Chapter 43.06 RCW

GOVERNOR

Sections

43.06.010General powers and duties.
43.06.013Requests for nonconviction criminal history fingerprint record checks for agency heads"Agency head" defined.
43.06.015Interstate oil compact commissionGovernor may join.
43.06.020Records to be kept.
43.06.030Appointments to senate for confirmationNotice.
43.06.040Lieutenant governor acts in governor's absence.
43.06.050Powers and duties of acting governor.
43.06.055Governor-electAppropriation to provide office and staff.
43.06.060Expense of publishing proclamations.
43.06.070Removal of appointive officers.
43.06.080Removal of appointive officersStatement of reasons to be filed.
43.06.090Removal of appointive officersFilling of vacancy.
43.06.092Gubernatorial appointeesContinuation of serviceAppointments to fill vacancies.
43.06.094Gubernatorial appointeesRemoval prior to confirmation.
43.06.110Economic opportunity act programsState participationAuthority of governor.
43.06.115Militarily impacted areaDeclaration by governor.
43.06.120Federal funds and programsAcceptance of funds by governor authorizedAdministration and disbursement.
43.06.130Federal funds and programsPayment of travel expenses of committees, councils, or other bodies.
43.06.150Federal funds and programsParticipating agencies to notify director of financial management, joint legislative audit and review committee and legislative councilProgress reports.
43.06.155Health care reform deliberationsPrinciplesPolicies.
43.06.200Definitions.
43.06.210ProclamationsGenerallyState of emergency.
43.06.220State of emergencyPowers of governor pursuant to proclamation.
43.06.230State of emergencyDestroying or damaging property or causing personal injuryPenalty.
43.06.240State of emergencyDisorderly conduct after emergency proclaimedPenalty.
43.06.250State of emergencyRefusing to leave public way or property when orderedPenalty.
43.06.260State of emergencyProsecution of persons sixteen years or over as adults.
43.06.270State of emergencyState militia or state patrolUse in restoring order.
43.06.335Washington quality award councilOrganizationDuties.
43.06.338Washington marine resources advisory council.
43.06.350Foreign nationals or citizens, convicted offendersTransfers and sentences.
43.06.400Listing of reduction in revenues from tax exemptions to be submitted to legislature by department of revenuePeriodic review and submission of recommendations to legislature by governor.
43.06.410State internship programGovernor's duties.
43.06.415State internship program coordinatorRules.
43.06.420Undergraduate internship programExecutive fellows program.
43.06.425InternsEffect of employment experienceRights of reversionFringe benefitsSick and vacation leave.
43.06.435InternsEffect on full time equivalent staff position limitations.
43.06.450Cigarette tax contractsIntentFindingLimitations.
43.06.455Cigarette tax contractsRequirementsUse of revenueEnforcementDefinitions.
43.06.460Cigarette tax contractsEligible tribesTax rate.
43.06.465Cigarette tax agreement with Puyallup Tribe of Indians.
43.06.466Cigarette tax agreementYakama Nation.
43.06.468Raising the minimum legal age of sale in certain compactsConsultations with federally recognized Indian tribesReport to legislature.
43.06.475Timber harvest excise tax agreements.
43.06.480Timber harvest excise tax agreementsQuinault Nation.
43.06.485Senior policy advisor to the governorState lead for economic development relating to the outdoor recreation sector of the state's economy.
43.06.490Marijuana agreementsFederally recognized Indian tribesTribal marijuana taxTax exemption.
43.06.500Commission on diversity, equity, and inclusionCreatedPowersAnnual reportMembership.
43.06.505Vapor product tax contractsRequirements.
43.06.510Vapor product tax contractsIndian tribes.
43.06.515Vapor product tax contractsPuyallup tribe.

NOTES:

Appointing power
accountancy board: RCW 18.04.035.
administrator for the courts: RCW 2.56.010.
board for architects: RCW 18.08.330.
board of registration of professional engineers and land surveyors: RCW 18.43.030.
board of tax appeals: RCW 82.03.020.
center for volunteerism and citizen service: RCW 43.150.040.
clemency and pardons board: RCW 9.94A.880.
college district boards of trustees: RCW 28B.50.100.
court of appeals vacancy: State Constitution Art. 4 § 30; RCW 2.06.080.
criminal justice training commission: RCW 43.101.030.
degree-granting institutions, attorney general participation: Chapter 28B.85 RCW.
department of ecology, director of: RCW 43.21A.050.
department of social and health services, secretary of: RCW 43.20A.040.
directors of state departments and agencies: RCW 43.17.020.
electrical advisory board members: RCW 19.28.311.
energy facility site evaluation council: RCW 80.50.030.
financial management, director: RCW 43.41.060.
fish and wildlife commission: RCW 77.04.030.
higher education facilities authority: RCW 28B.07.030.
industrial insurance appeals board: RCW 51.52.010.
investment board members: RCW 43.33A.020.
judges of court of appeals, vacancy: State Constitution Art. 4 § 30; RCW 2.06.080.
judges of superior court, vacancy: State Constitution Art. 4 § 5; RCW 2.08.120.
vacancy resulting from creation of additional judgeship: RCW 2.08.069.
justices of supreme court, vacancy: State Constitution Art. 4 § 3; RCW 2.04.100.
license examining committee: RCW 43.24.060.
militia officers: State Constitution Art. 10 § 2.
optometry board members: RCW 18.54.030.
Pacific marine fisheries commission, appointment of representatives to: RCW 77.75.040.
pharmacy quality assurance commission: RCW 18.64.001.
physical therapy board committee: RCW 18.74.020.
podiatric medical board: RCW 18.22.013.
pollution control hearings board of the state: RCW 43.21B.020, 43.21B.030.
private vocational schools, attorney general participation: Chapter 28C.10 RCW.
railroad police officers: RCW 81.60.010.
real estate commission: RCW 18.85.021.
recreation and conservation funding board: RCW 79A.25.110.
regents of educational institutions: State Constitution Art. 13 § 1.
state arts commission: RCW 43.46.015.
state board for community and technical colleges: RCW 28B.50.050, 28B.50.070.
state board of health: RCW 43.20.030.
state college boards of trustees: RCW 28B.40.100.
state patrol chief: RCW 43.43.020.
statute law committee members: RCW 1.08.001.
superior court vacancy: State Constitution Art. 4 § 5; RCW 2.08.069, 2.08.120.
supreme court vacancy: State Constitution Art. 4 § 3; RCW 2.04.100.
traffic safety commission: RCW 43.59.030.
transportation commission members: RCW 47.01.051.
uniform law commission: RCW 43.56.010.
United States senator, filling vacancy in office of: RCW 29A.28.030.
University of Washington board of regents: RCW 28B.20.100.
utilities and transportation commission: RCW 80.01.010.
vacancies in
appointive office filled by: State Constitution Art. 3 § 13.
court of appeals, filled by: State Constitution Art. 4 § 30; RCW 2.06.080.
legislature, duties: State Constitution Art. 2 § 15.
superior court, filled by: State Constitution Art. 4 § 5; RCW 2.08.069, 2.08.120.
supreme court, filled by: State Constitution Art. 4 § 3; RCW 2.04.100.
veterinary board of governors: RCW 18.92.021.
visiting judges of superior court: RCW 2.08.140.
Washington personnel resources board: RCW 41.06.110.
Washington State University board of regents: RCW 28B.30.100.
Approval of laws: State Constitution Art. 3 § 12.
Associations of municipal corporations or officers to furnish information to governor: RCW 44.04.170.
Attorney general, advice to governor: RCW 43.10.030.
Board of natural resources member: RCW 43.30.205.
Bonds, notes and other evidences of indebtedness, governor's duties: Chapter 39.42 RCW.
Clemency and pardons board, established as board in office of governor: RCW 9.94A.880.
Collective bargaining negotiations for marine employees: RCW 47.64.170 and 47.64.175.
Commander-in-chief of state militia: State Constitution Art. 3 § 8.
Commissions issued by state, signed by: State Constitution Art. 3 § 15.
Commutation of death sentence, power to commute: RCW 10.01.120.
Continuity of government in event of enemy attack, succession to office of governor: RCW 42.14.020.
Driver license compact, executive head: RCW 46.21.040.
Election certificates issued for state and congressional offices by: RCW 29A.52.370.
Election of: State Constitution Art. 3 § 1.
Execution of laws: State Constitution Art. 3 § 5.
Extradition proceedings
power and duties as to: RCW 10.34.030.
warrant issued by: RCW 10.88.260.
Federal REAL ID Act of 2005, approval of attorney general legal challenge: RCW 46.20.1911.
Fines, power to remit: State Constitution Art. 3 § 11.
Forfeitures, power to remit: State Constitution Art. 3 § 11.
Highway
construction bonds and coupons, governor to sign: Chapter 47.10 RCW.
toll facility property sale, deed executed by: RCW 47.56.255.
Impeachment: State Constitution Art. 5 §§ 1, 2.
Indians, assumption of state jurisdiction, proclamation by governor: RCW 37.12.021.
Information in writing may be required from state officers: State Constitution Art. 3 § 5.
Interstate compact on juveniles, duties: Chapter 13.24 RCW.
Judges' retirement applications, doctors' examination report, approval and filing of: RCW 2.12.020.
Judicial officers
extension of leave of absence of: State Constitution Art. 4 § 8.
superior court, assignment to another county by: State Constitution Art. 4 §§ 5, 7.
Legal holidays
designation of: RCW 1.16.050.
proclamation process, applicability to courts: RCW 2.28.100.
Legislature
extra session, may convene: State Constitution Art. 3 § 7.
messages to: State Constitution Art. 3 § 6.
vacancies, filled by: State Constitution Art. 2 § 15.
Local governmental organizations, actions affecting boundaries, etc., review by boundary review board: Chapter 36.93 RCW.
Marketing agreements or orders, annual audit of financial affairs under, governor to receive reports of: RCW 15.65.490.
Messages to legislature: State Constitution Art. 3 § 6.
Militia and military affairs
commander-in-chief of militia: State Constitution Art. 3 § 8; RCW 38.08.020.
compacts with other states for guarding boundaries: RCW 38.08.100.
eminent domain for military purposes: RCW 8.04.170, 8.04.180.
martial law, proclamation by, when: RCW 38.08.030.
officers, commissioned by: State Constitution Art. 10 § 2.
personal staff: RCW 38.08.070.
rules promulgated by: RCW 38.08.090.
strength, composition, training, etc., prescribed by: RCW 38.04.040.
Motor vehicle administration, annual report of director of licensing to go to: RCW 46.01.290.
OASI, agreement of state for participation of state and political subdivision employees, duties concerning: Chapter 41.48 RCW.
Oath of office: RCW 43.01.020.
Official bonds, approval of: RCW 42.08.100.
Pardons
power to grant: RCW 10.01.120.
report to legislature of: State Constitution Art. 3 §§ 9, 11.
restrictions prescribed by law: State Constitution Art. 3 § 9.
Paroles, governor may revoke: RCW 9.95.160.
Protection for governor, lieutenant governor, and governor elect, duty of chief of state patrol to provide: RCW 43.43.035.
Puget Sound ferry and toll bridge system, governor's powers and duties relating to: Chapter 47.60 RCW.
Registry of governor's acts kept by secretary of state: RCW 43.07.030.
Remission of fines and forfeitures report to legislature with reasons: State Constitution Art. 3 § 11.
Reports to governor
agricultural marketing agreements or orders, audits and financial reports: RCW 15.65.490.
agricultural marketing legislation recommendations: RCW 15.64.010.
agriculture director: RCW 43.23.130.
annual report by state officers, etc., period covered: RCW 43.01.035.
business license center: RCW 19.02.030.
department of personnel: RCW 43.03.028.
engineers and land surveyors board of registration: RCW 18.43.035.
enrollment forecasts: RCW 43.62.050.
financial management, director: RCW 43.88.160.
fish and wildlife director: RCW 77.04.120.
horse racing commission: RCW 67.16.015.
human rights commission: RCW 49.60.100.
indeterminate sentence review board: RCW 9.95.265.
industrial insurance, violations: RCW 51.04.020.
investment activities of state investment board: RCW 43.33A.150.
judges of the supreme court to report defects or omissions in laws to: RCW 2.04.230.
labor and industries director: RCW 49.12.180.
motor vehicle administration, director of licensing: RCW 46.01.290.
state arts commission: RCW 43.46.070.
state board for community and technical colleges: RCW 28B.50.070.
state board of health: RCW 43.20.100.
state officers: State Constitution Art. 3 § 5.
state parks and recreation commission: RCW 79A.05.030.
superintendent of public instruction, biennial report: RCW 28A.300.040.
University of Washington board of regents: RCW 28B.20.130.
veterans' rehabilitation council: RCW 43.61.040.
Reprieves
power to grant: RCW 10.01.120.
report to legislature: State Constitution Art. 3 § 11.
Residence at seat of government: State Constitution Art. 3 § 24.
Resignation by state officers and members of legislature made to: RCW 42.12.020.
Salaries of public officials, governor's duties: RCW 43.03.028 and 43.03.040.
Salary of governor, amount of: State Constitution Art. 28 § 1; RCW 43.03.010.
Sale of unneeded toll facility property, governor to execute deed: RCW 47.56.255.
School apportionment demands estimate certified to: RCW 28A.300.170.
Secretary of transportation, governor to fix salary of: RCW 47.01.031.
Security and protection for governor, lieutenant governor, and governor elect, duty of state patrol to provide: RCW 43.43.035.
State capitol committee member: RCW 43.34.010.
State finance committee member: RCW 43.33.010.
State parks, disposal of land not needed for park purposes, conveyance instruments executed by: RCW 79A.05.175.
State participation within student exchange compact programsOffice to advise governor: RCW 28B.76.650.
Succession to governorship: State Constitution Art. 3 § 10.
Superior court judge, assignment to another county: State Constitution Art. 4 §§ 5, 7.
Supreme executive power vested in: State Constitution Art. 3 § 2.
Term of office: State Constitution Art. 3 § 2; RCW 43.01.010.
Toll bridge bonds, governor to countersign: RCW 47.56.140.
Toll bridges, improvement of existing bridge and construction of new bridge as single project, governor's powers and duties relating to: Chapter 47.58 RCW.
Traffic safety commission and programs, powers, duties and responsibilities of governor: Chapter 43.59 RCW.
Unanticipated receipts, governor as state's agent to receive: RCW 43.79.260.
Unemployment compensation, delinquent payments in lieu of contributions of political subdivisions, governor may withhold funds for: RCW 50.24.125.
Uniform interstate family support act
extradition powers and duties: RCW 26.21A.650.
governor defined for purposes of: RCW 26.21A.650.
United States senate, filling vacancy in: RCW 29A.28.030.
Vacancies
in court of appeals: State Constitution Art. 4 § 30; RCW 2.06.080.
in legislature, duties: State Constitution Art. 2 § 15.
in office filled by: State Constitution Art. 3 § 13.
in superior court: State Constitution Art. 4 § 5.
in supreme court: State Constitution Art. 4 § 3.
Vacancy in office of governor
election to fill: State Constitution Art. 3 § 10.
succession to: State Constitution Art. 3 § 10.
Veto
initiatives and referendums, power does not extend to: State Constitution Art. 2 § 1.
power of: State Constitution Art. 3 § 12.
Voluntary action center, establishment by governor: RCW 43.150.040.
Washington scholars' program, participation in: RCW 28A.600.100 through 28A.600.150.
Water pollution control, powers and duties pertaining to: RCW 90.48.260, 90.48.262.


General powers and duties.

In addition to those prescribed by the Constitution, the governor may exercise the powers and perform the duties prescribed in this and the following sections:
(1) The governor shall supervise the conduct of all executive and ministerial offices;
(2) The governor shall see that all offices are filled, including as provided in RCW 42.12.070, and the duties thereof performed, or in default thereof, apply such remedy as the law allows; and if the remedy is imperfect, acquaint the legislature therewith at its next session;
(3) The governor shall make the appointments and supply the vacancies mentioned in this title;
(4) The governor is the sole official organ of communication between the government of this state and the government of any other state or territory, or of the United States;
(5) Whenever any suit or legal proceeding is pending against this state, or which may affect the title of this state to any property, or which may result in any claim against the state, the governor may direct the attorney general to appear on behalf of the state, and report the same to the governor, or to any grand jury designated by the governor, or to the legislature when next in session;
(6) The governor may require the attorney general or any prosecuting attorney to inquire into the affairs or management of any corporation existing under the laws of this state, or doing business in this state, and report the same to the governor, or to any grand jury designated by the governor, or to the legislature when next in session;
(7) The governor may require the attorney general to aid any prosecuting attorney in the discharge of the prosecutor's duties;
(8) The governor may offer rewards, not exceeding one thousand dollars in each case, payable out of the state treasury, for information leading to the apprehension of any person convicted of a felony who has escaped from a state correctional institution or for information leading to the arrest of any person who has committed or is charged with the commission of a felony;
(9) The governor shall perform such duties respecting fugitives from justice as are prescribed by law;
(10) The governor shall issue and transmit election proclamations as prescribed by law;
(11) The governor may require any officer or board to make, upon demand, special reports to the governor, in writing;
(12) The governor may, after finding that a public disorder, disaster, energy emergency, or riot exists within this state or any part thereof which affects life, health, property, or the public peace, proclaim a state of emergency in the area affected, and the powers granted the governor during a state of emergency shall be effective only within the area described in the proclamation;
(13) The governor may, after finding that there exists within this state an imminent danger of infestation of plant pests as defined in RCW 17.24.007 or plant diseases which seriously endangers the agricultural or horticultural industries of the state of Washington, or which seriously threatens life, health, or economic well-being, order emergency measures to prevent or abate the infestation or disease situation, which measures, after thorough evaluation of all other alternatives, may include the aerial application of pesticides;
(14) The governor, after finding that a prohibited level 1 or level 2 species as defined in chapter 77.135 RCW has been detected and after finding that the detected species seriously endangers or threatens the environment, economy, human health, or well-being of the state of Washington, may order emergency measures to prevent or abate the prohibited species, which measures, after thorough evaluation of all other alternatives, may include the surface or aerial application of pesticides;
(15) On all compacts forwarded to the governor pursuant to RCW 9.46.360(6), the governor is authorized and empowered to execute on behalf of the state compacts with federally recognized Indian tribes in the state of Washington pursuant to the federal Indian Gaming Regulatory Act, 25 U.S.C. Sec. 2701 et seq., for conducting class III gaming, as defined in the Act, on Indian lands.

NOTES:

Findings2014 c 202: See note following RCW 77.135.010.
Severability1992 c 172: "If any provision of this act or its application to any person or circumstance is held invalid, the remainder of the act or the application of the provision to other persons or circumstances is not affected." [ 1992 c 172 § 4.]
SeverabilityEffective date1982 c 153: See notes following RCW 17.24.210.
SeverabilityEffective date1975-'76 2nd ex.s. c 108: See notes following RCW 43.21F.010.
Rewards by county legislative authorities: Chapter 10.85 RCW.



Requests for nonconviction criminal history fingerprint record checks for agency heads"Agency head" defined.

When requested by the governor or the director of the department of enterprise services, nonconviction criminal history fingerprint record checks shall be conducted through the Washington state patrol identification and criminal history section and the federal bureau of investigation on applicants for agency head positions appointed by the governor. Information received pursuant to this section shall be confidential and made available only to the governor or director of financial management or their employees directly involved in the selection, hiring, or background investigation of the subject of the record check. When necessary, applicants may be employed on a conditional basis pending completion of the criminal history record check. "Agency head" as used in this section has the same definition as provided in RCW 34.05.010.

NOTES:

Effective datePurpose2011 1st sp.s. c 43: See notes following RCW 43.19.003.



Interstate oil compact commissionGovernor may join.

The governor is authorized, on behalf of the state of Washington, to join the interstate oil compact commission as an associate member and to become an active member thereof if and when oil and gas are produced in Washington in commercial quantities and to attend meetings and participate in the activities carried on by said commission either in person or by a duly authorized representative.

NOTES:

Interstate compact to conserve oil and gas: 65 Stat. 199 (P. L. 128, ch. 350) Aug. 28, 1951. Associate membership authorized by Art. 9 § 2 of the commission's bylaws.



Records to be kept.

The governor must cause to be kept the following records:
First, a register of all pardons, commutations, executive paroles, final discharges, and restorations of citizenship made by him or her;
Second, an account of all his or her disbursements of state moneys, and of all rewards offered by him or her for the apprehension of criminals and persons charged with crime;
Third, a register of all appointments made by him or her with date of commission, name of appointee and name of predecessor, if any.



Appointments to senate for confirmationNotice.

For a gubernatorial appointment to be effective, the governor must transmit to the secretary of the senate notice of the appointment, along with pertinent information regarding the appointee, within fourteen days after making any appointment subject to senate confirmation.



Lieutenant governor acts in governor's absence.

If the governor absents himself or herself from the state, he or she shall, prior to his or her departure, notify the lieutenant governor of his or her proposed absence, and during such absence the lieutenant governor shall perform all the duties of the governor.

NOTES:

Duties of lieutenant governor: State Constitution Art. 3 § 16.



Powers and duties of acting governor.

Every provision of law in relation to the powers and duties of the governor, and in relation to acts and duties to be performed by others towards him or her, extends to the person performing for the time being the duties of governor.



Governor-electAppropriation to provide office and staff.

The legislature preceding the gubernatorial election shall make an appropriation which may only be expended by a newly elected governor other than the incumbent for the purpose of providing office and staff for the governor-elect preparatory to his or her assumption of duties as governor. The funds for the appropriation shall be made available to him or her not later than thirty days prior to the date when the legislature will convene.



Expense of publishing proclamations.

When the governor is authorized or required by law to issue a proclamation, payment for publishing it shall be made out of the state treasury.
[ 1965 c 8 § 43.06.060. Prior: 1881 p 45 §§ 1-3; Code 1881 § 2367; RRS § 10988.]



Removal of appointive officers.

The governor may remove from office any state officer appointed by him or her not liable to impeachment, for incompetency, misconduct, or malfeasance in office.



Removal of appointive officersStatement of reasons to be filed.

Whenever the governor is satisfied that any officer not liable to impeachment has been guilty of misconduct, or malfeasance in office, or is incompetent, he or she shall file with the secretary of state a statement showing his or her reasons, with his or her order of removal, and the secretary of state shall forthwith send a certified copy of such order of removal and statement of causes by registered mail to the last known post office address of the officer in question.



Removal of appointive officersFilling of vacancy.

At the time of making any removal from office, the governor shall appoint some proper person to fill the office, who shall forthwith demand and receive from the officer removed the papers, records, and property of the state pertaining to the office, and shall perform the duties of the office and receive the compensation thereof until his or her successor is appointed.



Gubernatorial appointeesContinuation of serviceAppointments to fill vacancies.

(1) Any gubernatorial appointee subject to senate confirmation shall continue to serve unless rejected by a vote of the senate. An appointee who is rejected by a vote of the senate shall not be reappointed to the same position for a period of one year from termination of service.
(2) Any person appointed by the governor to fill the unexpired term of an appointment subject to senate confirmation must also be confirmed by the senate.



Gubernatorial appointeesRemoval prior to confirmation.

Gubernatorial appointees subject to senate confirmation, other than those who serve at the governor's pleasure, may not be removed from office without cause by the governor prior to confirmation except upon consent of the senate as provided for by the rules of the senate.



Economic opportunity act programsState participationAuthority of governor.

The governor, or his or her designee, is hereby authorized and empowered to undertake such programs as will, in the judgment of the governor, or his or her designee, enable families and individuals of all ages, in rural and urban areas, in need of the skills, knowledge, motivations, and opportunities to become economically self-sufficient to obtain and secure such skills, knowledge, motivations, and opportunities. Such programs may be engaged in as solely state operations, or in conjunction or cooperation with any appropriate agency of the federal government, any branch or agency of the government of this state, any city or town, county, municipal corporation, metropolitan municipal corporation or other political subdivision of the state, or any private corporation. Where compliance with the provisions of federal law or rules or regulations promulgated thereunder is a necessary condition to the receipt of federal funds by the state, the governor or his or her designee, is hereby authorized to comply with such laws, rules or regulations to the extent necessary for the state to cooperate most fully with the federal government in furtherance of the programs herein authorized.

NOTES:

County participation in Economic Opportunity Act programs: RCW 36.32.410.



Militarily impacted areaDeclaration by governor.

(1) The governor may, by executive order, after consultation with or notification of the executive-legislative committee on economic development created by *chapter . . . (Senate Bill No. 5300), Laws of 1993, declare a community to be a "military impacted area." A "military impacted area" means a community or communities, as identified in the executive order, that experience serious social and economic hardships because of a change in defense spending by the federal government in that community or communities.
(2) If the governor executes an order under subsection (1) of this section, the governor shall establish a response team to coordinate state efforts to assist the military impacted community. The response team may include, but not be limited to, one member from each of the following agencies: (a) The department of commerce; (b) the department of social and health services; (c) the employment security department; (d) the state board for community and technical colleges; (e) the student achievement council; and (f) the department of transportation. The governor may appoint a response team coordinator. The governor shall seek to actively involve the impacted community or communities in planning and implementing a response to the crisis. The governor may seek input or assistance from the community diversification advisory committee, and the governor may establish task forces in the community or communities to assist in the coordination and delivery of services to the local community. The state and community response shall consider economic development, human service, and training needs of the community or communities impacted.

NOTES:

*Reviser's note: Senate Bill No. 5300 was vetoed.
Effective date2012 c 229 §§ 101, 117, 401, 402, 501 through 594, 601 through 609, 701 through 708, 801 through 821, 902, and 904: See note following RCW 28B.77.005.
FindingsIntentPart headings not lawEffective date1996 c 186: See notes following RCW 43.330.904.
FindingIntent1993 c 421: "The legislature finds that military base expansions, closures, and defense procurement contract cancellations may have extreme economic impacts on communities and firms. The legislature began to address this concern in 1990 by establishing the community diversification program in the department of community development. While this program has helped military dependent communities begin the long road to diversification, base expansions or closures or major procurement contract reductions in the near future will find these communities unable to respond adequately, endangering the health, safety, and welfare of the community. The legislature intends to target emergency state assistance to military dependent communities significantly impacted by defense spending. The emergency state assistance and the long-term strategy should be driven by the impacted community and consistent with the state plan for diversification required under RCW 43.63A.450(4)." [ 1993 c 421 § 1.]



Federal funds and programsAcceptance of funds by governor authorizedAdministration and disbursement.

The governor is authorized to accept on behalf of the state of Washington funds provided by any act of congress for the benefit of the state or its political subdivisions. He or she is further authorized to administer and disburse such funds, or to designate an agency to administer and disburse them, until the legislature otherwise directs.



Federal funds and programsPayment of travel expenses of committees, councils, or other bodies.

Members of advisory committees, councils, or other bodies established to meet requirements of acts of congress may be paid travel expenses incurred pursuant to RCW 43.03.050 and 43.03.060 as now existing or hereafter amended from such funds as may be available by legislative appropriation or as may otherwise be available as provided by law.
[1975-'76 2nd ex.s. c 34 § 97; 1973 2nd ex.s. c 17 § 1; 1967 ex.s. c 41 § 2.]

NOTES:

Effective dateSeverability1975-'76 2nd ex.s. c 34: See notes following RCW 2.08.115.



Federal funds and programsParticipating agencies to notify director of financial management, joint legislative audit and review committee and legislative councilProgress reports.

See RCW 43.88.205.



Health care reform deliberationsPrinciplesPolicies.

(1) The following principles shall provide guidance to the state of Washington in its health care reform deliberations:
(a) Guarantee choice. Provide the people of Washington state with a choice of health plans and physicians, including health plans offered through the private insurance market and public programs, for those who meet eligibility standards. People will be allowed to keep their own doctor and their employer-based health plan.
(b) Make health coverage affordable. Reduce waste and fraud, high administrative costs, unnecessary tests and services, and other inefficiencies that drive up costs with no added health benefits.
(c) Protect families' financial health. Reduce the growing premiums and other costs that the people of Washington state pay for health care. People must be protected from bankruptcy due to catastrophic illness.
(d) Invest in prevention and wellness. Invest in public health measures proven to reduce cost drivers in our system, such as obesity, sedentary lifestyles, and smoking, as well as guarantee access to proven preventive treatments.
(e) Provide portability of coverage. People should not be locked into their job just to secure health coverage, and no American should be denied coverage because of preexisting conditions.
(f) Aim for universality. Building on the work of the blue ribbon commission and other state health care reform initiatives and recognizing the current economic climate, the state will partner with national health care reform efforts toward a goal of enabling all Washingtonians to have access to affordable, effective health care by 2014 as economic conditions and national reforms indicate.
(g) Improve patient safety and quality care. Ensure the implementation of proven patient safety measures and provide incentives for changes in the delivery system to reduce unnecessary variability in patient care. Support the widespread use of health information technology with rigorous privacy protections and the development of data on the effectiveness of medical interventions to improve the quality of care delivered.
(h) Maintain long-term fiscal sustainability. Any reform plan must pay for itself by reducing the level of cost growth, improving productivity, dedicating additional sources of revenue, and defining the appropriate role of the private and public sectors in financing health care coverage in Washington state.
(2) Over the past twenty years, both the private and public health care sectors in the state of Washington have implemented policies that are consistent with the principles in subsection (1) of this section. Most recently, the governor's blue ribbon commission on health reform agreed to recommendations that are highly consistent with those principles. Current policies in Washington state in accord with those principles include:
(a) With respect to aiming for universality and access to a choice of affordable health care plans and health care providers:
(i) The Washington basic health plan offers affordable health coverage to low-income families and individuals in Washington state through a choice of private managed health care plans and health care providers;
(ii) Apple health for kids will achieve its dual goals that every child in Washington state have health care coverage by 2010 and that the health status of children in Washington state be improved. Only four percent of children in Washington state lack health insurance, due largely to efforts to expand coverage that began in 1993;
(iii) Through the health insurance partnership program, Washington state has designed the infrastructure for a health insurance exchange for small employers that would give employers and employees a choice of private health benefit plans and health care providers, offer portability of coverage and provide a mechanism to offer premium subsidies to low-wage employees of these employers;
(iv) Purchasers, insurance carriers, and health care providers are working together to significantly reduce health care administrative costs. These efforts have already produced efficiencies, and will continue through the activities provided in *Second Substitute Senate Bill No. 5346, if enacted by the 2009 legislature; and
(v) Over one hundred thousand Washingtonians have enrolled in the state's discount prescription drug card program, saving consumers over six million dollars in prescription drug costs since February 2007, with an average discount of twenty-two dollars or forty-three percent of the price of each prescription filled.
(b) With respect to improving patient safety and quality of care and investing in prevention and wellness, the public and private health care sectors are engaged in numerous nationally recognized efforts:
(i) The Puget Sound health alliance is a national leader in identifying evidence-based health care practices, and reporting to the public on health care provider performance with respect to these practices. Many of these practices address disease prevention and management of chronic illness;
(ii) The Washington state health technology assessment program and prescription drug program use medical evidence and independent clinical advisors to guide the purchasing of clinically and cost-effective health care services by state purchased health care programs;
(iii) Washington state's health record bank pilot projects are testing a new model of patient controlled electronic health records in three geographic regions of the state. The state has also provided grants to a number of small provider practices to help them implement electronic health records;
(iv) Efforts are underway to ensure that the people of Washington state have a medical home, with primary care providers able to understand their needs, meet their care needs effectively, better manage their chronic illnesses, and coordinate their care across the health care system. These efforts include group health cooperative of Puget Sound's medical home projects, care collaboratives sponsored by the state department of health, state agency chronic care management pilot projects, development of apple health for kids health improvement measures as indicators of children having a medical home, and implementation of medical home reimbursement pilot projects under **Substitute Senate Bill No. 5891, if enacted by the 2009 legislature; and
(v) Health care providers, purchasers, the state, and private quality improvement organizations are partnering to undertake numerous patient safety efforts, including hospital and ambulatory surgery center adverse events reporting, with root cause analysis to identify actions to be undertaken to prevent further adverse events; reporting of hospital acquired infections and undertaking efforts to reduce the rate of these infections; developing a surgical care outcomes assessment program that includes a presurgery checklist to reduce medical errors; and developing a patient decision aid pilot to more fully inform patients of the risks and benefits of treatment alternatives, decrease unnecessary procedures and variation in care, and provide increased legal protection to physicians whose patients use a patient decision aid to provide informed consent.

NOTES:

Reviser's note: *(1) Second Substitute Senate Bill No. 5346 became chapter 298, Laws of 2009.
**(2) Substitute Senate Bill No. 5891 became chapter 305, Laws of 2009.
Findings2009 c 545: "The legislature finds that the principles for health care reform articulated by the president of the United States in his proposed federal fiscal year 2010 budget to the congress of the United States provide an opportunity for the state of Washington to be both a partner with, and a model for, the federal government in its health care reform efforts. The legislature further finds that the recommendations of the 2007 blue ribbon commission on health care costs and access are consistent with these principles." [ 2009 c 545 § 1.]



Definitions.

Unless a different meaning is plainly required by the context, the following words and phrases as hereinafter used in RCW 43.06.010, and 43.06.200 through 43.06.270 each as now or hereafter amended shall have the following meaning:
"State of emergency" means an emergency proclaimed as such by the governor pursuant to RCW 43.06.010 as now or hereafter amended.
"Governor" means the governor of this state or, in case of his or her removal, death, resignation or inability to discharge the powers and duties of his or her office, then the person who may exercise the powers of governor pursuant to the Constitution and laws of this state relating to succession in office.
"Criminal offense" means any prohibited act for which any criminal penalty is imposed by law and includes any misdemeanor, gross misdemeanor, or felony.

NOTES:

Severability1977 ex.s. c 328: See note following RCW 43.21G.010.
SeverabilityEffective date1975-'76 2nd ex.s. c 108: See notes following RCW 43.21F.010.
Provisions cumulative1969 ex.s. c 186: "The provisions of this act shall be cumulative to and shall not operate to repeal any other laws, or local ordinances, except those specifically mentioned in this act." [ 1969 ex.s. c 186 § 10.]
Severability1969 ex.s. c 186: "If any provision of this act, or its application to any person or circumstance is held invalid, the remainder of the act, or the application of the provision to other persons or circumstances is not affected." [ 1969 ex.s. c 186 § 11.]
Energy supply emergencies: Chapter 43.21G RCW.



ProclamationsGenerallyState of emergency.

The proclamation of a state of emergency and other proclamations or orders issued by the governor pursuant to RCW 43.06.010, and 43.06.200 through 43.06.270 as now or hereafter amended shall be in writing and shall be signed by the governor and shall then be filed with the secretary of state. A proclamation of a state of emergency is effective upon the governor's signature. The governor shall give as much public notice as practical through the news media of the issuance of proclamations or orders pursuant to RCW 43.06.010, and 43.06.200 through 43.06.270 as now or hereafter amended. The state of emergency shall cease to exist upon the issuance of a proclamation of the governor declaring its termination: PROVIDED, That the governor must terminate said state of emergency proclamation when order has been restored in the area affected.

NOTES:

Severability1977 ex.s. c 328: See note following RCW 43.21G.010.
SeverabilityEffective date1975-'76 2nd ex.s. c 108: See notes following RCW 43.21F.010.
Energy supply emergencies: Chapter 43.21G RCW.



State of emergencyPowers of governor pursuant to proclamation.

(1) The governor after proclaiming a state of emergency and prior to terminating such, may, in the area described by the proclamation issue an order prohibiting:
(a) Any person being on the public streets, or in the public parks, or at any other public place during the hours declared by the governor to be a period of curfew;
(b) Any number of persons, as designated by the governor, from assembling or gathering on the public streets, parks, or other open areas of this state, either public or private;
(c) The manufacture, transfer, use, possession or transportation of a molotov cocktail or any other device, instrument or object designed to explode or produce uncontained combustion;
(d) The transporting, possessing or using of gasoline, kerosene, or combustible, flammable, or explosive liquids or materials in a glass or uncapped container of any kind except in connection with the normal operation of motor vehicles, normal home use or legitimate commercial use;
(e) The sale, purchase or dispensing of alcoholic beverages;
(f) The sale, purchase or dispensing of other commodities or goods, as he or she reasonably believes should be prohibited to help preserve and maintain life, health, property or the public peace;
(g) The use of certain streets, highways or public ways by the public; and
(h) Such other activities as he or she reasonably believes should be prohibited to help preserve and maintain life, health, property or the public peace.
(2) The governor after proclaiming a state of emergency and prior to terminating such may, in the area described by the proclamation, issue an order or orders concerning waiver or suspension of statutory obligations or limitations in the following areas:
(a) Liability for participation in interlocal agreements;
(b) Inspection fees owed to the department of labor and industries;
(c) Application of the family emergency assistance program;
(d) Regulations, tariffs, and notice requirements under the jurisdiction of the utilities and transportation commission;
(e) Application of tax due dates and penalties relating to collection of taxes;
(f) Permits for industrial, business, or medical uses of alcohol; and
(g) Such other statutory and regulatory obligations or limitations prescribing the procedures for conduct of state business, or the orders, rules, or regulations of any state agency if strict compliance with the provision of any statute, order, rule, or regulation would in any way prevent, hinder, or delay necessary action in coping with the emergency, unless (i) authority to waive or suspend a specific statutory or regulatory obligation or limitation has been expressly granted to another statewide elected official, (ii) the waiver or suspension would conflict with federal requirements that are a prescribed condition to the allocation of federal funds to the state, or (iii) the waiver or suspension would conflict with the rights, under the First Amendment, of freedom of speech or of the people to peaceably assemble. The governor shall give as much notice as practical to legislative leadership and impacted local governments when issuing orders under this subsection (2)(g).
(3) In imposing the restrictions provided for by RCW 43.06.010, and 43.06.200 through 43.06.270, the governor may impose them for such times, upon such conditions, with such exceptions and in such areas of this state he or she from time to time deems necessary.
(4) No order or orders concerning waiver or suspension of statutory obligations or limitations under subsection (2) of this section may continue for longer than thirty days unless extended by the legislature through concurrent resolution. If the legislature is not in session, the waiver or suspension of statutory obligations or limitations may be extended in writing by the leadership of the senate and the house of representatives until the legislature can extend the waiver or suspension by concurrent resolution. For purposes of this section, "leadership of the senate and the house of representatives" means the majority and minority leaders of the senate and the speaker and the minority leader of the house of representatives.
(5) Any person willfully violating any provision of an order issued by the governor under this section is guilty of a gross misdemeanor.

NOTES:

FindingsIntent2019 c 472: "(1)(a) The legislature finds that the governor has broad authority to proclaim a state of emergency in any area of the state under RCW 43.06.010(12), and to exercise emergency powers during the emergency. These emergency powers have historically included the ability under RCW 43.06.220(1)(h) to temporarily waive or suspend statutory obligations by prohibiting compliance with statutory provisions during a proclaimed state of emergency when the governor reasonably believed it would help preserve and maintain life, health, property, or the public peace.
(b) The legislature further finds that, in response to issues arising from flooding events in 2007, RCW 43.06.220(2) was amended by chapter 181, Laws of 2008, to explicitly authorize the governor to temporarily waive or suspend a set of specifically identified statutes. This amendment has become problematic for subsequent emergency response activities because it has inadvertently narrowed the governor's ability to waive or suspend statutes under RCW 43.06.220(1)(h) by issuing orders temporarily prohibiting compliance with statutes not expressly identified in RCW 43.06.220(2).
(2) The legislature intends to allow the governor to immediately respond during a proclaimed state of emergency by temporarily waiving or suspending other statutory obligations or limitations prescribing the procedures for conduct of state business, or the orders, rules, or regulations of any state agency, if strict compliance would in any way prevent, hinder, or delay necessary action in coping with the emergency." [ 2019 c 472 § 1.]
Part headings not law2008 c 181: "Part headings used in this act are not any part of the law." [ 2008 c 181 § 701.]
IntentEffective date2003 c 53: See notes following RCW 2.48.180.



State of emergencyDestroying or damaging property or causing personal injuryPenalty.

After the proclamation of a state of emergency as provided in RCW 43.06.010, any person who maliciously destroys or damages any real or personal property or maliciously injures another is guilty of a class B felony and upon conviction thereof shall be imprisoned in a state correctional facility for not less than two years nor more than ten years.

NOTES:

IntentEffective date2003 c 53: See notes following RCW 2.48.180.



State of emergencyDisorderly conduct after emergency proclaimedPenalty.

After the proclamation of a state of emergency pursuant to RCW 43.06.010, every person who:
(1) Wilfully causes public inconvenience, annoyance, or alarm, or recklessly creates a risk thereof, by:
(a) engaging in fighting or in violent, tumultuous, or threatening behavior; or
(b) making an unreasonable noise or an offensively coarse utterance, gesture, or display, or addressing abusive language to any person present; or
(c) dispersing any lawful procession or meeting of persons, not being a peace officer of this state and without lawful authority; or
(d) creating a hazardous or physically offensive condition which serves no legitimate purpose; or
(2) Engages with at least one other person in a course of conduct as defined in subsection (1) of this section which is likely to cause substantial harm or serious inconvenience, annoyance, or alarm, and refuses or knowingly fails to obey an order to disperse made by a peace officer shall be guilty of disorderly conduct and be punished by imprisonment in the county jail for up to three hundred sixty-four days or fined not more than one thousand dollars or by both fine and imprisonment.

NOTES:

FindingsIntent2011 c 96: See note following RCW 9A.20.021.



State of emergencyRefusing to leave public way or property when orderedPenalty.

Any person upon any public way or any public property, within the area described in the state of emergency, who is directed by a public official to leave the public way or public property and refuses to do so shall be guilty of a misdemeanor.



State of emergencyProsecution of persons sixteen years or over as adults.

After the proclamation of a state of emergency as provided in RCW 43.06.010 any person sixteen years of age or over who violates any provision of RCW 43.06.010, and 43.06.200 through 43.06.270 shall be prosecuted as an adult.



State of emergencyState militia or state patrolUse in restoring order.

The governor may in his or her discretion order the state militia pursuant to chapter 38.08 RCW or the state patrol to assist local officials to restore order in the area described in the proclamation of a state of emergency.



Washington quality award councilOrganizationDuties.

(1) The Washington quality award council shall be organized as a private, nonprofit corporation, in accordance with chapter 24.03 RCW and this section.
(2) The council shall oversee the governor's Washington state quality award program. The purpose of the program is to improve the overall competitiveness of the state's economy by stimulating Washington state industries, business, and organizations to bring about measurable success through setting standards of organizational excellence, encouraging organizational self-assessment, identifying successful organizations as role models, and providing a valuable mechanism for promoting and strengthening a commitment to continuous quality improvement in all sectors of the state's economy. The governor shall annually present the award to organizations that improve the quality of their products and services and are noteworthy examples of high-performing work organizations, as determined by the council in consultation with the governor or appointed representative.
(3) The governor shall appoint a representative to serve on the board of directors of the council.
(4) The council shall establish a board of examiners, a recognition committee, and such other committees or subgroups as it deems appropriate to carry out its responsibilities.
(5) The council may conduct such public information, research, education, and assistance programs as it deems appropriate to further quality improvement in organizations operating in the state of Washington.
(6) The council shall:
(a) Approve and announce award recipients;
(b) Approve guidelines to examine applicant organizations;
(c) Approve appointment of board of examiners; and
(d) Arrange appropriate annual awards and recognition for recipients.



Washington marine resources advisory council. (Expires June 30, 2022.)

(1) The Washington marine resources advisory council is created within the office of the governor.
(2) The Washington marine resources advisory council is composed of:
(a) The governor, or the governor's designee, who shall serve as the chair of the council;
(b) The commissioner of public lands, or the commissioner's designee;
(c) Two members of the senate, appointed by the president of the senate, one from each of the two largest caucuses in the senate;
(d) Two members of the house of representatives, appointed by the speaker of the house of representatives, one from each of the two largest caucuses in the house of representatives;
(e) One representative of federally recognized Indian tribes with reservations lying within or partially within counties bordering the outer coast, if selected by action of all of the governing bodies of all federally recognized Indian tribes in such an area;
(f) One representative of federally recognized Indian tribes with reservations lying within or partially within counties bordering Puget Sound, if selected by action of all of the governing bodies of all federally recognized Indian tribes in such an area;
(g) One representative of each of the following sectors, appointed by the governor:
(i) Commercial fishing;
(ii) Recreational fishing;
(iii) Marine recreation and tourism, other than fishing;
(iv) Coastal shellfish growers;
(v) Puget Sound shellfish growers;
(vi) Marine businesses; and
(vii) Conservation organizations;
(h) The chair of the Washington state conservation commission, or the chair's designee;
(i) One representative appointed by the largest statewide general agricultural association;
(j) One representative appointed by the largest statewide business association;
(k) The chair of the Washington coastal marine advisory council;
(l) The chair of the leadership council of the Puget Sound partnership;
(m) The director of the department of ecology;
(n) The director of the department of fish and wildlife; and
(o) The chair of the Northwest Straits commission.
(3) The governor shall invite the participation of the following entities as nonvoting members:
(a) The national oceanic and atmospheric administration; and
(b) Academic institutions conducting scientific research on ocean acidification.
(4) The governor shall make the appointments of the members under subsection (2)(g) of this section by September 1, 2013.
(5) Any member appointed by the governor may be removed by the governor for cause.
(6) A majority of the voting members of the Washington marine resources advisory council constitute a quorum for the transaction of business.
(7) The chair of the Washington marine resources advisory council shall schedule meetings and establish the agenda. The first meeting of the council must be scheduled by November 1, 2013. The council shall meet at least twice per calendar year. At each meeting the council shall afford an opportunity to the public to comment upon agenda items and other matters relating to the protection and conservation of the state's ocean resources.
(8) The Washington marine resources advisory council shall have the following powers and duties:
(a) To maintain a sustainable coordinated focus, including the involvement of and the collaboration among all levels of government and nongovernmental entities, the private sector, and citizens by increasing the state's ability to work to address impacts of ocean acidification;
(b) To advise and work with the University of Washington and others to conduct ongoing technical analysis on the effects and sources of ocean acidification. The recommendations must identify a range of actions necessary to implement the recommendations and take into consideration the differences between instate impacts and sources and out-of-state impacts and sources;
(c) To deliver recommendations to the governor and appropriate committees in the Washington state senate and house of representatives that must include, as necessary, any minority reports requested by a councilmember;
(d) To seek public and private funding resources necessary, and the commitment of other resources, for ongoing technical analysis to support the council's recommendations; and
(e) To assist in conducting public education activities regarding the impacts of and contributions to ocean acidification and regarding implementation strategies to support the actions adopted by the legislature.
(9) This section expires June 30, 2022.



Foreign nationals or citizens, convicted offendersTransfers and sentences.

Whenever any convicted offender, who is a citizen or national of a foreign country and is under the jurisdiction of the department of corrections, requests transfer to the foreign country of which he or she is a citizen or national, under a treaty on the transfer of offenders entered into between the United States and a foreign country, the governor or the governor's designee:
(1) May grant the approval of the state to such transfer as provided in the treaty; and
(2) Shall have, notwithstanding any provision of chapter 9.95 or 72.68 RCW, the plenary authority to fix the duration of the offender's sentence, if not otherwise fixed, whenever a fixed sentence is a condition precedent to transfer.



Listing of reduction in revenues from tax exemptions to be submitted to legislature by department of revenuePeriodic review and submission of recommendations to legislature by governor.

(1) Beginning in January 1984, and in January of every fourth year thereafter, the department of revenue must submit to the legislature prior to the regular session a listing of the amount of reduction for the current and next biennium in the revenues of the state or the revenues of local government collected by the state as a result of tax exemptions. The listing must include an estimate of the revenue lost from the tax exemption, the purpose of the tax exemption, the persons, organizations, or parts of the population which benefit from the tax exemption, and whether or not the tax exemption conflicts with another state program. The listing must include but not be limited to the following revenue sources:
(a) Real and personal property tax exemptions under Title 84 RCW;
(b) Business and occupation tax exemptions, deductions, and credits under chapter 82.04 RCW;
(c) Retail sales and use tax exemptions under chapters 82.08, 82.12, and 82.14 RCW;
(d) Public utility tax exemptions and deductions under chapter 82.16 RCW;
(e) Food fish and shellfish tax exemptions under chapter 82.27 RCW;
(f) Leasehold excise tax exemptions under chapter 82.29A RCW;
(g) Motor vehicle and special fuel tax exemptions and refunds under chapter 82.38 RCW;
(h) Aircraft fuel tax exemptions under chapter 82.42 RCW;
(i) Motor vehicle excise tax exclusions under chapter 82.44 RCW; and
(j) Insurance premiums tax exemptions under chapter 48.14 RCW.
(2) The department of revenue must prepare the listing required by this section with the assistance of any other agencies or departments as may be required.
(3) The department of revenue must present the listing to the ways and means committees of each house in public hearings.
(4) Beginning in January 1984, and every four years thereafter the governor is requested to review the report from the department of revenue and may submit recommendations to the legislature with respect to the repeal or modification of any tax exemption. The ways and means committees of each house and the appropriate standing committee of each house must hold public hearings and take appropriate action on the recommendations submitted by the governor.
(5) As used in this section, "tax exemption" means an exemption, exclusion, or deduction from the base of a tax; a credit against a tax; a deferral of a tax; or a preferential tax rate.
(6) For purposes of the listing due in January 2012, the department of revenue does not have to prepare or update the listing with respect to any tax exemption that would not be likely to increase state revenue if the exemption was repealed or otherwise eliminated.

NOTES:

Effective date2013 c 225: See note following RCW 82.38.010.
ConstructionSeverabilityEffective dates1983 2nd ex.s. c 3: See notes following RCW 82.04.255.
Review and termination of tax preferences: Chapter 43.136 RCW.



State internship programGovernor's duties.

There is established within the office of the governor the Washington state internship program to assist students and state employees in gaining valuable experience and knowledge in various areas of state government. In administering the program, the governor shall:
(1) Consult with the secretary of state, the director of enterprise services, the commissioner of the employment security department, and representatives of labor;
(2) Encourage and assist agencies in developing intern positions;
(3) Develop and coordinate a selection process for placing individuals in intern positions. This selection process shall give due regard to the responsibilities of the state to provide equal employment opportunities;
(4) Develop and coordinate a training component of the internship program which balances the need for training and exposure to new ideas with the intern's and agency's need for on-the-job work experience;
(5) Work with institutions of higher education in developing the program, soliciting qualified applicants, and selecting participants; and
(6) Develop guidelines for compensation of the participants.

NOTES:

Effective datePurpose2011 1st sp.s. c 43: See notes following RCW 43.19.003.
Effective date1993 c 281: See note following RCW 41.06.022.
Construction1985 c 442: "Nothing in this act shall be construed to limit the authority of state agencies to continue or establish other internship programs or positions." [ 1985 c 442 § 10.]
Severability1985 c 442: "If any provision of this act or its application to any person or circumstance is held invalid, the remainder of the act or the application of the provision to other persons or circumstances is not affected." [ 1985 c 442 § 11.]



State internship program coordinatorRules.

(1) The governor may appoint a coordinator to assist in administering the program created by RCW 43.06.410.
(2) The governor shall adopt such rules as are necessary to administer RCW 43.06.410.

NOTES:

ConstructionSeverability1985 c 442: See notes following RCW 43.06.410.



Undergraduate internship programExecutive fellows program.

The state internship program shall consist of two individual internship programs as follows:
(1) An undergraduate internship program consisting of three-month to six-month positions for students working toward an undergraduate degree. In addition, a public sector employee, whether working toward a degree or not, shall be eligible to participate in the program upon the written recommendation of the head of the employee's agency.
(2) An executive fellows program consisting of one-year to two-year placements for students who have successfully completed at least one year of graduate level work and have demonstrated a substantial interest in public sector management. Positions in this program shall be as assistants or analysts at the midmanagement level or higher. In addition, a public sector employee, whether working toward an advanced degree or not, or who has not successfully completed one year of graduate-level work as required by this subsection, shall be eligible to participate in the program upon the written recommendation of the head of the employee's agency. Participants in the executive fellows program who were not public employees prior to accepting a position in the program shall receive insurance and retirement credit commensurate with other employees of the employing agency.

NOTES:

ConstructionSeverability1985 c 442: See notes following RCW 43.06.410.



InternsEffect of employment experienceRights of reversionFringe benefitsSick and vacation leave.

The director of financial management or the director's designee shall adopt rules to provide that:
(1) Successful completion of an internship under RCW 43.06.420 shall be considered as employment experience at the level at which the intern was placed;
(2) Persons leaving classified or exempt positions in state government in order to take an internship under RCW 43.06.420: (a) Have the right of reversion to the previous position at any time during the internship or upon completion of the internship; and (b) shall continue to receive all fringe benefits as if they had never left their classified or exempt positions;
(3) Participants in the undergraduate internship program who were not public employees prior to accepting a position in the program receive sick leave allowances commensurate with other state employees;
(4) Participants in the executive fellows program who were not public employees prior to accepting a position in the program receive sick and vacation leave allowances commensurate with other state employees.

NOTES:

Effective datePurpose2011 1st sp.s. c 43: See notes following RCW 43.19.003.
Short titleHeadings, captions not lawSeverabilityEffective dates2002 c 354: See RCW 41.80.907 through 41.80.910.
Effective date1993 c 281: See note following RCW 41.06.022.
ConstructionSeverability1985 c 442: See notes following RCW 43.06.410.
State internship programPositions exempt from chapter 41.06 RCW: RCW 41.06.088.



InternsEffect on full time equivalent staff position limitations.

An agency shall not be deemed to exceed any limitation on full time equivalent staff positions on the basis of intern positions established under RCW 43.06.420.

NOTES:

ConstructionSeverability1985 c 442: See notes following RCW 43.06.410.



Cigarette tax contractsIntentFindingLimitations. (Effective until October 1, 2019.)

The legislature intends to further the government-to-government relationship between the state of Washington and Indians in the state of Washington by authorizing the governor to enter into contracts concerning the sale of cigarettes. The legislature finds that these cigarette tax contracts will provide a means to promote economic development, provide needed revenues for tribal governments and Indian persons, and enhance enforcement of the state's cigarette tax law, ultimately saving the state money and reducing conflict. In addition, it is the intent of the legislature that the negotiations and the ensuing contracts shall have no impact on the state's share of the proceeds under the master settlement agreement entered into on November 23, 1998, by the state. Chapter 235, Laws of 2001 does not constitute a grant of taxing authority to any Indian tribe nor does it provide precedent for the taxation of non-Indians on fee land.

Cigarette tax contractsIntentFindingLimitations. (Effective October 1, 2019.)

The legislature intends to further the government-to-government relationship between the state of Washington and Indians in the state of Washington by authorizing the governor to enter into contracts concerning the sale of cigarettes and vapor products. The legislature finds that these cigarette tax and vapor product tax contracts will provide a means to promote economic development, provide needed revenues for tribal governments and Indian persons, and enhance enforcement of the state's cigarette tax and vapor product tax, ultimately saving the state money and reducing conflict. In addition, it is the intent of the legislature that the negotiations and the ensuing contracts have no impact on the state's share of the proceeds under the master settlement agreement entered into on November 23, 1998, by the state. Chapter 235, Laws of 2001 and chapter 445, Laws of 2019 do not constitute a grant of taxing authority to any Indian tribe nor do they provide precedent for the taxation of non-Indians on fee land.

NOTES:

Conflict with federal requirementsEffective date2019 c 445: See RCW 82.25.900 and 82.25.901.
Automatic expiration date and tax preference performance statement exemption2019 c 445: See note following RCW 82.08.0318.



Cigarette tax contractsRequirementsUse of revenueEnforcementDefinitions.

(1) The governor may enter into cigarette tax contracts concerning the sale of cigarettes. All cigarette tax contracts shall meet the requirements for cigarette tax contracts under this section. Except for cigarette tax contracts under RCW 43.06.460, the rates, revenue sharing, and exemption terms of a cigarette tax contract are not effective unless authorized in a bill enacted by the legislature.
(2) Cigarette tax contracts shall be in regard to retail sales in which Indian retailers make delivery and physical transfer of possession of the cigarettes from the seller to the buyer within Indian country, and are not in regard to transactions by non-Indian retailers. In addition, contracts shall provide that retailers shall not sell or give, or permit to be sold or given, cigarettes to any person under the age of eighteen years.
(3) A cigarette tax contract with a tribe shall provide for a tribal cigarette tax in lieu of all state cigarette taxes and state and local sales and use taxes on sales of cigarettes in Indian country by Indian retailers. The tribe may allow an exemption for sales to tribal members.
(4) Cigarette tax contracts shall provide that all cigarettes possessed or sold by a retailer shall bear a cigarette stamp obtained by wholesalers from a bank or other suitable stamp vendor and applied to the cigarettes. The procedures to be used by the tribe in obtaining tax stamps must include a means to assure that the tribal tax will be paid by the wholesaler obtaining such cigarettes. Tribal stamps must have serial numbers or some other discrete identification so that each stamp can be traced to its source.
(5) Cigarette tax contracts shall provide that retailers shall purchase cigarettes only from:
(a) Wholesalers or manufacturers licensed to do business in the state of Washington;
(b) Out-of-state wholesalers or manufacturers who, although not licensed to do business in the state of Washington, agree to comply with the terms of the cigarette tax contract, are certified to the state as having so agreed, and who do in fact so comply. However, the state may in its sole discretion exercise its administrative and enforcement powers over such wholesalers or manufacturers to the extent permitted by law;
(c) A tribal wholesaler that purchases only from a wholesaler or manufacturer described in (a), (b), or (d) of this subsection; and
(d) A tribal manufacturer.
(6) Cigarette tax contracts shall be for renewable periods of no more than eight years. A renewal may not include a renewal of the phase-in period.
(7) Cigarette tax contracts shall include provisions for compliance, such as transport and notice requirements, inspection procedures, stamping requirements, recordkeeping, and audit requirements.
(8) Tax revenue retained by a tribe must be used for essential government services. Use of tax revenue for subsidization of cigarette and food retailers is prohibited.
(9) The cigarette tax contract may include provisions to resolve disputes using a nonjudicial process, such as mediation.
(10) The governor may delegate the power to negotiate cigarette tax contracts to the department of revenue. The department of revenue shall consult with the *liquor control board during the negotiations.
(11) Information received by the state or open to state review under the terms of a contract is subject to the provisions of RCW 82.32.330.
(12) It is the intent of the legislature that the *liquor control board and the department of revenue continue the division of duties and shared authority under chapter 82.24 RCW and therefore the *liquor control board is responsible for enforcement activities that come under the terms of chapter 82.24 RCW.
(13) Each cigarette tax contract shall include a procedure for notifying the other party that a violation has occurred, a procedure for establishing whether a violation has in fact occurred, an opportunity to correct such violation, and a provision providing for termination of the contract should the violation fail to be resolved through this process, such termination subject to mediation should the terms of the contract so allow. A contract shall provide for termination of the contract if resolution of a dispute does not occur within twenty-four months from the time notification of a violation has occurred. Intervening violations do not extend this time period. In addition, the contract shall include provisions delineating the respective roles and responsibilities of the tribe, the department of revenue, and the *liquor control board.
(14) For purposes of this section and RCW 43.06.460, 82.08.0316, 82.12.0316, and 82.24.295:
(a) "Essential government services" means services such as tribal administration, public facilities, fire, police, public health, education, job services, sewer, water, environmental and land use, transportation, utility services, and economic development;
(b) "Indian retailer" or "retailer" means (i) a retailer wholly owned and operated by an Indian tribe, (ii) a business wholly owned and operated by a tribal member and licensed by the tribe, or (iii) a business owned and operated by the Indian person or persons in whose name the land is held in trust; and
(c) "Indian tribe" or "tribe" means a federally recognized Indian tribe located within the geographical boundaries of the state of Washington.

NOTES:

*Reviser's note: The "state liquor control board" was renamed the "state liquor and cannabis board" by 2015 c 70 § 3.



Cigarette tax contractsEligible tribesTax rate.

(1) The governor is authorized to enter into cigarette tax contracts with the Squaxin Island Tribe, the Nisqually Tribe, Tulalip Tribes, the Muckleshoot Indian Tribe, the Quinault Nation, the Jamestown S'Klallam Indian Tribe, the Port Gamble S'Klallam Tribe, the Stillaguamish Tribe, the Sauk-Suiattle Tribe, the Skokomish Indian Tribe, the Yakama Nation, the Suquamish Tribe, the Nooksack Indian Tribe, the Lummi Nation, the Chehalis Confederated Tribes, the Upper Skagit Tribe, the Snoqualmie Tribe, the Swinomish Tribe, the Samish Indian Nation, the Quileute Tribe, the Kalispel Tribe, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, the Cowlitz Indian Tribe, the Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe, the Makah Tribe, the Hoh Tribe, the Spokane Tribe, and the Shoalwater Bay Tribe. Each contract adopted under this section shall provide that the tribal cigarette tax rate be one hundred percent of the state cigarette and state and local sales and use taxes within three years of enacting the tribal tax and shall be set no lower than eighty percent of the state cigarette and state and local sales and use taxes during the three-year phase-in period. The three-year phase-in period shall be shortened by three months each quarter the number of cartons of nontribal manufactured cigarettes is at least ten percent or more than the quarterly average number of cartons of nontribal manufactured cigarettes from the six-month period preceding the imposition of the tribal tax under the contract. Sales at a retailer operation not in existence as of the date a tribal tax under this section is imposed are subject to the full rate of the tribal tax under the contract. The tribal cigarette tax is in lieu of the state cigarette and state and local sales and use taxes, as provided in RCW 43.06.455(3).
(2) A cigarette tax contract under this section is subject to RCW 43.06.455.

NOTES:

Effective date2007 c 320: "This act is necessary for the immediate preservation of the public peace, health, or safety, or support of the state government and its existing public institutions, and takes effect July 1, 2007." [ 2007 c 320 § 2.]



Cigarette tax agreement with Puyallup Tribe of Indians.

(1) The governor may enter into a cigarette tax agreement with the Puyallup Tribe of Indians concerning the sale of cigarettes, subject to the limitations in this section. The legislature intends to address the uniqueness of the Puyallup Indian reservation and its selling environment through pricing and compliance strategies, rather than through the imposition of equivalent taxes. It is the legislature's intent (a) that an increase in prices through a flat tax will reduce much of the competitive advantage that has historically existed due to the discrepancy in the difference between state and tribal taxes, and (b) that the tribal retailers can remain in business under the changed circumstances. The governor may delegate the authority to negotiate a cigarette tax agreement with the Puyallup Tribe to the department of revenue. The department of revenue shall consult with the *liquor control board during the negotiations.
(2) Any agreement must require the tribe to impose a tax of eleven dollars and seventy-five cents on each carton of cigarettes, with ten packs a carton and twenty cigarettes per pack being the industry standard. This tax shall be prorated for cartons and packs that are nonstandard. This tribal tax is in lieu of the combined state and local sales and use taxes, and state cigarette taxes, and as such these state taxes are not imposed during the term of the agreement on any transaction governed by the agreement. The tribal tax shall increase or decrease by the same dollar amount as any increase or decrease in the state cigarette tax.
(3) The agreement must include a provision requiring the tribe to transmit thirty percent of the tribal tax revenue on all cigarette sales to the state. The funds shall be transmitted to the state treasurer on a quarterly basis for deposit by the state treasurer into the general fund. The remaining tribal tax revenue must be used for essential government services, as that term is defined in RCW 43.06.455.
(4) The agreement is limited to retail sales in which Indian retailers make delivery and physical transfer of possession of the cigarettes from the seller to the buyer within Indian country, and are not in regard to transactions by non-Indian retailers. In addition, agreements shall provide that retailers shall not sell or give, or permit to be sold or given, cigarettes to any person under the age of eighteen years.
(5)(a) The agreement must include a provision to price and sell the cigarettes so that the retail selling price is not less than the price paid by the retailer for the cigarettes.
(b) The tribal tax is in addition to the retail selling price.
(c) The agreement must include a provision to assure the price paid to the retailer includes the tribal tax, as evidenced by the tribe's cigarette stamp.
(d) If the tribe is acting as a wholesaler to tribal retailers, the retail selling price must not be less than the price the tribe paid for such cigarettes plus the tribal tax, as evidenced by the tribe's cigarette stamp.
(6)(a) The agreement must include provisions regarding enforcement and compliance by the tribe in regard to enrolled tribal members who sell cigarettes and shall describe the individual and joint responsibilities of the tribe, the department of revenue, and the *liquor control board.
(b) The agreement must include provisions for tax administration and compliance, such as transport and notice requirements, inspection procedures, stamping requirements, recordkeeping, and audit requirements.
(c) The agreement must include provisions for sharing of information among the tribe, the department of revenue, and the *liquor control board.
(7) The agreement must provide that all cigarettes possessed or sold by a tribal retailer shall bear a tribal cigarette stamp obtained by wholesalers from a bank or other suitable stamp vendor and applied to the cigarettes. Tribal stamps must have serial numbers or some other discrete identification so that each stamp can be traced to its source.
(8) The agreement must provide that retailers shall purchase cigarettes only from wholesalers or manufacturers licensed to do business in the state of Washington.
(9) The agreement must be for a renewable period of no more than eight years.
(10) The agreement must include provisions to resolve disputes using a nonjudicial process, such as mediation, and shall include a dispute resolution protocol. The protocol shall include a procedure for notifying the other party that a violation has occurred, a procedure for establishing whether a violation has in fact occurred, an opportunity to correct such violation, and a provision providing for termination of the agreement should the violation fail to be resolved through this process, such termination subject to mediation should the terms of the agreement so allow. An agreement must provide for termination of the agreement if resolution of a dispute does not occur within twenty-four months from the time notification of a violation has occurred. Intervening violations do not extend this time period.
(11) The agreement may not include any provisions that impact the state's share of the master settlement agreement, and as such this agreement does not authorize negotiation regarding a redistribution of the state's proceeds under the master settlement agreement.
(12) Information received by the state or open to state review under the terms of an agreement is subject to RCW 82.32.330.
(13) It is the intent of the legislature that the *liquor control board and the department of revenue continue the division of duties and shared authority under chapter 82.24 RCW.
(14) For purposes of this section:
(a) "Indian country" has the same meaning as in chapter 82.24 RCW.
(b) "Indian retailer" or "retailer" means (i) a retailer wholly owned and operated by an Indian tribe or (ii) a business wholly owned and operated by an enrolled tribal member and licensed by the tribe.
(c) "Indian tribe" or "tribe" means the Puyallup Tribe of Indians, which is a federally recognized Indian tribe located within the geographical boundaries of the state of Washington.

NOTES:

*Reviser's note: The "state liquor control board" was renamed the "state liquor and cannabis board" by 2015 c 70 § 3.
FindingsIntent2005 c 11: "In 2001, the legislature enacted Engrossed Substitute Senate Bill No. 5372, which authorized the governor to enter into cigarette contracts with fourteen Indian tribes. In subsequent sessions, the legislature increased to twenty-one the number of tribes with whom the governor may negotiate under the terms of RCW 43.06.460. The legislature finds that this effort has been effective, as measured by the success of the existing agreements.
The legislature further finds the agreements resolved decades of conflict between the state and tribes over the sale of contraband cigarettes to non-Indians; benefited the tribes through tribal tax revenues; benefited the state because cigarettes are stamped and taxed; enhanced public health because access to low-priced cigarettes is reduced; improved law and order; and reduced the competitive advantage gained through the sale of tax-free cigarettes.
The 2001 legislation and its later amendments did not encompass the Puyallup Tribe of Indians within its scope due to the very different nature of the cigarette trade on the Puyallup Indian reservation. The legislature therefore intends to address the special circumstances on the Puyallup Indian reservation by recognizing the substantial distinctions and enacting legislation authorizing a cigarette tax agreement with the tribe that differs from the contracts entered into under RCW 43.06.460. Section 2 of this act provides the governor authority to enter into an agreement and sets forth the general framework for the agreement." [ 2005 c 11 § 1.]
Explanatory statementEffective date2005 c 11: "(1) On January 5, 2005, it was announced that a cigarette tax agreement had been reached between the state of Washington and the Puyallup Indian Tribe. Before being signed by the governor, the legislature must provide authorization to the governor to sign such an agreement. Because the state and the Puyallup Indian Tribe have reached an agreement in principle, time for implementation is of the essence.
(2) This act is necessary for the immediate preservation of the public peace, health, or safety, or support of the state government and its existing public institutions, and takes effect immediately [April 5, 2005]." [ 2005 c 11 § 6.]



Cigarette tax agreementYakama Nation.

(1) The legislature finds that entering into a cigarette tax agreement with the Yakama Nation is a positive step and that such an agreement will support a stable and orderly environment on the Yakima Reservation for regulation of cigarette sales. The legislature further finds that the very special circumstances of the Yakama Nation pursuant to the Treaty with the Yakamas of 1855 (12 Stat. 951) support a cigarette tax agreement that reflects those circumstances. The legislature also finds that the provisions of the agreement with the Yakama Nation authorized by chapter 228, Laws of 2008 are reasonably necessary to prevent fraudulent transactions and place a minimal burden on the Yakama Nation, pursuant to the United States supreme court's decision in Washington v. Confederated Tribes of the Colville Indian Reservation, 447 U.S. 134 (1980).
It is the intent of the legislature that the cigarette tax agreement with the Yakama Nation reflects the uniqueness of the Yakama Nation's Treaty through specific terms that govern pricing of cigarettes, tribal cigarette tax revenue, information sharing, and administration of the agreement.
(2) For purposes of this section:
(a) "Cigarette" has the same meaning as in chapter 82.24 RCW; and
(b) "Tribal retailer" means a cigarette retailer as that term is defined in RCW 82.24.010 that is licensed by and located within the jurisdiction of the Yakama Nation and is wholly owned by the Yakama Nation or any of its enrolled members.
(3) The governor may enter into a cigarette tax agreement with the Yakama Nation, a federally recognized Indian tribe located within the geographical boundaries of the state of Washington, concerning the sale of cigarettes, subject to the provisions of this section. The governor may delegate the authority to negotiate the agreement to the department of revenue.
(4) The agreement must be for a renewable period of no more than eight years.
(5) All cigarettes possessed or sold by tribal retailers must be subject to the agreement, except cigarettes manufactured within the jurisdiction of the Yakama Nation by the Yakama Nation or its enrolled members.
(6) The agreement must allow the Yakama Nation to exempt its enrolled members from the tribal cigarette tax imposed under subsection (7) of this section.
(a) Sales of cigarettes exempt under this subsection must be subject to the requirements of subsection (9) of this section.
(b) The exemption must be provided only at the point of sale and reimbursement provided to the tribal retailer by the Yakama Nation.
(7) The agreement must require the Yakama Nation to impose and maintain in effect on the sale of cigarettes by tribal retailers a tax as provided in this subsection.
(a) The rate of tax will be expressed in dollars and cents and must be the percentage of tax imposed by the state under chapter 82.24 RCW for the period of the agreement as stated here:
(i) Eighty percent during the first six years;
(ii) Eighty-four percent during the seventh year; and
(iii) Eighty-seven and six-tenths percent during the eighth year.
(b) The tax must be imposed on each carton, or portion of a carton, of cigarettes, with ten packs per carton and twenty cigarettes per pack being the industry standard, and prorated for cartons and packs that are not standard.
(c) The tax must be in lieu of the combined state and local sales and use taxes, and state cigarette taxes, and, as provided in RCW 82.24.302, 82.08.0316, and 82.12.0316, the taxes imposed by chapters 82.08, 82.12, and 82.24 RCW do not apply during the term of the agreement on any transaction governed by the agreement.
(d) Throughout the term of the agreement and any renewal of the agreement, the tax must increase or decrease in correspondence with the state cigarette tax by applying the percentages in (a) of this subsection.
(8) The revenue generated by the tax imposed under subsection (7) of this section must be used by the Yakama Nation for essential government services, as that term is defined in RCW 43.06.455.
(9) All cigarettes possessed or sold by a tribal retailer must bear a tribal cigarette tax stamp as provided in this subsection.
(a) The Yakama Nation may act as its own stamp vendor, subject to meeting reasonable requirements for internal controls.
(b) The stamps must have serial numbers or other discrete identification that allow stamps to be traced to their source.
(10) The price paid by the tribal retailer to the wholesaler must not be less than the total of the price paid by the Yakama Nation or other wholesaler and the tax imposed under subsection (7) of this section.
(11) The retail selling price of cigarettes sold by tribal retailers must not be less than the price paid by them under subsection (10) of this section.
(12) Tribal retailers must not sell or give, or permit to be sold or given, cigarettes to any person under the age of eighteen years.
(13) The authority and the individual and joint responsibility of the Yakama Nation, the department of revenue, and the *liquor control board for administration and enforcement must be specified in the agreement including, but not limited to, requirements regarding transport of cigarettes, keeping of records, reporting, notice, inspection, audit, and mutual exchange of information.
(a) Requirements must provide for sharing of information regarding transport of cigarettes in the state of Washington by the Yakama Nation or its enrolled members, reporting of information on sales to customers located outside the jurisdiction of the Yakama Nation, and authority for unannounced inspection by the state of tribal retailers to verify compliance with stamping and pricing provisions.
(b) Information received by the state or open to state review under the terms of the agreement is subject to RCW 82.32.330.
(14) The agreement must provide for resolution of disputes using a nonjudicial process, such as mediation, and establish a dispute resolution protocol that includes the following elements:
(a) A procedure for notifying the other party that a violation has occurred;
(b) A procedure for establishing whether a violation has in fact occurred;
(c) An opportunity to correct the violation;
(d) A procedure for terminating the agreement in the event of a failure to correct the violation, such termination subject to mediation should the terms of the agreement so allow; and
(e) Termination of the agreement for cause.
(15) The agreement may not include any provisions that impact the state's share of the master settlement agreement or concern redistribution of the state's proceeds under the master settlement agreement.
(16) The department of revenue may share with the Yakama Nation tax information under RCW 82.32.330 that is necessary for the Yakama Nation's compliance with the agreement.

NOTES:

*Reviser's note: The "state liquor control board" was renamed the "state liquor and cannabis board" by 2015 c 70 § 3.
Authorization for agreement2008 c 228: "In December 2007 it was announced that a cigarette tax agreement between the state of Washington and the Yakama Nation had been reached in principle. The legislature must provide authorization to the governor to sign such an agreement. Because the parties have reached an agreement in principle, time for implementation is of the essence." [ 2008 c 228 § 5.]
Effective date2008 c 228: "This act is necessary for the immediate preservation of the public peace, health, or safety, or support of the state government and its existing public institutions, and takes effect immediately [March 28, 2008]." [ 2008 c 228 § 6.]



Raising the minimum legal age of sale in certain compactsConsultations with federally recognized Indian tribesReport to legislature. (Effective October 1, 2019.)

In recognition of the sovereign authority of tribal governments, the governor may seek government-to-government consultations with federally recognized Indian tribes regarding raising the minimum legal age of sale in compacts entered into pursuant to RCW 43.06.455, 43.06.465, 43.06.466, and 43.06.505 through 43.06.515. The office of the governor shall report to the appropriate committees of the legislature regarding the status of such consultations no later than December 1, 2020.

NOTES:

Reviser's note: 2019 c 445 § 307 takes effect October 1, 2019; however, this session law amended 2019 c 15 § 11, which takes effect January 1, 2020.
Conflict with federal requirementsEffective date2019 c 445: See RCW 82.25.900 and 82.25.901.
Automatic expiration date and tax preference performance statement exemption2019 c 445: See note following RCW 82.08.0318.
Effective date2019 c 15: See note following RCW 26.28.080.



Timber harvest excise tax agreements.

(1) The governor may enter into timber harvest excise tax agreements concerning the harvest of timber. All timber harvest excise tax agreements must meet the requirements for timber harvest excise tax agreements under this section. The terms of a timber harvest excise tax agreement are not effective unless the agreement is authorized in RCW 43.06.480.
(2) Timber harvest excise tax agreements shall be in regard to timber harvests on fee land within the exterior boundaries of the reservation of the Indian tribe and are not in regard to timber harvests on trust land or land owned by the tribe within the exterior boundaries of the reservation.
(3) The agreement must provide that the tribal tax shall be credited against the state and county taxes imposed under RCW 84.33.041 and 84.33.051.
(4) Tribal ordinances for timber harvest excise taxation, or other authorizing tribal laws, which implement the timber harvest excise tax agreement with the state, must incorporate or contain provisions identical to chapter 84.33 RCW that relate to the tax rates and measures, such as stumpage values.
(5) Timber harvest excise tax agreements must be for renewable periods of no more than eight years.
(6) Timber harvest excise tax agreements must include provisions for compliance, such as inspection procedures, recordkeeping, and audit requirements.
(7) Tax revenue retained by the tribe must be used for essential government services. Use of tax revenue for subsidization of timber harvesters is prohibited.
(8) The timber harvest excise tax agreement may include provisions to resolve disputes using a nonjudicial process, such as mediation.
(9) The governor may delegate the power to negotiate the timber harvest excise tax agreements to the department of revenue.
(10) Information received by the state or open to state review under the terms of a timber harvest excise tax agreement is subject to the provisions of RCW 82.32.330. The department of revenue may enter into an information sharing agreement with the tribe to facilitate sharing information to improve tax collection.
(11) The timber harvest excise tax agreement must include dispute resolution procedures, contract termination procedures, and provisions delineating the respective roles and responsibilities of the tribe and the department of revenue.
(12) The timber harvest excise tax agreement must include provisions to require taxpayers to submit information that may be required by the department of revenue or tribe.
(13) For the purposes of this section:
(a) "Essential government services" means services such as forestland management; protection, enhancement, regulation, and stewardship of forested land; land consolidation; tribal administration; public facilities; fire; police; public health; education; job services; sewer; water; environmental and land use; transportation; utility services; and public facilities serving economic development purposes as those terms are defined in RCW 82.14.370(3)(c);
(b) "Forestland" has the same meaning as in RCW 84.33.035;
(c) "Harvester" has the same meaning as in RCW 84.33.035;
(d) "Indian tribe" or "tribe" means a federally recognized Indian tribe located within the geographical boundaries of the state of Washington; and
(e) "Timber" has the same meaning as in RCW 84.33.035.

NOTES:

FindingsIntent2007 c 69: "The legislature finds that in certain areas of taxation, where both a tribe and the state have jurisdiction and where there are challenges to administering a tax, tax agreements between the state and a tribe are a sound approach to resolving issues and simplifying processes. The legislature specifically recognizes that in the area of the timber excise tax, within the boundaries of the Quinault Reservation, the state faces challenges due to access to land and access to taxpayers. The activity being taxed takes place entirely within the reservation and is regulated by the tribe and by the state. The legislature therefore finds that shifting from a state administered tax, to a tribal tax credited against the state tax, will bring benefits such as consistent taxation, improved forest practices and water quality, improved fisheries, and sustainability. The legislature intends to further the government-to-government relationship between the state of Washington and the Quinault Nation by authorizing the governor to enter into an agreement related to timber harvest excise taxes." [ 2007 c 69 § 1.]



Timber harvest excise tax agreementsQuinault Nation.

(1) The governor is authorized to enter into a timber harvest excise tax agreement with the Quinault Nation. Agreements adopted under this section must provide that the tribal timber harvest excise tax rate be one hundred percent of the state timber harvest excise tax.
(2) A timber harvest excise tax agreement under this section is subject to RCW 43.06.475.

NOTES:

FindingsIntent2007 c 69: See note following RCW 43.06.475.



Senior policy advisor to the governorState lead for economic development relating to the outdoor recreation sector of the state's economy.

(1) Subject to the availability of amounts appropriated for this specific purpose, the governor must maintain a senior policy advisor to the governor to serve as a state lead on economic development issues relating to the outdoor recreation sector of the state's economy. The advisor must focus on promoting, increasing participation in, and increasing opportunities for outdoor recreation in Washington, with a particular focus on achieving economic development and job growth through outdoor recreation.
(2) The success of the advisor must be based on measurable results relating to economic development strategies that more deliberately grow employment and outdoor recreation businesses, including:
(a) Strategies for increasing the number of new jobs directly or indirectly related to outdoor recreation, with a short-term goal of increasing employment in the sector by ten percent above the one hundred ninety-nine thousand jobs estimated to be connected to outdoor recreation as of 2015; and
(b) Strategies for increasing the twenty-one billion dollars of consumer spending in Washington, and the four and one-half billion dollars of spending from out-of-state visitors, estimated to be connected to outdoor recreation as of 2015.



Marijuana agreementsFederally recognized Indian tribesTribal marijuana taxTax exemption.

(1) The governor may enter into agreements with federally recognized Indian tribes concerning marijuana. Marijuana agreements may address any marijuana-related issue that involves both state and tribal interests or otherwise has an impact on tribal-state relations. Such agreements may include, but are not limited to, the following provisions and subject matter:
(a) Criminal and civil law enforcement;
(b) Regulatory issues related to the commercial production, processing, sale, and possession of marijuana, and processed marijuana products, for both recreational and medical purposes;
(c) Medical and pharmaceutical research involving marijuana;
(d) Taxation in accordance with subsection (2) of this section;
(e) Any tribal immunities or preemption of state law regarding the production, processing, or marketing of marijuana; and
(f) Dispute resolution, including the use of mediation or other nonjudicial process.
(2)(a) Each marijuana agreement adopted under this section must provide for a tribal marijuana tax that is at least one hundred percent of the state marijuana excise tax imposed under RCW 69.50.535 and state and local sales and use taxes on sales of marijuana. Marijuana agreements apply to sales in which tribes, tribal enterprises, or tribal member-owned businesses (i) deliver or cause delivery to be made to or receive delivery from a marijuana producer, processor, or retailer licensed under chapter 69.50 RCW or (ii) physically transfer possession of the marijuana from the seller to the buyer within Indian country.
(b) The tribe may allow an exemption from tax for sales to the tribe, tribal enterprises, tribal member-owned businesses, or tribal members[,] on marijuana grown, produced, or processed within its Indian country, or for activities to the extent they are exempt under state or federal law from the state marijuana excise tax imposed under RCW 69.50.535 or state and local sales or use taxes on sales of marijuana. Medical marijuana products used in the course of medical treatments by a clinic, hospital, or similar facility owned and operated by a federally recognized Indian tribe within its Indian country may be exempted from tax under the terms of an agreement entered into under this section.
(3) Any marijuana agreement relating to the production, processing, and sale of marijuana in Indian country, whether for recreational or medical purposes, must address the following issues:
(a) Preservation of public health and safety;
(b) Ensuring the security of production, processing, retail, and research facilities; and
(c) Cross-border commerce in marijuana.
(4) The governor may delegate the power to negotiate marijuana agreements to the *state liquor control board. In conducting such negotiations, the *state liquor control board must, when necessary, consult with the governor and/or the department of revenue. 
(5) The definitions in this subsection apply throughout this section unless the context clearly requires otherwise.
(a) "Indian country" has the same meaning as in RCW 82.24.010.
(b) "Indian tribe" or "tribe" means a federally recognized Indian tribe located within the geographical boundaries of the state of Washington.
(c) "Marijuana" means "marijuana," "marijuana concentrates," "marijuana-infused products," and "useable marijuana," as those terms are defined in RCW 69.50.101.

NOTES:

*Reviser's note: The "state liquor control board" was renamed the "state liquor and cannabis board" by 2015 c 70 § 3.
IntentFinding2015 c 207: "The legislature intends to further the government-to-government relationship between the state of Washington and federally recognized Indian tribes in the state of Washington by authorizing the governor to enter into agreements concerning the regulation of marijuana. Such agreements may include provisions pertaining to: The lawful commercial production, processing, sale, and possession of marijuana for both recreational and medical purposes; marijuana-related research activities; law enforcement, both criminal and civil; and taxation. The legislature finds that these agreements will facilitate and promote a cooperative and mutually beneficial relationship between the state and the tribes regarding matters relating to the legalization of marijuana, particularly in light of the fact that federal Indian law precludes the state from enforcing its civil regulatory laws in Indian country. Such cooperative agreements will enhance public health and safety, ensure a lawful and well-regulated marijuana market, encourage economic development, and provide fiscal benefits to both the tribes and the state." [ 2015 c 207 § 1.]



Commission on diversity, equity, and inclusionCreatedPowersAnnual reportMembership. (Effective if Referendum Measure No. 88 is approved at the November 2019 general election.)

(1) There is created the governor's commission on diversity, equity, and inclusion. The commission is responsible for planning, directing, monitoring, and enforcing each state agency's compliance with chapter 160, Laws of 2019. The commission may propose and oppose legislation and shall publish an annual report on the progress of all state agencies in achieving diversity, equity, and inclusion in public education, public employment, and public contracting.
(2) The governor's commission on diversity, equity, and inclusion shall be staffed and funded within the governor's biennial budget. The executive commission members shall be appointed by the governor and serve four-year terms:
(a) Lieutenant governor;
(b) Attorney general;
(c) Superintendent of public instruction;
(d) Commissioner of the department of employment security;
(e) Secretary of the department of transportation;
(f) Director of the department of enterprise services;
(g) Director of the office of minority and women's business enterprises;
(h) Director of the department of commerce;
(i) Director of the department of veterans affairs;
(j) Executive director of the human rights commission;
(k) Director of the office of financial management;
(l) Director of the department of labor and industries;
(m) Executive director of the governor's office of Indian affairs;
(n) Executive director of the Washington state women's commission;
(o) Executive director of the commission on African American affairs;
(p) Executive director of the commission on Asian Pacific American affairs;
(q) Executive director of the commission on Hispanic affairs;
(r) Chair of the governor's committee on disability issues and employment;
(s) Chair of the council of presidents;
(t) Chair of the board for community and technical colleges;
(u) Chair of the workforce training and education coordinating board;
(v) Executive director of the board of education;
(w) Chair of the board of Washington STEM;
(x) Chair, officer, or director of a state agency or nonprofit organization representing the legal immigrant and refugee community;
(y) Chair, officer, or director of a state agency or nonprofit organization representing the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer community;
(z) Any other agencies or community representatives the governor deems necessary to carry out the objectives of the commission.
(3)(a) The commission shall also consist of the following legislatively appointed members:
(i) Two state senators, one from each of the two largest caucuses, appointed by the president of the senate;
(ii) Two members of the state house of representatives, one from each of the two largest caucuses, appointed by the speaker of the house of representatives.
(b) Legislative members shall serve two-year terms, from the date of their appointment.
(4) Each commission member shall serve for the term of his or her appointment and until his or her successor is appointed. Any commission member listed in subsection (2) of this section, who serves by virtue of his or her office, shall be immediately replaced by his or her duly elected or appointed successor.
(5) A vacancy on the commission shall be filled within thirty days of the vacancy in the same manner as the original appointment.
[2019 c 160 § 5 (Initiative Measure No. 1000).]

NOTES:

Short titleIntentOffice of program research and senate committee servicesJoint memorandum and draft legislationSubject of Initiative Measure No. 1000 is diversity, equity, and inclusion2019 c 160 (Initiative Measure No. 1000): See notes following RCW 49.60.400.



Vapor product tax contractsRequirements. (Effective October 1, 2019.)

(1) The governor may enter into vapor product tax contracts concerning the sale of vapor products. All vapor product tax contracts must meet the requirements for vapor product tax contracts under this section.
(2) Vapor product tax contracts must be in regard to retail sales in which Indian retailers make delivery and physical transfer of possession of the vapor products from the seller to the buyer within Indian country, and are not in regard to transactions by non-Indian retailers. In addition, contracts may address the legal age of sale for vapor products pursuant to section 11, chapter 15, Laws of 2019.
(3) A vapor product tax contract with a tribe must provide for a tribal vapor product tax in lieu of all state vapor product taxes and state and local sales and use taxes on sales of vapor products in Indian country by Indian retailers. The tribe may allow an exemption for sales to tribal members.
(4) Vapor product tax contracts must provide that retailers must purchase vapor products only from:
(a) Wholesalers or manufacturers licensed to do business in the state of Washington;
(b) Out-of-state wholesalers or manufacturers who, although not licensed to do business in the state of Washington, agree to comply with the terms of the vapor product tax contract, are certified to the state as having so agreed, and do in fact so comply. However, the state may in its sole discretion exercise its administrative and enforcement powers over such wholesalers or manufacturers to the extent permitted by law;
(c) A tribal wholesaler that purchases only from a wholesaler or manufacturer described in (a), (b), or (d) of this subsection; and
(d) A tribal manufacturer.
(5) Vapor product tax contracts must be for renewable periods of no more than eight years.
(6) Vapor product tax contracts must include provisions for compliance, such as transport and notice requirements, inspection procedures, recordkeeping, and audit requirements.
(7) Tax revenue retained by a tribe must be used for essential government services. Use of tax revenue for subsidization of vapor products and food retailers is prohibited.
(8) The vapor product tax contract may include provisions to resolve disputes using a nonjudicial process, such as mediation.
(9) The governor may delegate the power to negotiate vapor product tax contracts to the department of revenue. The department of revenue must consult with the liquor and cannabis board during the negotiations.
(10) Information received by the state or open to state review under the terms of a contract is subject to the provisions of RCW 82.32.330.
(11) It is the intent of the legislature that the liquor and cannabis board and the department of revenue continue the division of duties and shared authority under chapter 82.25 RCW and therefore the liquor and cannabis board is responsible for enforcement activities that come under the terms of chapter 82.25 RCW.
(12) Each vapor product tax contract must include a procedure for notifying the other party that a violation has occurred, a procedure for establishing whether a violation has in fact occurred, an opportunity to correct such violation, and a provision providing for termination of the contract should the violation fail to be resolved through this process, such termination subject to mediation should the terms of the contract so allow. A contract must provide for termination of the contract if resolution of a dispute does not occur within twenty-four months from the time notification of a violation has occurred. Intervening violations do not extend this time period. In addition, the contract must include provisions delineating the respective roles and responsibilities of the tribe, the department of revenue, and the liquor and cannabis board.
(13) The definitions in this subsection apply throughout this section unless the context clearly requires otherwise.
(a) "Essential government services" means services such as tribal administration, public facilities, fire, police, public health, education, job services, sewer, water, environmental and land use, transportation, utility services, and economic development.
(b) "Indian country" has the same meaning as provided in RCW 82.24.010.
(c) "Indian retailer" or "retailer" means:
(i) A retailer wholly owned and operated by an Indian tribe;
(ii) A business wholly owned and operated by a tribal member and licensed by the tribe; or
(iii) A business owned and operated by the Indian person or persons in whose name the land is held in trust.
(d) "Indian tribe" or "tribe" means a federally recognized Indian tribe located within the geographical boundaries of the state of Washington.
(e) "Vapor products" has the same meaning as provided in RCW 82.25.005.

NOTES:

Conflict with federal requirementsEffective date2019 c 445: See RCW 82.25.900 and 82.25.901.
Automatic expiration date and tax preference performance statement exemption2019 c 445: See note following RCW 82.08.0318.



Vapor product tax contractsIndian tribes. (Effective October 1, 2019.)

(1) The governor is authorized to enter into vapor product tax contracts with federally recognized Indian tribes located within the geographical boundaries of the state of Washington. Each contract adopted under this section must provide that the tribal vapor product tax rate be one hundred percent of the state vapor product tax and state and local sales and use taxes. The tribal vapor product tax is in lieu of the state vapor product tax and state and local sales and use taxes, as provided in RCW 43.06.505(3).
(2) A vapor product tax contract under this section is subject to RCW 43.06.505 and is separate from a cigarette tax contract subject to RCW 43.06.455 or 43.06.466.

NOTES:

Conflict with federal requirementsEffective date2019 c 445: See RCW 82.25.900 and 82.25.901.
Automatic expiration date and tax preference performance statement exemption2019 c 445: See note following RCW 82.08.0318.



Vapor product tax contractsPuyallup tribe. (Effective October 1, 2019.)

(1) The governor may enter into a vapor product tax agreement with the Puyallup Tribe of Indians concerning the sale of vapor products, subject to the limitations in this section. The legislature intends to address the uniqueness of the Puyallup Indian reservation and its selling environment through pricing and compliance strategies, rather than through the imposition of equivalent taxes. The governor may delegate the authority to negotiate a vapor product tax agreement with the Puyallup Tribe to the department of revenue. The department of revenue must consult with the liquor and cannabis board during the negotiations. An agreement under this section is separate from an agreement under RCW 43.06.465.
(2) Any agreement must require the tribe to impose a tribal vapor product tax with a tax rate that is ninety percent of the state vapor product tax. This tribal tax is in lieu of the combined state and local sales and use taxes and the state vapor product tax, and as such these state taxes are not imposed during the term of the agreement on any transaction governed by the agreement. The tribal vapor product tax must increase or decrease at the time of any increase or decrease in the state vapor product tax so as to remain at a level that is ninety percent of the rate of the state vapor product tax.
(3) The agreement must include a provision requiring the tribe to transmit thirty percent of the tribal tax revenue on all vapor products sales to the state. The funds must be transmitted to the state treasurer on a quarterly basis for deposit by the state treasurer into the general fund. The remaining tribal tax revenue must be used for essential government services, as that term is defined in RCW 43.06.505.
(4) The agreement is limited to retail sales in which Indian retailers make delivery and physical transfer of possession of the vapor products from the seller to the buyer within Indian country, and are not in regard to transactions by non-Indian retailers. In addition, agreements may address the legal age of sale for vapor products pursuant to section 11, chapter 15, Laws of 2019.
(5)(a) The agreement must include a provision to price and sell the vapor products so that the retail selling price is not less than the price paid by the retailer for the vapor products.
(b) The tribal tax is in addition to the retail selling price.
(c) The agreement must include a provision to assure the price paid to the retailer includes the tribal tax.
(d) If the tribe is acting as a distributor to tribal retailers, the retail selling price must not be less than the price the tribe paid for such vapor products plus the tribal tax.
(6)(a) The agreement must include provisions regarding enforcement and compliance by the tribe in regard to enrolled tribal members who sell vapor products and must describe the individual and joint responsibilities of the tribe, the department of revenue, and the liquor and cannabis board.
(b) The agreement must include provisions for tax administration and compliance, such as transport and notice requirements, inspection procedures, recordkeeping, and audit requirements.
(c) The agreement must include provisions for sharing of information among the tribe, the department of revenue, and the liquor and cannabis board.
(7) The agreement must provide that retailers must purchase vapor products only from distributors or manufacturers licensed to do business in the state of Washington.
(8) The agreement must be for a renewable period of no more than eight years.
(9) The agreement must include provisions to resolve disputes using a nonjudicial process, such as mediation, and must include a dispute resolution protocol. The protocol must include a procedure for notifying the other party that a violation has occurred, a procedure for establishing whether a violation has in fact occurred, an opportunity to correct such violation, and a provision providing for termination of the agreement should the violation fail to be resolved through this process, such termination subject to mediation should the terms of the agreement so allow. An agreement must provide for termination of the agreement if resolution of a dispute does not occur within twenty-four months from the time notification of a violation has occurred. Intervening violations do not extend this time period.
(10) Information received by the state or open to state review under the terms of an agreement is subject to RCW 82.32.330.
(11) It is the intent of the legislature that the liquor and cannabis board and the department of revenue continue the division of duties and shared authority under chapter 82.25 RCW.
(12) The definitions in this subsection apply throughout this section unless the context clearly requires otherwise.
(a) "Indian country" has the same meaning as provided in RCW 82.24.010.
(b) "Indian retailer" or "retailer" means:
(i) A retailer wholly owned and operated by an Indian tribe; or
(ii) A business wholly owned and operated by an enrolled tribal member and licensed by the tribe.
(c) "Indian tribe" or "tribe" means the Puyallup Tribe of Indians, which is a federally recognized Indian tribe located within the geographical boundaries of the state of Washington.
(d) "Vapor products" has the same meaning as provided in RCW 82.25.005.

NOTES:

Conflict with federal requirementsEffective date2019 c 445: See RCW 82.25.900 and 82.25.901.
Automatic expiration date and tax preference performance statement exemption2019 c 445: See note following RCW 82.08.0318.