28A.225.0261  <<  28A.225.027 >>   28A.225.030

Community truancy boardsGrants for trainingGrants for services and treatment.

(1) Subject to funds appropriated for this purpose, the office of the superintendent of public instruction shall allocate to community truancy boards grant funds that may be used to supplement existing funds in order to pay for training for board members or the provision of services and treatment to children and their families.
(2) The superintendent of public instruction must select grant recipients based on the criteria in this section. This is a competitive grant process. A prerequisite to applying for either or both grants is a memoranda of understanding, between a school district and a court, to institute a new or maintain an existing community truancy board that meets the requirements of RCW 28A.225.025.
(3) Successful applicants for an award of grant funds to supplement existing funds to pay for the training of community truancy board members must commit to the provision of training to board members regarding the identification of barriers to school attendance, the use of the Washington assessment of the risks and needs of students (WARNS) or other assessment tools to identify the specific needs of individual children, trauma-informed approaches to discipline, research about adverse childhood experiences, evidence-based treatments and culturally appropriate promising practices, as well as the specific academic and community services and treatments available in the school, court, community, and elsewhere. This training may be provided by educational service districts.
(4) Successful applicants for an award of grant funds to supplement existing funds to pay for services and treatments provided to children and their families must commit to the provision of academic services such as tutoring, credit retrieval and school reengagement supports, community services, and evidence-based treatments that have been found to be effective in supporting at-risk youth and their families, such as functional family therapy, or those that have been shown to be culturally appropriate promising practices.
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