure withdrawal management and stabilization facility, the clinical record must contain:
(a) A statement of the circumstances under which the individual was brought to the unit;
(b) The admission date and time;
(c) The date and time when the involuntary detention period ends;
(d) A determination of whether to refer to a DCR to initiate civil commitment proceedings;
(e) If an individual is admitted voluntarily and appears to meet the criteria for initial detention, documentation that an evaluation was performed by a DCR within the time period required in RCW 71.05.050, the results of the evaluation, and the disposition; and
(f) Review of the admission diagnosis and what information the determination was based upon.
(5) An agency certified to provide secure withdrawal management and stabilization services must ensure the treatment plan includes all of the following:
(a) A protocol for safe and effective withdrawal management, including medications as appropriate;
(b) Discharge assistance provided by substance use disorder professionals or persons with a co-occurring disorder specialist enhancement, including facilitating transitions to appropriate voluntary or involuntary inpatient services or to less restrictive alternatives as appropriate for the individual.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160, 71.24.037 and chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW. WSR 21-12-042, § 246-341-1104, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-1104, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.]



PDF246-341-1108

Residential substance use disorder treatment servicesGeneral.

Residential substance use disorder treatment services provide substance use disorder treatment for an individual in a facility with twenty-four hours a day supervision.
(1) Residential treatment services include:
(a) Intensive inpatient services;
(b) Low intensity (recovery house) residential treatment services; and
(c) Long-term residential treatment services.
(2) An agency certified to provide residential treatment services must:
(a) Provide education to each individual admitted to the treatment facility on:
(i) Substance use disorders;
(ii) Relapse prevention;
(iii) Bloodborne pathogens;
(iv) Tuberculosis (TB);
(v) Emotional, physical, and sexual abuse; and
(vi) Nicotine use disorder.
(b) Maintain a list or source of resources, including self-help groups, and referral options that can be used by staff to refer an individual to appropriate services; and
(c) Develop and implement written procedures for:
(i) Urinalysis and drug testing, including laboratory testing; and
(ii) How agency staff members respond to medical and psychiatric emergencies.
(3) An agency that provides services to a pregnant woman must:
(a) Develop and implement a written procedure to address specific issues regarding the woman's pregnancy and prenatal care needs;
(b) Provide referral information to applicable resources; and
(c) Provide education on the impact of substance use during pregnancy, risks to the developing fetus, and the importance of informing medical practitioners of chemical use during pregnancy.
(4) An agency that provides an assessment to an individual under RCW 46.61.5056 must also meet the requirements for driving under the influence (DUI) assessment providers in WAC 246-341-0820.
(5) An agency that provides substance use disorder residential services to youth must:
(a) Ensure staff members are trained in safe and therapeutic techniques for dealing with a youth's behavior and emotional crisis, including:
(i) Verbal deescalation;
(ii) Crisis intervention;
(iii) Anger management;
(vi) Suicide assessment and intervention;
(v) Conflict management and problem solving skills;
(vii) Management of assaultive behavior;
(viii) Proper use of therapeutic physical intervention techniques; and
(ix) Emergency procedures.
(b) Provide group meetings to promote personal growth.
(c) Provide leisure, and other therapy or related activities.
(d) Provide seven or more hours of structured recreation each week, that is led or supervised by staff members.
(e) Provide each youth one or more hours per day, five days each week, of supervised academic tutoring or instruction by a certified teacher when the youth is unable to attend school for an estimated period of four weeks or more. The agency must:
(i) Document the individual's most recent academic placement and achievement level; and
(ii) Obtain school work from the individual's school, or when applicable, provide school work and assignments consistent with the individual's academic level and functioning.
(f) Conduct random and regular room checks when an individual is in their room, and more often when clinically indicated.
(g) Ensure each individual's clinical record:
(i) Contains any consent or release forms signed by the youth and their parent or legal guardian;
(ii) Contains the parent's or other referring person's agreement to participate in the treatment process, as appropriate and if possible; and
(iii) Documents any problems identified in specific youth assessment, including any referrals to school and community support services, on the individual service plan.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160, 71.24.037 and chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW. WSR 21-12-042, § 246-341-1108, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-1108, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.]



PDF246-341-1110

Residential substance use disorder treatment servicesIntensive inpatient services.

(1) Intensive inpatient services are clinically managed, high-intensity substance use disorder residential treatment services that provide a concentrated program of individual and group counseling, education, and activities for an individual who is not in active withdrawal and the individual's family to address overall functioning and to demonstrate aspects of recovery lifestyle.
(2) An agency certified to provide intensive inpatient services must:
(a) Complete the individual service plan within five days of admission;
(b) Conduct and document at least weekly, one face-to-face individual substance use disorder counseling session with the individual; and
(c) Document at least weekly, an individual service plan review which determines continued stay needs and progress towards goals.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160, 71.24.037 and chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW. WSR 21-12-042, § 246-341-1110, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-1110, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.]



PDF246-341-1112

Residential substance use disorder treatment servicesLow intensity (recovery house) residential treatment services.

(1) Low intensity (recovery house) services are clinically managed, low-intensity substance use disorder residential treatment services that provide individualized care and treatment with social, vocational, and recreational activities to aid in individual adjustment to recovery, relapse prevention, recovery skills development, and to aid in job training, employment, or participating in other types of community services.
(2) An agency certified to provide low intensity (recovery house) services must:
(a) Provide no less than five hours per week of treatment services; and
(b) Conduct and document an individual service plan review at least monthly.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160, 71.24.037 and chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW. WSR 21-12-042, § 246-341-1112, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-1112, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.]



PDF246-341-1114

Residential substance use disorder treatment servicesLong-term treatment services.

(1) Long-term treatment services are clinically managed, higher-intensity substance use disorder residential treatment services that provide individualized care and treatment for an individual needing consistent structure over a longer period of time to develop and maintain recovery, develop recovery skills, and to improve overall health.
(2) An agency certified to provide long-term treatment services must:
(a) Provide an individual, during the course of services, with:
(i) Education on social and coping skills, relapse prevention, and recovery skills development;
(ii) Social and recreational activities;
(iii) Assistance in seeking employment, when appropriate; and
(iv) Assistance with reentry living skills to include seeking and obtaining safe housing.
(b) Conduct and document an individual service plan review at least monthly.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160, 71.24.037 and chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW. WSR 21-12-042, § 246-341-1114, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-1114, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.]



PDF246-341-1118

Mental health inpatient servicesGeneral.

(1) Mental health inpatient services include the following types of behavioral health services certified by the department:
(a) Evaluation and treatment services;
(b) Intensive behavioral health treatment services;
(c) Child long-term inpatient program (CLIP);
(d) Crisis stabilization units;
(e) Triage services; and
(f) Competency evaluation and restoration services.
(2) An agency providing mental health inpatient services must develop and implement an individualized annual training plan for agency staff members, to include at least:
(a) Least restrictive alternative options available in the community and how to access them;
(b) Methods of individual care; and
(c) Deescalation training and management of assaultive and self-destructive behaviors, including proper and safe use of seclusion and restraint procedures.
(3) If contract staff are providing direct services, the facility must ensure compliance with the training requirements outlined in subsection (2) of this section.
(4) A behavioral health agency providing mental health inpatient services must:
(a) Document that each individual has received evaluations to determine the nature of the disorder and the treatment necessary, including:
(i) A health assessment of the individual's physical condition to determine if the individual needs to be transferred to an appropriate hospital for treatment;
(ii) Examination and medical evaluation within twenty-four hours of admission by a licensed physician, advanced registered nurse practitioner, or physician assistant;
(iii) Consideration of less restrictive alternative treatment at the time of admission; and
(iv) The admission diagnosis and what information the determination was based upon.
(b) Ensure the rights of individuals to make mental health advance directives, and facility protocols for responding to individual and agent requests consistent with RCW 71.32.150.
(c) Ensure examination and evaluation of a minor by a children's mental health specialist occurs within twenty-four hours of admission.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160, 71.24.037 and chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW. WSR 21-12-042, § 246-341-1118, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: 2019 c 324, RCW 71.24.037, 71.24.648, and 71.24.649. WSR 20-07-091, § 246-341-1118, filed 3/17/20, effective 5/1/20. Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-1118, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.]



PDF246-341-1124

Mental health inpatient servicesRights related to antipsychotic medication.

All individuals have a right to make an informed decision regarding the use of antipsychotic medication consistent with the provisions of RCW 71.05.215 and 71.05.217. The provider must develop and maintain a written protocol for the involuntary administration of antipsychotic medications, including all of the following requirements:
(1) The clinical record must document all of the following:
(a) An attempt to obtain informed consent.
(b) The individual was asked if they wish to decline treatment during the twenty-four hour period prior to any court proceeding wherein the individual has the right to attend and is related to their continued treatment. The answer must be in writing and signed when possible. In the case of a child under the age of eighteen, the psychiatrist, physician assistant working with a supervising psychiatrist, psychiatric advanced registered nurse practitioner, or physician or physician assistant in consultation with a mental health professional with prescriptive authority must be able to explain to the court the probable effects of the medication.
(c) The reasons why any antipsychotic medication is administered over the individual's objection or lack of consent.
(2) The psychiatrist, physician assistant working with a supervising psychiatrist, psychiatric advanced registered nurse practitioner, or physician or physician assistant in consultation with a mental health professional with prescriptive authority may administer antipsychotic medications over an individual's objections or lack of consent only when:
(a) An emergency exists, provided there is a review of this decision by a second psychiatrist, physician assistant working with a supervising psychiatrist, psychiatric advanced registered nurse practitioner, or physician or physician assistant in consultation with a mental health professional with prescriptive authority within twenty-four hours. An emergency exists if all of the following are true:
(i) The individual presents an imminent likelihood of serious harm to self or others;
(ii) Medically acceptable alternatives to administration of antipsychotic medications are not available or are unlikely to be successful; and
(iii) In the opinion of the psychiatrist, physician assistant working with a supervising psychiatrist, psychiatric advanced registered nurse practitioner, or physician or physician assistant in consultation with a mental health professional with prescriptive authority, the individual's condition constitutes an emergency requiring that treatment be instituted before obtaining an additional concurring opinion by a second psychiatrist, physician assistant working with a supervising psychiatrist, psychiatric advanced registered nurse practitioner, or physician or physician assistant in consultation with a mental health professional with prescriptive authority.
(b) There is an additional concurring opinion by a second psychiatrist, physician assistant working with a supervising psychiatrist, psychiatric advanced registered nurse practitioner, or physician or physician assistant in consultation with a mental health professional with prescriptive authority, for treatment up to thirty days.
(c) For continued treatment beyond thirty days through the hearing on any one hundred eighty-day petition filed under RCW 71.05.217, provided the facility medical director or director's medical designee reviews the decision to medicate an individual. Thereafter, antipsychotic medication may be administered involuntarily only upon order of the court. The review must occur at least every sixty days.
(3) The examining psychiatrist, physician assistant working with a supervising psychiatrist, psychiatric advanced registered nurse practitioner, or physician or physician assistant in consultation with a mental health professional with prescriptive authority must sign all one hundred eighty-day petitions for antipsychotic medications filed under the authority of RCW 71.05.217.
(4) Individuals committed for one hundred eighty days who refuse or lack the capacity to consent to antipsychotic medications have the right to a court hearing under RCW 71.05.217 prior to the involuntary administration of antipsychotic medications.
(5) In an emergency, antipsychotic medications may be administered prior to the court hearing provided that an examining psychiatrist, physician assistant working with a supervising psychiatrist, psychiatric advanced registered nurse practitioner, or physician or physician assistant in consultation with a mental health professional with prescriptive authority files a petition for an antipsychotic medication order the next judicial day.
(6) All involuntary medication orders must be consistent with the provisions of RCW 71.05.217, whether ordered by a psychiatrist, physician assistant working with a supervising psychiatrist, psychiatric advanced registered nurse practitioner, or physician or physician assistant in consultation with a mental health professional with prescriptive authority or the court.
[Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-1124, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.]



PDF246-341-1134

Mental health inpatient servicesEvaluation and treatment services.

(1) Evaluation and treatment services are provided for individuals who are held for one hundred twenty-hour detention or on fourteen, ninety, or one hundred eighty-day civil commitment orders according to chapter 71.05 RCW. An agency providing evaluation and treatment services may choose to serve individuals who are held for one hundred twenty-hour detention, or on short-term commitment orders (fourteen-day), long-term commitment orders (ninety-day and one hundred eighty-day), or all three. Agencies providing evaluation and treatment services may also provide services for individuals who are not detained or committed.
(2) An agency certified to provide evaluation and treatment services for youth may provide treatment for a child on a one hundred eighty-day inpatient involuntary commitment order only until the child is discharged from the order to the community, or until a bed is available for that child in a child long-term inpatient treatment facility (CLIP).
[Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160, 71.24.037 and chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW. WSR 21-12-042, § 246-341-1134, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: 2019 c 324, RCW 71.24.037, 71.24.648, and 71.24.649. WSR 20-07-091, § 246-341-1134, filed 3/17/20, effective 5/1/20. Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-1134, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.]



PDF246-341-1137

Behavioral health inpatient servicesIntensive behavioral health treatment services.

(1) Intensive behavioral health treatment services are intended to assist individuals in transitioning to lower levels of care, including individuals on a less restrictive alternative order. These services are provided for individuals with behavioral health conditions whose impairment or behaviors do not meet or no longer meet criteria for involuntary inpatient commitment under chapter 71.05 RCW, but whose care needs cannot be met in other community-based settings due to one or more of the following:
(a) Self-endangering behaviors that are frequent or difficult to manage;
(b) Intrusive behaviors that put residents or staff at risk;
(c) Complex medication needs, which include psychotropic medications;
(d) A history or likelihood of unsuccessful placements in other community facilities or settings such as:
(i) Assisted living facilities licensed under chapters 18.20 RCW and 388-78A WAC;
(ii) Adult family homes licensed under chapters 70.128 RCW and 388-76 WAC;
(iii) Permanent supportive housing provided in accordance with chapter 388-106 WAC;
(iv) Supported living certified under chapter 388-101 WAC; or
(v) Residential treatment facilities licensed under chapters 71.12 RCW and 246-337 WAC providing a lower level of services.
(e) A history of frequent or protracted mental health hospitalizations; or
(f) A history of offenses against a person or felony offenses that cause physical damage to property.
(2) An agency providing intensive behavioral health treatment services must ensure services are provided:
(a) In a residential treatment facility licensed under chapters 71.12 RCW and 246-337 WAC;
(b) By a multidisciplinary team including clinicians, community supports, and those responsible for discharge planning; and
(c) With twenty-four hour observation of individuals by at least two staff who are awake and on duty.
(3) The agency may:
(a) Only admit individuals at least eighteen years of age whose primary care need is treatment for a mental health disorder that does not include a diagnosis of dementia or an organic brain disorder, but may include individuals who have a secondary diagnosis of intellectual or developmental disabilities;
(b) Only admit individuals who are capable of performing activities of daily living without direct assistance from agency staff; and
(c) Not admit individuals with a diagnosis of dementia or an organic brain disorder who can more appropriately be served in an enhanced services facility licensed under chapters 70.97 RCW and 388-107 WAC or other long-term care facility as defined in RCW 70.129.010.
(4) The agency must follow WAC 246-341-0805 regarding less restrictive alternative services.
(5) In addition to the applicable training requirements in this chapter, the agency must train all direct care staff on how to provide services and appropriate care to individuals with intellectual or developmental disabilities as described in Title 71A RCW, including:
(a) An overview of intellectual and developmental disabilities including how to differentiate intellectual or developmental disabilities from mental illness;
(b) Effective communication including methods of verbal and nonverbal communication when supporting individuals with intellectual or developmental disabilities; and
(c) How to identify behaviors in individuals that constitutes "normal stress" and behaviors that constitute a behavioral health crisis.
(6) The agency must develop and implement policies and procedures that explain how the agency will have sufficient numbers of appropriately trained, qualified, or credentialed staff available to safely provide all of the following services in accordance with an individual's care plan and needs:
(a) Planned activities for psychosocial rehabilitation services, including:
(i) Skills training in activities of daily living; skills training may include teaching and prompting or cueing individuals to perform activities, but does not include directly assisting individuals in performing the activities;
(ii) Social interaction;
(iii) Behavioral management, including self-management and understanding of recovery;
(iv) Impulse control;
(v) Training and assistance for self-management of medications; and
(vi) Community integration skills.
(b) Service coordination provided by a mental health professional;
(c) Psychiatric services, including:
(i) Psychiatric nursing, on-site, twenty-four hours per day, seven days per week;
(ii) Timely access to a psychiatrist, psychiatric advanced registered nurse practitioner, or physician's assistant who is licensed under Title 18 RCW operating within their scope of practice who by law can prescribe drugs in Washington state; and
(iii) A mental health professional on site at least eight hours per day and accessible twenty-four hours per day, seven days per week.
(d) Access to intellectual and developmental disability services provided by a disability mental health specialist as described in WAC 182-538D-0200 or a person credentialed to provide applied behavioral analysis; and
(e) Peer support services provided by certified peer counselors.
(7) The agency must provide access to or referral to substance use disorder services, and other specialized services, as needed.
(8) The agency must provide a system or systems within the building that give staff awareness of the movements of individuals within the facility. If a door control system is used, it shall not prevent a resident from leaving the licensed space on their own accord, except temporary delays as allowed by (a) of this subsection. Such systems include:
(a) Limited egress systems consistent with state building code, such as delayed egress;
(b) Appropriate staffing levels to address safety and security; and
(c) Policies and procedures that:
(i) Are consistent with the assessment of the individual's care needs and plan; and
(ii) Do not limit the rights of a voluntary individual.
(9) The agency must have a memorandum of understanding with the local crisis system, including the closest agency providing evaluation and treatment services and designated crisis responders to ensure timely response to and assessment of individuals who need a higher level of care.
(10) The agency must develop and implement policies and procedures regarding discharge and transfer that:
(a) Allows each individual to stay in the facility and not discharge the individual to another facility type or other level of care unless another placement has been secured, and:
(i) The individual completed their care objectives and no longer needs this level of care;
(ii) The individual has medical care needs that the agency cannot provide or needs direct assistance with activities of daily living;
(iii) The individual needs a higher level of behavioral health care, such as evaluation and treatment services, due to a change in behavioral health status or because the individual's conditional release or less restrictive alternative order is revoked; or
(iv) The individual is convicted of any gross misdemeanor or felony while being a resident in the facility where the conviction was based on conduct that caused significant harm to another individual residing in the agency or staff member and there is a likelihood the individual continues to endanger the safety and health of residents or staff. For the purposes of this subsection, conviction includes all instances in which plea of guilty or nolo contendere is the basis for conviction and all proceedings in which the sentence have been deferred or suspended.
(b) Allows individuals who are discharged in accordance with (a)(ii) or (iii) of this subsection to be accepted back into the facility if and when it is medically, clinically, legally, and contractually appropriate;
(c) Allows each individual to stay in the facility and not transfer to another agency providing intensive behavioral health treatment services unless the individual requests to receive services in a different agency certified to provide intensive behavioral health treatment services;
(d) Follows all transfer and discharge documentation requirements in WAC 246-341-0640 and also documents the specific time and date of discharge or transfer. Additionally, the agency must give the following information to the individual, the individual's representative, and family or guardian, as appropriate, before discharge or transfer:
(i) The name, address, and telephone number of the applicable ombuds;
(ii) For individuals with disabilities, the mailing address and telephone number of the agency responsible for the protection and advocacy of developmentally disabled individuals; and
(iii) The mailing address and telephone number of the agency responsible for the protection and advocacy of mentally ill individuals.
(e) Includes transportation coordination that informs all parties involved in the coordination of care.
(11) The agency must protect and promote the rights of each individual and assist the individual to exercise their rights as an individual, as a citizen or resident of the United States and the state of Washington. To do this, the agency must:
(a) Train staff on resident rights and how to assist individuals in exercising their rights;
(b) Protect each individual's right to a dignified existence, self-determination, and communication with and access to persons and services inside and outside the agency;
(c) Post names, addresses, and telephone numbers of the state review and certification agency, the state licensure office, the relevant ombuds programs, and the protection and advocacy systems;
(d) Provide reasonable access to an individual by the individual's representative or an entity or individual that provides health, social, legal, or other services to the individual, subject to the individual's right to deny or withdraw consent at any time;
(e) Allow representatives of appropriate ombuds to examine a resident's clinical records with the permission of the individual or the individual's legal representative, and consistent with state and federal law;
(f) Not require or request individuals to sign waivers of potential liability for losses of personal property or injury, or to sign waivers of individual's rights;
(g) Fully disclose to individuals the agency's policy on accepting medicaid as a payment source; and
(h) Inform the individual both orally and in writing in a language that the individual understands of their applicable rights in accordance with this chapter. The notification must be made upon admission and the agency must document the information was provided.
(12) In addition to all other applicable rights, an individual receiving certified intensive behavioral health treatment services has the right to:
(a) Be free of interference, coercion, discrimination, and reprisal from the agency in exercising their rights;
(b) Choose a representative who may exercise the individual's rights to the extent provided by law;
(c) Manage their own financial affairs;
(d) Personal privacy and confidentiality, including the following considerations:
(i) Personal privacy applies to accommodations, medical treatment, written and telephone communications, personal care, visits, and meetings of family and resident groups.
(ii) The individual may approve or refuse the release of personal and clinical records to an individual outside the agency unless otherwise provided by law.
(iii) Privacy in communications, including the right to:
(A) Send and promptly receive mail that is unopened;
(B) Have access to stationery, postage, and writing implements; and
(C) Have reasonable access to the use of a telephone where calls can be made without being overheard.
(e) Prompt resolution of voiced grievances including those with respect to treatment that has been furnished as well as that which has not been furnished and the behavior of other residents;
(f) File a report with the department for any reason;
(g) Examine the results of the most recent review or inspection of the agency conducted by federal or state reviewers or inspectors and plans of correction in effect with respect to the agency;
(h) Receive information from client advocates, and be afforded the opportunity to contact these advocates;
(i) Access the following without interference:
(i) Any representative of the state;
(ii) The individual's medical provider;
(iii) Ombuds;
(iv) The agencies responsible for the protection and advocacy system for individuals with disabilities, developmental disabilities, and individuals with mental illness created under federal law; and
(v) Subject to reasonable restrictions to protect the rights of others and to the individual's right to deny or withdraw consent at any time, immediate family or other relatives of the individual and others who are visiting with the consent of the resident.
(j) Retain and use personal possessions, including some furnishings, and appropriate clothing, as space permits, unless to do so would infringe upon the rights or health and safety of other residents;
(k) Secure storage, upon request, for small items of personal property;
(l) Be notified regarding transfer or discharge;
(m) Be free from restraint and involuntary seclusion;
(n) Be free from verbal, sexual, physical, and mental abuse, corporal punishment, and involuntary seclusion;
(o) Choose activities, schedules, and health care consistent with the individual's interests, assessments, and plans of care;
(p) Interact with members of the community both inside and outside the agency;
(q) Make choices about aspects of their life in the agency that are significant to the individual;
(r) Unless adjudged incompetent or otherwise found to be legally incapacitated, participate in planning care and treatment or changes in care and treatment;
(s) Unless adjudged incompetent or otherwise found to be legally incapacitated, to direct their own service plan and changes in the service plan, and to refuse any particular service so long as such refusal is documented in the record of the individual;
(t) Participate in social, religious, and community activities that do not interfere with the rights of other individuals in the agency;
(u) Reside and receive services in the agency with reasonable accommodation of individual needs and preferences, except when the health or safety of the individual or other individuals would be endangered; and
(v) Organize and participate in participant groups.
(13) The individual and their representative have the right to:
(a) Access all records pertaining to the individual including clinical records according to requirements in WAC 246-341-0650; and
(b) Be notified, along with interested family members, when there is:
(i) An accident involving the individual which requires or has the potential for requiring medical intervention;
(ii) A significant change in the individual's physical, mental, or psychosocial status; and
(iii) A change in room or roommate assignment.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160, 71.24.037 and chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW. WSR 21-12-042, § 246-341-1137, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: 2019 c 324, RCW 71.24.037, 71.24.648, and 71.24.649. WSR 20-07-091, § 246-341-1137, filed 3/17/20, effective 5/1/20.]



PDF246-341-1138

Mental health inpatient servicesChild long-term inpatient program (CLIP).

In addition to meeting the evaluation and treatment service requirements of WAC 246-341-1134, child long-term inpatient treatment facilities must develop a written plan for assuring that services provided are appropriate to the developmental needs of children, including all of the following:
(1) If there is not a child psychiatrist on the staff, there must be a child psychiatrist available for consultation.
(2) There must be a psychologist with documented evidence of skill and experience in working with children available either on the clinical staff or by consultation, responsible for planning and reviewing psychological services and for developing a written set of guidelines for psychological services.
(3) There must be a registered nurse, with training and experience in working with psychiatrically impaired children, on staff as a full-time or part-time employee who must be responsible for all nursing functions.
(4) There must be a social worker with experience in working with children on staff as a full-time or part-time employee who must be responsible for social work functions and the integration of these functions into the individual treatment plan.
(5) There must be an educational/vocational assessment of each resident with appropriate educational/vocational programs developed and implemented or assured on the basis of that assessment.
(6) There must be an occupational therapist licensed under chapter 18.59 RCW available who has experience in working with psychiatrically impaired children responsible for occupational therapy functions and the integration of these functions into treatment.
(7) There must be a registered recreational therapist under chapter 18.230 RCW available who has had experience in working with psychiatrically impaired children responsible for the recreational therapy functions and the integration of these functions into treatment.
(8) Disciplinary policies and practices must be stated in writing and all of the following must be true:
(a) Discipline must be fair, reasonable, consistent and related to the behavior of the resident. Discipline, when needed, must be consistent with the individual treatment plan.
(b) Abusive, cruel, hazardous, frightening or humiliating disciplinary practices must not be used. Seclusion and restraints must not be used as punitive measures. Corporal punishment must not be used.
(c) Disciplinary measures must be documented in the clinical record.
(9) Residents must be protected from assault, abuse and neglect. Suspected or alleged incidents of nonaccidental injury, sexual abuse, assault, cruelty or neglect to a child must be reported to a law enforcement agency or to the department of children, youth, and families and comply with chapter 26.44 RCW.
(10) Orientation material must be made available to any facility personnel, clinical staff or consultants informing practitioners of their reporting responsibilities and requirements. Appropriate local police and department phone numbers must be available to personnel and staff.
(11) When suspected or alleged abuse is reported, the clinical record must reflect the fact that an oral or written report has been made to the child protective services of the department of children, youth, and families or to a law enforcement agency within the timelines identified in chapter 26.44 RCW. This note must include the date and time that the report was made, the agency to which it was made and the signature of the person making the report. Contents of the report need not be included in the medical record.
(12) Agencies that provide child long-term inpatient treatment services are exempt from the requirement in WAC 246-341-1060 to admit individuals needing treatment seven days a week, twenty-four hours a day.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160, 71.24.037 and chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW. WSR 21-12-042, § 246-341-1138, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-1138, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.]



PDF246-341-1140

Mental health inpatient servicesCrisis stabilization unit and triage.

An agency certified to provide crisis stabilization unit or triage services must meet all of the following criteria:
(1) A triage facility must be licensed as a residential treatment facility under chapter 71.12 RCW.
(2) If a crisis stabilization unit or triage facility is part of a jail, the unit must be located in an area of the building that is physically separate from the general population. "Physically separate" means:
(a) Out of sight and sound of the general population at all times;
(b) Located in an area with no foot traffic between other areas of the building, except in the case of emergency evacuation; and
(c) Has a secured entrance and exit between the unit and the rest of the facility.
(3) Ensure that a mental health professional is on-site at least eight hours per day, seven days a week, and accessible twenty-four hours per day, seven days per week.
(4) Ensure a mental health professional assesses an individual within three hours of the individual's arrival at the facility.
(5) For persons admitted to the crisis stabilization unit or triage facility on a voluntary basis, the clinical record must meet the clinical record requirements in WAC 246-341-0640.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 71.24.037, 71.05.560, 71.34.380, 18.205.160, 71.24.037 and chapters 71.05, 71.24, and 71.34 RCW. WSR 21-12-042, § 246-341-1140, filed 5/25/21, effective 7/1/21. Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-1140, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.]



PDF246-341-1154

Mental health inpatient servicesCompetency evaluation and restoration.

A behavioral health agency may provide competency evaluation and restoration treatment services to individuals under chapter 10.77 RCW when the department certifies the services.
(1) In addition to meeting the agency licensure, certification, administration, personnel, and clinical requirements in WAC 246-341-0100 through 246-341-0650 and the inpatient services requirements in WAC 246-341-1118 through 246-341-1132, an agency providing competency evaluation and restoration services must be licensed by the department as:
(a) A residential treatment facility consistent with chapter 246-337 WAC;
(b) A hospital consistent with chapter 246-320 WAC;
(c) A private psychiatric hospital consistent with chapter 246-322 WAC; or
(d) An inpatient evaluation and treatment facility as provided in WAC 246-341-1134 and consistent with chapter 246-337 WAC.
(2) The administrative policies and procedures must include:
(a) Designation of a psychiatrist as the professional person in charge of clinical services at the agency;
(b) Procedures to assure the protection of individual participant rights in WAC 246-341-1156; and
(c) Procedures to assure that seclusion and restraint are used only to the extent necessary to ensure the safety of the individual see WAC 246-341-1158.
(3) The clinical record must include all of the following:
(a) A copy of the court order and charging documents. If the order is for competency restoration treatment and the competency evaluation was provided by a qualified expert or professional person who was not designated by the secretary, a copy of all previous court orders related to competency or criminal insanity provided by the state and a copy of any evaluation reports must be included.
(b) A copy of the discovery materials, including, at a minimum, a statement of the individual's criminal history.
(c) A copy of the individual's medical clearance information.
(d) All diagnostic and therapeutic services prescribed by the attending clinical staff members.
(e) Specific targets and strategies for restoring competency to include periodic assessments of gains on these targets.
(f) Participation of a multidisciplinary team that includes at a minimum:
(i) A physician, advanced registered nurse practitioner (ARNP), or physician assistant certified (PA-C);
(ii) A nurse, if the person in (f)(i) of this subsection is not an ARNP; and
(iii) A mental health professional.
(g) Participation of other multidisciplinary team members, which may include a psychologist and chemical dependency professional.
(h) All assessments and justification for the use of seclusion or restraint.
(4) The initial assessment must include:
(a) The individual's:
(i) Identifying information;
(ii) Specific barriers to competence;
(iii) Medical provider's name or medical providers' names;
(iv) Medical concerns;
(v) Medications currently taken;
(vi) Brief mental health history; and
(vii) Brief substance use history, including tobacco use.
(b) The identification of any risk of harm to self and others, including suicide and homicide; and
(c) Treatment recommendations or recommendations for additional program-specific assessment.
(5) To determine the nature of the disorder and the treatment necessary, the agency must ensure that the individual receives the following assessments and document in the client's record the date provided:
(a) A health assessment of the individual's physical condition to determine if the individual needs to be transferred to an appropriate hospital for treatment;
(b) An examination and medical evaluation within twenty-four hours by a physician, advanced registered nurse practitioner, or physician assistant;
(c) A psychosocial evaluation by a mental health professional; and
(d) A competency to stand trial evaluation conducted by a licensed psychologist, or a copy of a competency to stand trial evaluation using the most recent competency evaluation, if an evaluation has already been conducted.
(6) If a state hospital transfers an individual to an agency for competency restoration treatment, the agency must review the individual's completed admission assessment from the state hospital to assure it meets the requirements of subsection (3) of this section for initial assessments. The agency must update the assessment as needed. If the state hospital has not completed or has only partially completed an assessment for the individual, the agency must complete the assessment according to the requirements in subsections (2) and (3) of this section.
(7) The agency must ensure the individual service plan is completed within seven days of admission and is updated every ninety days.
[Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-1154, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.]



PDF246-341-1156

Mental health inpatient servicesCompetency evaluation and restorationRights.

(1) An agency providing competency evaluation and restoration treatment services must develop a statement of individual participant rights to ensure an individual's rights are protected. The statement must incorporate at a minimum all of the following. You have the right to:
(a) Receive services without regard to race, creed, national origin, religion, gender, sexual orientation, age or disability;
(b) Practice the religion of choice as long as the practice does not infringe on the rights and treatment of others or the treatment services and, as an individual participant, the right to refuse participation in any religious practice;
(c) Reasonable accommodation in case of sensory or physical disability, limited ability to communicate, limited English proficiency, or cultural differences;
(d) Respect, dignity and privacy, except that agency staff members may conduct reasonable searches to detect and prevent possession or use of contraband on the premises;
(e) Be free of sexual harassment;
(f) Be free of exploitation, including physical and financial exploitation;
(g) Have all clinical and personal information treated in accord with state and federal confidentiality rules and laws;
(h) Review your clinical record in the presence of the administrator or the administrator's designee and the opportunity to request amendments or corrections;
(i) Upon request, receive a copy of the agency's internal procedures for addressing reported concerns that may amount to a complaint or grievance; and
(j) Submit a report to the department when you believe the agency has violated a Washington Administrative Code (WAC) requirement that regulates facilities.
(2) Each agency must ensure the applicable individual participant rights described in subsection (1) of this section are:
(a) Provided in writing to each individual on or before admission;
(b) Posted in public areas;
(c) Available in alternative formats for an individual who is visually impaired;
(d) Translated to a primary or preferred language identified by an individual who does not speak English as the primary language, and who has a limited ability to read, speak, write, or understand English; and
(e) Available to any individual upon request.
(3) Each agency must ensure all research concerning an individual whose cost of care is publicly funded is done in accordance with chapter 388-04 WAC, the protection of human research subjects, and other applicable state and federal rules and laws.
(4) In addition to the requirements in this section, each agency enrolled as either a medicare or medicaid provider, or both, must ensure an individual seeking or participating in competency evaluation or restoration treatment services, or the person legally responsible for the individual is informed of the medicaid rights at time of admission in a manner that is understandable to the individual or legally responsible person.
[Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-1156, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.]



PDF246-341-1158

Mental health inpatient servicesCompetency evaluation and restorationSeclusion and restraint.

(1) An individual receiving either competency evaluation or restoration treatment services, or both has the right to be free from seclusion and restraint, including chemical restraint except as otherwise provided in this section or otherwise provided by law. The agency must do all of the following:
(a) Develop, implement, and maintain policies and procedures to ensure that seclusion and restraint procedures are used only to the extent necessary to ensure the safety of an individual and in accordance with WAC 246-322-180 or 246-337-110, whichever is applicable.
(b) Ensure that the use of seclusion or restraint occurs only when there is imminent danger to self or others and less restrictive measures have been determined to be ineffective to protect the individual or other from harm and the reasons for the determination are clearly documented in the individual's clinical record.
(c) Ensure staff members notify and receive authorization by a physician, physician assistant (PA) or advanced registered nurse practitioner (ARNP) within one hour of initiating an individual's seclusion or restraint.
(d) Ensure the individual is informed of the reasons for use of seclusion or restraint and the specific behaviors which must be exhibited in order to gain release from a seclusion or restraint procedure.
(e) Ensure that an appropriate clinical staff member observes the individual at least every fifteen minutes and the observation is recorded in the individual's clinical record.
(f) If the use of seclusion or restraint exceeds twenty-four hours, ensure that a physician has assessed the individual and has written a new order if the intervention will be continued. This procedure must be repeated for each twenty-four hour period that seclusion or restraint is used.
(2) The agency must ensure all assessments and justification for the use of either seclusion or restraint, or both, are documented in the individual's clinical record.
[Statutory Authority: 2018 c 201 and 2018 c 291. WSR 19-09-062, § 246-341-1158, filed 4/16/19, effective 5/17/19.]