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WAC 296-17A-3708

Classification 3708.

3708-14 Hide or leather dealers
Applies to establishments engaged in the sale of dressed animal hides, reptile skins and tanned leather. Dealers in this classification receive raw hides from others, sort and grade them, "salt" them (by soaking in a salt solution) to help their preservation, and ship them to tanneries for processing. After the tanneries have processed them, the dressed and finished hides, skins and leather are returned to the hide dealers where they are again graded, measured, trimmed by hand as necessary, then stored until they are shipped to their customers. Customers are primarily manufacturers of garments or other items.
This classification excludes establishments who process raw hides, skins, and fur into tanned leather, or dressed fur, which are to be reported separately in classification 4301.
3708-15 Linoleum, oil cloth or imitation leather: Manufacturing; Coating, impregnating, laminating or waterproofing textiles, N.O.C.
Applies to establishments engaged in the coating, impregnating, laminating, or waterproofing of crude fabric whose operations are not covered by another classification (N.O.C.). Textiles or fabrics may be treated with coatings or finishes such as, but not limited to, oils, varnishes, lacquers, or plastic and rubber finishes. Woven or felt cloth (loose, in rolls or mounted on forms) can be coated with spreading devices, rollers, or by dipping in solvents, drained to allow solvents to evaporate, then cured in drying ovens. Impregnating involves placing fabrics in vacuum tanks with solutions of rubber or lacquer and solvents and subjecting them to various pressures. Solutions are drained, contents removed, dried, baked in curing ovens and rough spots removed by grinding. Laminating is a process of cementing fabric and coating materials together and running them through heated pressure rollers, then curing them in drying ovens. Fabric embossing, which is raising designs in a surface, is included in this classification. These processes are also used in the manufacture of linoleum, oil cloth, imitation leather, and similar waterproofed or laminated fabrics.
This classification excludes establishments engaged in the bleaching, dyeing, or finishing textiles which are to be reported separately in classification 3708-16 and coating or other finishing operations performed by employees of manufacturers of textiles or textile goods which are included in the manufacturing classification as applicable.
3708-16 Bleaching, dyeing or finishing textiles: N.O.C.
Applies to establishments engaged in the bleaching, dyeing, or mercerizing of crude fabric whose operations are not covered by another classification (N.O.C.). The fabric is first treated with bleaches, dyes, and other solutions, then singed and calendered prior to shipping to other manufacturers to be made into textile goods. Mercerizing is the treatment of fabric with sodium hydroxide to shrink the fiber and increase its color absorption and luster. Singeing is the burning of the fiber ends to seal them; calendering is pressing the cloth through heavy rollers to smooth and gloss it. The above operations require the use of large manufacturing machinery such as, but not limited to, calenders and large vats.
This classification excludes establishments engaged in coating, impregnating, laminating or waterproofing textiles which are to be reported separately in classification 3708-15; establishments engaged in the washing and drying, or dying of individual garments for others which are to be reported separately in classification 2201; and coating or other finishing operations performed by employees of manufacturers of textiles or textile goods which are included in the manufacturing classification as applicable.
3708-18 Broom or brush: Manufacturing or assembly, N.O.C.
Applies to establishments engaged in the manufacture or assembly of all types of household and industrial brooms, brushes, and mops not covered by another classification (N.O.C.), including, but not limited to, paint brushes and rollers, whisk brooms, scrub mops, dust mops, brushes for vacuum cleaners, street sweeping or other rotary machines. Animal hair, synthetic fibers, handles and backings made of wood, plastic or metal, screws, rivets or other hardware, metal springs and wire, yarn, and dust-attracting additives are purchased from outside sources. Tools and equipment include, but are not limited to, manually operated or computerized brush making machinery. Brush making machinery drills holes in the brush base, fills holes with hair or other fibers, and staples them in place. Other types of brush making machines make metal-back strip brushes which are mounted in straight or spiraled rows around cores (tubing or shafts), and used in rotary machines. These machines loop bristles around an anchor wire, then crimp a metal channel around the anchor wire, forming the base. The bristles are trimmed to precise lengths on trimming machines.
This classification excludes establishments engaged in the manufacture of metal, wood or plastic handles or backings which are to be reported separately in the classification applicable to the manufacturing process, and establishments that make only mop heads by sewing yarn or other strands to a cloth base which are to be reported separately in classification 3802.
3708-19 Cordage, rope, or twine: Manufacturing
Applies to establishments engaged in the manufacture of cord or cordage, rope, twine, or string from both natural and synthetic fibers such as cotton, manila, sisal, flax, jute, hemp, and rayon. Finished products, which range widely, include, but are not limited to, fish lines, shade or awning cords, mountain climbing ropes or riggings on boats. This classification includes the extrusion of polyethylene or similar pellets to form fibers when done by manufacturers for use in their own products only. This classification also includes establishments that pick, card, and comb fibers prior to twisting the resulting strands into twine or lightweight cord which they may further twist or braid together to produce heavier cordage or rope. "Picking" removes debris from the raw fibers; "carding" untangles and straightens the fibers; "combing" separates long fibers from shorter ones and forms them into thick strands (which are referred to as "slivers"). Other manufacturers in this classification start with spools of cording, then twist or braid a number of strands into heavier cordage or rope. Manufacturers may dye their products, coat them with latex to prevent deterioration, or steam and dry them. The above operations are included in the classification when performed by employees of employers engaged in manufacturing rope or cordage. Machinery includes bale breaking, picking, carding, spinning, twisting, braiding, winding machines, dipping vats, and dryer ovens.
This classification excludes establishments engaged in the manufacture of net, thread, webbing, or yarn which are to be reported separately in classification 3708-26 and establishments engaged in the manufacture of plush, velvet, felt, or other fabric produced by spinning or weaving which are to be reported separately in classification 3708-27.
3708-22 Pelting
Applies to establishments engaged in animal hide pelting operations. A pelt is an untanned animal hide or skin with the hair or fur still on it. For classification purposes, pelting is defined as the initial cleaning and drying of animal skins or hides, but does not involve the removal of hair or fur, or tanning operations. Frozen pelts are thawed by flushing them in water. Fat and tissues are removed from the skin on fleshing machines. Fleshing machines resemble a band saw with a small blade over which the skin is moved to remove fat and tissue. Then skins are placed in tumblers or drums with cornmeal or sawdust to clean the excess moisture, dirt, and oils from them. They are usually transferred to another drum or shaker to remove the cornmeal or sawdust. The cleaned pelts are stretched on drying boards or metal frames, stapled to the frames with hand staplers, and placed in drying rooms until dry. Pelts are sold to tanneries or furriers where they are further processed into tanned hides or dressed furs.
This classification excludes establishments engaged in the tanning of leather and the dressing of fur which are to be reported separately in classification 4301; establishments engaged as taxidermists which are to be reported separately in classification 3708-23; and establishments engaged in raising fur bearing animals which are to be reported separately in classification 4804.
Special note: Pelting of fur bearing animals, when performed by the animal raiser, is considered incidental to the raising and is included within the scope of classification 4804. Raisers of fur bearing animals are entitled to classification 3708-22 only if their hide pelting operation involves the pelting of animals which have been raised by others.
3708-23 Taxidermists
Applies to establishments engaged in taxidermy which is the preparation, stuffing, and mounting of skins of dead animals for exhibition in a lifelike state. This classification includes all operations, including tanning of hides and making animal forms, when performed by employees of the taxidermist. Hunters and fishermen are the primary customers of taxidermists; pet owners may have a pet preserved, all of whom provide the skins or animals. Other customers include museums who use animal likenesses for decorating or exhibit. For these customers, the taxidermist usually purchases tanned hides from other sources. Small animals, such as birds, cats, or fish are usually mounted whole. Large animals may be mounted whole, although generally only the head and neck are mounted. Whole animals are posed and sometimes placed in natural-looking settings. The taxidermist may receive the skin, or the whole animal, in which case the skin is carefully removed in one piece. To remove fat and tissue, the fleshy side of the hide is pulled back and forth across the spinning blade of a fleshing machine. Fleshing machines resemble a band saw with a blade about a foot in diameter which is mounted on a worktable. Hides usually require "finer fleshing" which is done by scraping with a hand knife. Holes or tears in the skin are hand sewn. The taxidermist may finish preparing the skins, or they may send them to a tannery. Other preparations involve tumbling the skins in drums (which resemble clothes dryers) with sawdust or cornmeal to remove excess moisture, dirt, oils, then washing them in solutions of sodas, borax or alum to further clean, soften, and preserve them. Antlers are soaked in brine to remove blood and other waste. Prepared skins of smaller animals are usually stuffed; skins of larger animals are usually stretched over an animal form, sewn together, then glued onto the form. Taxidermists may make their own animal forms from fiberglass or other plastic materials, or they may purchase them elsewhere. Antlers, artificial eyeballs, teeth, tongues, toe nails, and hooves are attached. Finishing work requires touches of paint to eyelashes or mouths (applied with artist's brushes), sprays, or whatever make-up or sculpturing techniques are needed to make the animal look lifelike. Additional materials and equipment includes plaster, cotton or other stuffings, styrofoam, cleaning agents or waxes, hand tools for cutting, scraping, and sculpturing, rasps, sewing needles, hammers, saws, freezers, dryers and tumblers, and sewing machines.
This classification excludes establishments engaged in hide pelting which are to be reported separately in classification 3708-22 and establishments engaged in tanning operations and fur dressing which are to be reported separately in classification 4301.
3708-26 Net, thread, webbing, yarn: Manufacturing
Applies to establishments engaged in the manufacture of webbing, thread, or yarn by spinning, weaving or knitting processes from natural or synthetic fibers such as, but not limited to, cotton, rayon, silk, wool. This classification also includes the manufacture of nets which are woven from cording or twine. Initial operations include the removal of debris from fibers by picking; and untangling, straightening, and stretching of fibers by carding. A combing operation separates long fibers from shorter ones and forms them into thick strands (referred to as slivers). Slivers are placed on creels and fed into spinning machines to be further stretched, spun and twisted onto bobbins (also called packages). The thread or yarn go through further winding, rewinding, doubling, or reeling, depending on the ply being produced. At some point prior to the final winding onto a cone, the threads are rinsed in vats of hot water for several hours to set the ply; dyes may be added to the rinse. Threads are then spun dry and placed in dehydrators until all moisture is removed. Yarn/thread is packaged and sold to fabric weavers. Elastic or nonelastic webbing is woven from yarns or threads on narrow-shuttle looms or knitting machines. The finished lengths are coated, laminated, or dyed prior to winding onto skeins or spools for sale to others. Nets manufactured in this classification range from batting nets or hoop nets for sports, to nets used for commercial purposes. Styles are also widely varied; mesh nets woven on net looms, other types knitted on net-knitting machines; some are hand knotted. Manufacturers may sell "net systems" which include traps, hooks, hinges, lines and other fishing paraphernalia, to the marine industry. Those companies usually sell several styles of nets, some of which are made from ready-made netting they purchase elsewhere and sew bindings and hardware onto them. Hand-knotted netting is often used to catch salmon or herring. Lengths of rope are unwound with winches and winders, and stretched across a waist-high loom that usually extends the length of the factory and includes overhead bars from which rope hangs. Workers stand at the loom and knot the lengths of rope to form nets. Hand knotting is considered an art and takes some time and skill to learn. There are different ways of finishing the nets. Some are pulled and stretched with winches through a heating-drying system (these can be up to 100 feet or so in length). The top of the unit is lowered over the stretched net and steam heat is applied. The stretching tightens the knots, which strengthens them; drying shrinks and cures the net, also adding strength. Another method is to soak nets in vats of hot water to which dyes may be added. Nets may also be dipped in latex coatings and dried in dryer-ovens.
This classification excludes establishments engaged in the manufacture of cordage, rope, or twine which are to be reported separately in classification 3708-19.
3708-27 Spinning or weaving, N.O.C. Plush, velvet, felt: Manufacturing
Applies to establishments engaged in spinning or weaving operations to manufacture woven or nonwoven fabric and which are not covered by another classification (N.O.C.). Raw materials include natural or synthetic filaments (also called thread) such as, but not limited to, cotton, wool, rayon, acetate, or spun fiberglass. Some manufacturers spin their own yarn prior to weaving it into cloth; others purchase the yarn from outside sources. To make woven cloth, creels hold spools (or beams) of yarn; the yarn feeds into the weaving machinery and is woven into cloth. The resultant cloth may be washed, dried, bleached, dyed or otherwise finished by the same manufacturer, or sent elsewhere for finishing. The dyeing, bleaching, or coating of fabric is included within the scope of this classification when performed by employees of an employer engaged in the manufacture of fabric. Nonwoven fabric (also called spunbonded) is lightweight and can be either absorbent or repellent. Uses for this type fabric include, but are not limited to, inner-lining of diapers, surgical/medical masks, handiwipes, mattress pads, pillow coverings. Process for making spunbonded fabric starts with the extrusion of polyethylene pellets into taffy-like substance which is eventually spun into continuous threads with the use of suction, electricity, cold air, and blowing. Once the substance is formed into threads, the threads move through the machinery at high speeds where air guns or nozzles suction several threads into one "visual strand." These transparent strands move along and are blown onto a fast-moving wire conveyor of a sheet-making machine where they are criss-crossed to form a nonwoven mass; the mass passes through the machine's large rollers as heat is applied to it. The heat and the pressure of the rollers bonds the webbed mass into the nonwoven fabric. The fabric passes through more rollers and winders, is wound onto paper cores, cut, and packaged for shipment. This classification includes the manufacture of plush, velvet or felt. Plush and velvet manufacturing contemplates similar operations and machinery as those for other woven fabrics. With velvet, the pile is almost always silk while the pile for plush may be of silk, wool, or mohair. Backings for both may be one or more of silk, artificial silk, wool, or cotton. After leaving the looms, the material goes through coloring, embossing, printing, brushing, shearing and inspecting processes. Felt is a mat-like material which is made by pressing raw materials, such as raw wool, cotton, nylon, textile scraps, into desired dimensions. The materials are first mixed in required proportions and, after picking and dusting, passed through breakers, carders, then laid in layers to form the felt. The felt is pressed and hardened by a hardening machine and, after fulling, is washed, dyed, then dried. (Fulling increases the weight and bulk by shrinking, beating, or pressing.) Once dry, the felt is pressed and trimmed in shearing machines and folded or rolled for shipping.
3708-29 Mattress or box springs: Manufacturing
Applies to establishments engaged in the manufacture of stuffed mattresses, spring mattresses, or box springs. The manufacture of batting, wadding, waste is included in this classification when performed by employees of employers engaged in manufacturing mattresses. Materials include, but are not limited to, wool or cotton stuffing materials, foam for padding, decorative fabric for mattress covers, upholsterer's tape and sewing notions, glue, wire coils or springs, wire grid racks, and wood frames. Machinery includes, but is not limited to, hand tools, staple guns, glue spray guns, nail guns, band saws, sewing machines, eyelet punches, quilting machines, and tape edgers. Mattresses: Mattress pieces are cut to desired size, edging sewn on, eyelets and cord handles attached to the side pieces. Quilting of the covering fabric is done on large quilting machines. To assemble mattresses, batting and foam padding, or other cushioning material, is laid out over the springs, then glued and stapled onto the springs, then ticking (covering) placed on both sides. Borders are sewn to the top and bottom pieces with a hand-held "tape edger" machine. Box Springs: Springs, grid racks, wood frames are received from outside sources. Wood frames are laid out on work surfaces, wire grids set on them, then the springs are stapled to the grids and frames at both ends, forming the box. Layers of batting and covering materials are secured in place; then lightweight cloth is stapled to the bottom of the boxed spring, and plastic reinforcement corner pieces tacked on.
This classification excludes establishments engaged in the manufacture of wire springs which are to be reported separately in classification 3402 and establishments engaged in the manufacture of batting, wadding, or waste which are to be reported separately in classification 3708-34.
3708-32 Carpet or rug: Manufacturing
Applies to establishments engaged in tufting carpets from textile fiber, or weaving carpets and rugs from textile yarn on weaving machinery. Tufted products are sold as wall-to-wall carpets, area rugs, art squares, bath mats or scatter rugs. Woven products are sold as aircraft or automobile floor coverings, mats or matting. Materials include, but are not limited to, pile yarn, jute backing, liquid latex, binding, and sewing notions. Machinery and equipment includes, but is not limited to, tufting machines, looms, vats, electric infrared dryers, electric cutting knives, and sewing machines. For tufted carpets or rugs, pile yarn is sewn to a prewoven jute backing by a high speed machine using hundreds of needles. Rollers move the carpet over vats of rubberized liquid latex while the liquid is applied to the backing to secure the tufting. The carpet then passes through a dryer to dry the latex. Bindings are sewn on with a sewing machine.
This classification excludes establishments engaged in making hand carved or inlaid carpets or rugs from premanufactured carpeting which are to be reported separately in classification 3802.
3708-34 Batting, wadding or waste: Manufacturing; Wool combing or scouring
Applies to establishments engaged in the manufacture of batting, wadding or waste which is sold to distributors or other manufacturers for use in their products. The terms batting and wadding are interchangeable and refer to cotton or wool fibers wadded together to form a soft layer used for padding or stuffing. Batting/wadding is used to stuff mattresses, automobile tops, bed pillows and comforters, sleeping bags, futons, crating pads, stuffed animals, and similar items, or to upholster furniture. Raw materials such as raw or waste cotton, wool, and synthetic fibers are received from others and treated by processes that include shredding, willowing, picking, dusting, carding, blending, rolling, drying and curing. These processes require the use of considerable manufacturing machinery which includes, but is not limited to, choppers, shredders, blowers, conveyor systems, rollers, ovens, winders, and cutters. The terms willowing, picking, and dusting refer to opening and cleaning unprocessed wool or cotton; carding or combing untangles and separates fibers. Fibers are fed into garnetting machines where they are picked, pressure-blown and blended, then blown out onto a long, flat, surface that rotates as the fibers build up to a specified thickness. Once the desired thickness is reached, the mass moves through the machine's rollers, winders, and conveyors; it may be treated lightly with resins or linseed oil. The conveyors move the continuous rolled mass through enclosed ovens where it is cured and dried. The roll of batting may pass through a quilting machine to be bound together in a web structure of strong thread. Finally, it is wound onto cores, cut and prepared for shipping. Shoddy or waste manufacturing is the processing of rags or textile mill waste until the materials are reduced to fibers. Processes may include, but not be limited to, sorting, classifying, carbonizing (exposing rags to hydrochloric acid fumes), baking, dusting, washing, drying, batching, picking, garnetting, and baling. Wool separating operations may include soaking rags in diluted sulfuric acid or carbonizing to remove cotton and other foreign matter. The rags are then dried and processed to remove dust, washed in alkali to neutralize the remaining acid, then dried. This classification also applies to establishments engaged in wool combing or scouring operations. Wool is processed in dusters which remove dirt. The wool then passes to scouring tanks. Several washers may be combined in a unit, the wool passing from one to the other by automatic conveyors. The last tank of clear water rinses the wool and it is then dried. Sometimes it is picked and carded again prior to being dried, then bagged or baled for sale. This classification also includes the treating and twisting of animal hair for upholsterers' use.
3708-39 Textile goods: Manufacturing N.O.C.
Applies to establishments engaged in the manufacture of a wide variety of textile goods not covered by another classification (N.O.C.), and those which incorporate textiles with other types of raw materials. In addition to those described below, raw materials include, but are not limited to, metal or plastic rods and edging strips, glue, epoxy, cork, adhesive tape, nuts, bolts and other small hardware. In addition to that described below, machinery includes, but is not limited to, die cutters, rotary press cutters, band saws, hot wire cutters, reciprocating blade cutters, slitters, balers, thermoweld presses, laminators, rivetors, punch presses, shredding machinery such as hammer mills, and hand tools such as glue sprayers, staple guns, and rivet guns. Sewing machines are often used in the manufacture of products contemplated in this classification; however, sewing is an auxiliary function performed in addition to other fabrication processes. Products contemplated in this classification include, but are not limited to:
Abrasive cloth made by running the backing material (cloth, paper, or combinations of these) through a making machine which is usually a grouping of three units. The printer unit imprints the backside of the backing material with a trademark or grade number; in the next unit an adhesive bond is applied in varying concentrations and quantities; a grain dispenser applies grains or minerals such as flint, emery, crocus, garnet, aluminum oxide or silicone carbine, either by a mechanical or an electrostatic method.
Absorbent booms or sheets designed to lift oil from water, made by shredding paper with an absorbent finish, then blowing it into a sock of netting or a sheet sewn from nonwoven fabric.
Bug screens for automobiles made by cutting wire screen mesh to size with either scissors or a small shearer, sewing vinyl bindings around them.
Conveyor belts made by joining the ends of premanufactured belting made of natural or synthetic rubber to form a continuous belt. Ends may be joined by a mechanical splice or a vulcanized splice. A mechanical splice joins the ends with lacings (metal strips into which wire rods are threaded); a vulcanized splice joins the ends by applying heat under pressure. This type of bonding is also called thermo-welding.
Fishing rod wrappings added to blank poles made by others. Cork handles are glued onto the poles individually in a hand operation. Poles are positioned on a lathe-like devise powered by small motor. Next, guides are placed onto the pole and secured by winding thread around the pole as the lathe slowly turns it. Epoxy is brushed on by hand, or the pole is dipped in epoxy, then placed on a revolving wheel or hung to air dry. If the company that makes the poles also applies the wrappings (finishings), the entire operation is to be reported separately in the classification applicable to the manufacture of the poles.
Hard side luggage or carrying cases for items such as, but not limited to, video cameras, computers, telescopes, made by cutting plywood or premanufactured plastic sheets to pattern, lining the inside and outside of the pattern pieces with materials such as embossed paper or imitation leather, forming the case by riveting metal or plastic edging and corner pieces onto the pattern pieces, and attaching hardware such as handles, hinges, and locks. Polyester foam padding is glued to the inside of the specialized carrying cases to protect the contents.
Hot tub covers made by cutting styrofoam to pattern, joining the two pieces with metal hinges and enclosing the unit in a vinyl covering.
Insulating products made by cutting materials such as premanufactured fiberglass cloth to specified shapes, then stapling together, or by laminating vinyl or other covering fabrics to premanufactured fiberglass cloth.
Office divider panels made by cutting premanufactured materials similar to polyfoam, laminating fabric onto foam, and attaching light weight metal or wood edging pieces.
Rigging for boats such as rope ladders made from heavy-duty rope, slings made by sewing bindings onto premanufactured netting.
This classification also includes the cutting and laminating of styrofoam, polyethylene foam and other flexible "foam rubber" materials to make products such as, but not limited to, mattress pads, cushions, contour pillows, automobile seats, packaging materials, padding and pads for sports equipment. Other products could be contemplated in this classification as long as the materials, machinery and processes used in the manufacture of those products are similar to those of employers subject to this classification.
This classification excludes establishments engaged in the manufacture of miscellaneous textile soft goods which are to be reported separately in classification 3802 and establishments engaged in the molding and mixing of rubber, plastic or graphite goods, which are to be reported separately in the classification applicable to the work being performed.
3708-40 Bag or sack-industrial size, N.O.C.: Manufacturing
Applies to establishments engaged in the manufacture of industrial size bags or sacks which are not covered by another classification (N.O.C.). These types of bags are used for packaging items in bulk, such as, but not limited to, flour, sugar, salt, meat products, fruits and vegetables, fertilizer, building materials, or coal. Raw materials include ink, strong thread, rope drawstrings, and fabric such as, but not limited to, cotton, nylon, woven polypropylene, burlap, or gunny which is generally received in bales. Baled fabric is opened on baler machinery, sewn into continuous lengths, then wound onto cores on a roll-up machine. The fabric is fed through a winder which pulls it straight, then may be run through print presses where logos, brand names, or designs are applied. The lengths are stacked on long cutting tables and cut with hand or power cutters to desired bag size. The sides and bottoms are sewn together inside out, then hem the open end. The bags are turned right side out on turning machines and drawstrings may be inserted in the hemmed edge. Finished bags are bundled into bales with strapping machines and prepared for shipping.
This classification excludes establishments engaged in the manufacture of small bags, packs, picnic bags or others generally carried on the person, which are to be reported separately in classification 3802; establishments engaged in the manufacture of plastic bags which are to be reported separately in classification 3510; and establishments engaged in the manufacture of paper bags which are to be reported separately in classification 6908.
[WSR 07-01-014, recodified as § 296-17A-3708, filed 12/8/06, effective 12/8/06. Statutory Authority: RCW 51.16.035. WSR 98-18-042, § 296-17-604, filed 8/28/98, effective 10/1/98; WSR 96-12-039, § 296-17-604, filed 5/31/96, effective 7/1/96. Statutory Authority: RCW 51.04.020(1) and 51.16.035. WSR 93-12-093, § 296-17-604, filed 5/31/93, effective 7/1/93; WSR 91-12-014, § 296-17-604, filed 5/31/91, effective 7/1/91. Statutory Authority: RCW 51.16.035. WSR 87-24-060 (Order 87-26), § 296-17-604, filed 12/1/87, effective 1/1/88; WSR 85-24-032 (Order 85-33), § 296-17-604, filed 11/27/85, effective 1/1/86; WSR 83-24-017 (Order 83-36), § 296-17-604, filed 11/30/83, effective 1/1/84; WSR 82-24-047 (Order 82-38), § 296-17-604, filed 11/29/82, effective 1/1/83; Order 73-22, § 296-17-604, filed 11/9/73, effective 1/1/74.]
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