173-400-070  <<  173-400-075 >>   173-400-081

Emission standards for sources emitting hazardous air pollutants.

(1) National emission standards for hazardous air pollutants (NESHAPs). 40 C.F.R. Part 61 and Appendices (in effect on the date in WAC 173-400-025) are adopted. The term "administrator" in 40 C.F.R. Part 61 includes the permitting authority.
(2) The permitting authority may conduct source tests and require access to records, books, files, and other information specific to the control, recovery, or release of those pollutants regulated under 40 C.F.R. Parts 61, 62, 63 and 65, as applicable, in order to determine the status of compliance of sources of these contaminants and to carry out its enforcement responsibilities.
(3) Source testing, monitoring, and analytical methods for sources of hazardous air pollutants must conform with the requirements of 40 C.F.R. Parts 51, 60, 61, 62, 63 and 65, as applicable.
(4) This section does not apply to any source operating under a waiver granted by EPA or an exemption granted by the president of the United States.
(5) Submit reports required by 40 C.F.R. Parts 61 and 63 to the permitting authority, unless otherwise instructed.
(6) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Source Categories.
Adoption of federal rules.
(a) The term "administrator" in 40 C.F.R. Part 63 includes the permitting authority.
(b) Major sources of hazardous air pollutants. 40 C.F.R. Part 63 and Appendices (in effect on the date in WAC 173-400-025) are adopted as they apply to major sources of hazardous air pollutants.
(c)(i) Nonmajor sources of hazardous air pollutants (area source rules). The stationary sources affected by the following subparts of 40 C.F.R. Part 63 are subject to chapter 173-401 WAC (Operating permit regulation). These subparts of 40 C.F.R. Part 63 and Appendices (in effect on the date in WAC 173-400-025) are adopted:
(A) Subpart X, Secondary lead smelting;
(B) Subpart EEE, Hazardous waste incineration;
(C) Subpart LLL, Portland cement;
(D) Subpart IIIII, Mercury cell chlor-alkali plants;
(E) Subpart YYYYY, Stainless and nonstainless steel manufacturing (electric arc furnace);
(F) Subpart EEEEEE, Primary copper smelting;
(G) Subpart FFFFFF, Secondary copper smelting;
(H) Subpart GGGGGG, Primary nonferrous metal;
(I) Subpart MMMMMM, Carbon black production;
(J) Subpart NNNNNN, Chromium compounds;
(K) Subpart SSSSSS, Pressed and blown glass manufacturing;
(L) Subpart VVVVVV, Chemical manufacturing for synthetic minors; and
(M) Subpart EEEEEEE, Gold mine ore processing and production.
(ii) 40 C.F.R. Part 63 and Appendices are adopted (WAC 173-400-025) as they apply to a stationary source located at a source subject to chapter 173-401 WAC (Operating permit regulation).
(7) Consolidated federal air rule (synthetic organic chemical manufacturing industry). 40 C.F.R. Part 65 (in effect on the date in WAC 173-400-025) is adopted.
(8) Emission standards for perchloroethylene dry cleaners.
(a) Applicability.
(i) This section applies to all dry cleaning systems that use perchloroethylene (PCE). Each dry cleaning system must follow the applicable requirements in Table 1:
TABLE 1.
PCE Dry Cleaner Source Categories
Dry cleaning facilities with:
Small area source purchases less than:
Large area source purchases between:
Major source purchases more than:
Only Dry-to-Dry Machines
140 gallons PCE/yr
140-2,100 gallons PCE/yr
2,100 gallons PCE/yr
(ii) Major sources. In addition to the requirements in this section, a dry cleaning system that is considered a major source according to Table 1 must follow the federal requirements for major sources in 40 C.F.R. Part 63, subpart M (in effect on the date in WAC 173-400-025).
(iii) It is illegal to operate a transfer machine and any machine that requires the movement of wet clothes from one machine to another for drying.
(b) Additional requirements for dry cleaning systems located in a residential building. A residential building is a building where people live.
(i) It is illegal to locate a dry cleaning machine using perchloroethylene in a residential building.
(ii) If you installed a dry cleaning machine using perchloroethylene in a building with a residence before December 21, 2005, you must remove the system by December 21, 2020.
(iii) In addition to requirements found elsewhere in this rule, you must operate the dry cleaning system inside a vapor barrier enclosure. A vapor barrier enclosure is a room that encloses the dry cleaning system. The vapor barrier enclosure must be:
(A) Equipped with a ventilation system that exhausts outside the building and is completely separate from the ventilation system for any other area of the building. The exhaust system must be designed and operated to maintain negative pressure and a ventilation rate of at least one air change per five minutes.
(B) Constructed of glass, plexiglass, polyvinyl chloride, PVC sheet 22 mil thick (0.022 in.), sheet metal, metal foil face composite board, or other materials that are impermeable to perchloroethylene vapor.
(C) Constructed so that all joints and seams are sealed except for inlet make-up air and exhaust openings and the entry door.
(iv) The exhaust system for the vapor barrier enclosure must be operated at all times that the dry cleaning system is in operation and during maintenance. The entry door to the enclosure may be open only when a person is entering or exiting the enclosure.
(c) Operations and maintenance record.
(i) Each dry cleaning facility must keep an operations and maintenance record that is available upon request.
(ii) The information in the operations and maintenance record must be kept on-site for five years.
(iii) The operations and maintenance record must contain the following information:
(A) Inspection: The date and result of each inspection of the dry cleaning system. The inspection must note the condition of the system and the time any leaks were observed.
(B) Repair: The date, time, and result of each repair of the dry cleaning system.
(C) Refrigerated condenser information. If you have a refrigerated condenser, enter this information:
(I) The air temperature at the inlet of the refrigerated condenser;
(II) The air temperature at the outlet of the refrigerated condenser;
(III) The difference between the inlet and outlet temperature readings; and
(IV) The date the temperature was taken.
(D) Carbon adsorber information. If you have a carbon adsorber, enter this information:
(I) The concentration of PCE in the exhaust of the carbon adsorber; and
(II) The date the concentration was measured.
(E) A record of the volume of PCE purchased each month must be entered by the first of the following month;
(F) A record of the total amount of PCE purchased over the previous twelve months must be entered by the first of each month;
(G) All receipts of PCE purchases; and
(H) A record of any pollution prevention activities that have been accomplished.
(d) General operations and maintenance requirements.
(i) Drain cartridge filters in their housing or other sealed container for at least twenty-four hours before discarding the cartridges.
(ii) Close the door of each dry cleaning machine except when transferring articles to or from the machine.
(iii) Store all PCE, and wastes containing PCE, in a closed container with no perceptible leaks.
(iv) Operate and maintain the dry cleaning system according to the manufacturer's specifications and recommendations.
(v) Keep a copy on-site of the design specifications and operating manuals for all dry cleaning equipment.
(vi) Keep a copy on-site of the design specifications and operating manuals for all emissions control devices.
(vii) Route the PCE gas-vapor stream from the dry cleaning system through the applicable equipment in Table 2:
TABLE 2.
Minimum PCE Vapor Vent Control Requirements
Small area source
Large area source
Major source
Dry cleaner located in a building where people live
Refrigerated condenser for all machines installed after September 21, 1993.
Refrigerated condenser for all machines.
Refrigerated condenser with a carbon adsorber for all machines installed after September 21, 1993.
Refrigerated condenser with a carbon adsorber for all machines and a vapor barrier enclosure.
(e) Inspection.
(i) The owner or operator must inspect the dry cleaning system at a minimum following the requirements in Table 3 and Table 4:
TABLE 3.
Minimum Inspection Frequency
Small area source
Large area source
Major source
Dry cleaner located in a building where people live
Once every 2 weeks.
Once every week.
Once every week.
Once every week.
TABLE 4.
Minimum Inspection Frequency Using Portable Leak Detector
Small area source
Large area source
Major source
Dry cleaner located in a building where people may live
Once every month.
Once every month.
Once every month.
Once every week.
(ii) You must check for leaks using a portable leak detector.
(A) The leak detector must be able to detect concentrations of perchloroethylene of 25 parts per million by volume.
(B) The leak detector must emit an audible or visual signal at 25 parts per million by volume.
(C) You must place the probe inlet at the surface of each component where leakage could occur and move it slowly along the joints.
(iii) You must examine these components for condition and perceptible leaks:
(A) Hose and pipe connections, fittings, couplings, and valves;
(B) Door gaskets and seatings;
(C) Filter gaskets and seatings;
(D) Pumps;
(E) Solvent tanks and containers;
(F) Water separators;
(G) Muck cookers;
(H) Stills;
(I) Exhaust dampers; and
(J) Cartridge filter housings.
(iv) The dry cleaning system must be inspected while it is operating.
(v) The date and result of each inspection must be entered in the operations and maintenance record at the time of the inspection.
(f) Repair.
(i) Leaks must be repaired within twenty-four hours of detection if repair parts are available.
(ii) If repair parts are unavailable, they must be ordered within two working days of detecting the leak.
(iii) Repair parts must be installed as soon as possible, and no later than five working days after arrival.
(iv) The date and time each leak was discovered must be entered in the operations and maintenance record.
(v) The date, time, and result of each repair must be entered in the operations and maintenance record at the time of the repair.
(g) Requirements for systems with refrigerated condensers. A dry cleaning system using a refrigerated condenser must meet all of the following requirements:
(i) Outlet air temperature.
(A) Each week the air temperature sensor at the outlet of the refrigerated condenser must be checked.
(B) The air temperature at the outlet of the refrigerated condenser must be less than or equal to 45°F (7.2°C) during the cool-down period.
(C) The air temperature must be entered in the operations and maintenance record manual at the time it is checked.
(D) The air temperature sensor must meet these requirements:
(I) An air temperature sensor must be permanently installed on a dry-to-dry machine, dryer or reclaimer at the outlet of the refrigerated condenser. The air temperature sensor must be installed by September 23, 1996, if the dry cleaning system was constructed before December 9, 1991.
(II) The air temperature sensor must be accurate to within 2°F (1.1°C).
(III) The air temperature sensor must be designed to measure at least a temperature range from 32°F (0°C) to 120°F (48.9°C); and
(IV) The air temperature sensor must be labeled "RC outlet."
(ii) Inlet air temperature.
(A) Each week the air temperature sensor at the inlet of the refrigerated condenser installed on a washer must be checked.
(B) The inlet air temperature must be entered in the operations and maintenance record at the time it is checked.
(C) The air temperature sensor must meet these requirements:
(I) An air temperature sensor must be permanently installed on a washer at the inlet of the refrigerated condenser. The air temperature sensor must be installed by September 23, 1996, if the dry cleaning system was constructed before December 9, 1991.
(II) The air temperature sensor must be accurate to within 2°F (1.1°C).
(III) The air temperature sensor must be designed to measure at least a temperature range from 32°F (0°C) to 120°F (48.9°C).
(IV) The air temperature sensor must be labeled "RC inlet."
(iii) For a refrigerated condenser used on the washer unit of a transfer system, the following are additional requirements:
(A) Each week the difference between the air temperature at the inlet and outlet of the refrigerated condenser must be calculated.
(B) The difference between the air temperature at the inlet and outlet of a refrigerated condenser installed on a washer must be greater than or equal to 20°F (11.1°C).
(C) The difference between the inlet and outlet air temperature must be entered in the operations and maintenance record each time it is checked.
(iv) A converted machine with a refrigerated condenser must be operated with a diverter valve that prevents air drawn into the dry cleaning machine from passing through the refrigerated condenser when the door of the machine is open;
(v) The refrigerated condenser must not vent the air-PCE gas-vapor stream while the dry cleaning machine drum is rotating or, if installed on a washer, until the washer door is opened; and
(vi) The refrigerated condenser in a transfer machine may not be coupled with any other equipment.
(h) Requirements for systems with carbon adsorbers. A dry cleaning system using a carbon adsorber must meet all of the following requirements:
(i) Each week the concentration of PCE in the exhaust of the carbon adsorber must be measured at the outlet of the carbon adsorber using a colorimetric detector tube.
(ii) The concentration of PCE must be written in the operations and maintenance record each time the concentration is checked.
(iii) If the dry cleaning system was constructed before December 9, 1991, monitoring must begin by September 23, 1996.
(iv) The colorimetric tube must meet these requirements:
(A) The colorimetric tube must be able to measure a concentration of 100 parts per million of PCE in air.
(B) The colorimetric tube must be accurate to within 25 parts per million.
(C) The concentration of PCE in the exhaust of the carbon adsorber must not exceed 100 ppm while the dry cleaning machine is venting to the carbon adsorber at the end of the last dry cleaning cycle prior to desorption of the carbon adsorber.
(v) If the dry cleaning system does not have a permanently fixed colorimetric tube, a sampling port must be provided within the exhaust outlet of the carbon adsorber. The sampling port must meet all of these requirements:
(A) The sampling port must be easily accessible;
(B) The sampling port must be located 8 stack or duct diameters downstream from a bend, expansion, contraction or outlet; and
(C) The sampling port must be 2 stack or duct diameters upstream from a bend, expansion, contraction, inlet or outlet.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 70.94.152, 70.94.331, 70.94.860. WSR 16-12-099 (Order 16-01), § 173-400-075, filed 5/31/16, effective 7/1/16. Statutory Authority: Chapter 70.94 RCW. WSR 12-24-027 (Order 11-10), § 173-400-075, filed 11/28/12, effective 12/29/12; WSR 11-06-060 (Order 09-01), § 173-400-075, filed 3/1/11, effective 4/1/11. Statutory Authority: RCW 70.94.395 and 70.94.331. WSR 07-11-039 (Order 06-03), § 173-400-075, filed 5/8/07, effective 6/8/07. Statutory Authority: RCW 70.94.152. WSR 05-03-033 (Order 03-07), § 173-400-075, filed 1/10/05, effective 2/10/05. Statutory Authority: RCW 70.94.331. WSR 02-15-068 (Order 02-09), § 173-400-075, filed 7/11/02, effective 8/11/02. Statutory Authority: Chapter 70.94 RCW, RCW 70.94.141, [70.94.]152, [70.94.]331, [70.94.]510 and 43.21A.080. WSR 01-17-062 (Order 99-06), § 173-400-075, filed 8/15/01, effective 9/15/01. Statutory Authority: [RCW 70.94.331, 70.94.510 and chapter 70.94 RCW.] WSR 00-23-130 (Order 98-27), § 173-400-075, filed 11/22/00, effective 12/23/00. Statutory Authority: RCW 70.94.860, 70.94.510 and 70.94.331. WSR 98-15-129 (Order 98-04), § 173-400-075, filed 7/21/98, effective 8/21/98. Statutory Authority: Chapter 70.94 RCW. WSR 96-19-054 (Order 94-35), § 173-400-075, filed 9/13/96, effective 10/14/96; WSR 93-05-044 (Order 92-34), § 173-400-075, filed 2/17/93, effective 3/20/93; WSR 91-05-064 (Order 90-06), § 173-400-075, filed 2/19/91, effective 3/22/91. Statutory Authority: RCW 70.94.331, 70.94.395 and 70.94.510. WSR 85-06-046 (Order 84-48), § 173-400-075, filed 3/6/85. Statutory Authority: Chapter 70.94 RCW. WSR 84-10-019 (Order DE 84-8), § 173-400-075, filed 4/26/84. Statutory Authority: Chapters 43.21A and 70.94 RCW. WSR 83-09-036 (Order DE 83-13), § 173-400-075, filed 4/15/83. Statutory Authority: RCW 70.94.331. WSR 80-11-059 (Order DE 80-14), § 173-400-075, filed 8/20/80. Statutory Authority: RCW 43.21A.080 and 70.94.331. WSR 79-06-012 (Order DE 78-21), § 173-400-075, filed 5/8/79; Order DE 76-38, § 173-400-075, filed 12/21/76. Formerly WAC 18-04-075.]
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