Chapter 28A.230 RCW

COMPULSORY COURSEWORK AND ACTIVITIES

Sections

28A.230.010Course content requirementsAccess to career and technical statewide equivalency coursesDuties of school district boards of directorsWaivers.
28A.230.015Access to career and technical course waiver.
28A.230.020Common school curriculum.
28A.230.030Students taught in English languageException.
28A.230.040Physical education in grades one through eight.
28A.230.050Physical education in high schools.
28A.230.055Physical education programsAnnual review.
28A.230.060Waiver of course of study in Washington's history and government.
28A.230.070AIDS education in public schoolsLimitationsProgram adoptionModel curriculaStudent's exclusion from participation.
28A.230.080Prevention of child abuse and neglectWritten policyParticipation in and establishment of programs.
28A.230.085Curriculum for prevention of sexual abuse on superintendent's web site.
28A.230.090High school graduation requirements or equivalenciesHigh school and beyond plansCareer and college ready graduation requirements and waiversReevaluation of graduation requirementsLanguage requirementsCredit for courses taken before attending high schoolPostsecondary credit equivalencies.
28A.230.091High school and beyond plansBest practices.
28A.230.094High school civics course.
28A.230.095Essential academic learning requirements and assessmentsVerification reports.
28A.230.097Career and technical high school course equivalencies.
28A.230.100Rules implementing course requirementsTemporary exemptions and special alterations from requirementsCompetency testing.
28A.230.120High school diplomasIssuanceOption to receive final transcriptsNotice.
28A.230.122International baccalaureate diplomas.
28A.230.125Standardized high school transcripts.
28A.230.130Program to help students meet minimum entrance requirements at baccalaureate-granting institutions or to pursue career or other opportunitiesHigh school course offerings for postsecondary credit.
28A.230.140United States flagProcurement, display, exercisesNational anthem.
28A.230.150Temperance and Good Citizenship DayAids in programmingVoter registrationReport.
28A.230.158Disability history monthActivities.
28A.230.160Educational activities in observance of Veterans' Day.
28A.230.170Study of constitutions compulsoryRules.
28A.230.178Civil rights education.
28A.230.179Cardiopulmonary resuscitation instruction.
28A.230.180Access to campus and student information directories by official recruiting representativesInforming students of educational and career opportunities.
28A.230.195Test or assessment scoresAdjustments to instructional practicesNotification to parents.
28A.230.215High school and beyond plansElectronic platform.
28A.230.250Coordination of procedures and content of assessments.
28A.230.265Condensed compliance reportsSecond-class districts.
28A.230.300Computer science.
28A.230.310Financial aid advising day.

NOTES:

AIDS prevention education: Chapter 70.24 RCW.


Course content requirementsAccess to career and technical statewide equivalency coursesDuties of school district boards of directorsWaivers.

(1) School district boards of directors shall identify and offer courses with content that meet or exceed: (a) The basic education skills identified in RCW 28A.150.210; (b) the graduation requirements under RCW 28A.230.090; (c) the courses required to meet the minimum college entrance requirements under RCW 28A.230.130; and (d) the course options for career development under RCW 28A.230.130. Such courses may be applied or theoretical, academic, or vocational.
(2) Until September 1, 2021, school district boards of directors must provide high school students with the opportunity to access at least one career and technical education course that is considered a statewide equivalency course as determined by the office of the superintendent of public instruction under RCW 28A.700.070.
(3) On and after September 1, 2021, any statewide equivalency course offered by a school district or accessed at a skill center must be offered for academic credit.
(4) Students may access statewide equivalency courses at high schools, interdistrict cooperatives, skill centers or branch or satellite skill centers, or through online learning or applicable running start vocational courses.
(5) On and after January 1, 2019, school district boards of directors of school districts with fewer than two thousand students may apply to the superintendent of public instruction for a waiver from the provisions of subsections (2) and (3) of this section under RCW 28A.230.015.

NOTES:

FindingIntent2018 c 177: See note following RCW 28A.305.905.
Effective date2014 c 217 §§ 103 and 104: "Sections 103 and 104 of this act take effect September 1, 2015." [ 2014 c 217 § 208.]
FindingIntent2014 c 217: See note following RCW 28A.150.220.
Severability1984 c 278: See note following RCW 28A.185.010.



Access to career and technical course waiver.

(1) The superintendent of public instruction may grant a waiver from the provisions of RCW 28A.230.010(2) based on an application from a board of directors of a school district with fewer than two thousand students.
(2) The state board of education may adopt rules establishing the criteria to evaluate the need for a waiver or waivers under this section.

NOTES:

Effective dates2018 c 177 §§ 201, 202, 501-504, 507, and 701: See note following RCW 28A.150.222.
FindingIntent2018 c 177: See note following RCW 28A.305.905.



Common school curriculum.

All common schools shall give instruction in reading, handwriting, orthography, written and mental arithmetic, geography, the history of the United States, English grammar, physiology and hygiene with special reference to the effects of alcohol and drug abuse on the human system, science with special reference to the environment, and such other studies as may be prescribed by rule of the superintendent of public instruction. All teachers shall stress the importance of the cultivation of manners, the fundamental principles of honesty, honor, industry and economy, the minimum requisites for good health including the beneficial effect of physical exercise and methods to prevent exposure to and transmission of sexually transmitted diseases, and the worth of kindness to all living creatures and the land. The prevention of child abuse may be offered as part of the curriculum in the common schools.

NOTES:

FindingsPurposePart headings not law2006 c 263: See notes following RCW 28A.150.230.
Effective date1988 c 206 §§ 402, 403: See note following RCW 28A.230.070.
Districts to develop programs and establish programs regarding child abuse and neglect prevention: RCW 28A.230.080.
Sexual abuse of students, child abuse, and neglectCoordinated prevention program: RCW 28A.300.160.



Students taught in English languageException.

All students in the common schools of the state of Washington shall be taught in the English language: PROVIDED, That nothing in this section shall preclude the teaching of students in a language other than English when such instruction will aid the educational advancement of the student.
[ 1969 c 71 § 4. Formerly RCW 28A.05.015.]



Physical education in grades one through eight.

Every pupil attending grades one through eight of the public schools shall receive instruction in physical education as prescribed by rule of the superintendent of public instruction: PROVIDED, That individual pupils or students may be excused on account of physical disability, religious belief, or participation in directed athletics.

NOTES:

FindingsPurposePart headings not law2006 c 263: See notes following RCW 28A.150.230.



Physical education in high schools.

All high schools of the state shall emphasize the work of physical education, and carry into effect all physical education requirements established by rule of the superintendent of public instruction: PROVIDED, That individual students may be excused from participating in physical education otherwise required under this section on account of physical disability, employment, or religious belief, or because of participation in directed athletics or military science and tactics or for other good cause.
[ 2006 c 263 § 416; 1985 c 384 § 3; 1984 c 52 § 2; 1969 ex.s. c 223 § 28A.05.040. Prior: 1963 c 235 § 1, part; prior: (i) 1923 c 78 § 1, part; 1919 c 89 § 2, part; RRS § 4683, part. (ii) 1919 c 89 § 5, part; RRS § 4686, part. Formerly RCW 28A.05.040, 28.05.040, part.]

NOTES:

FindingsPurposePart headings not law2006 c 263: See notes following RCW 28A.150.230.



Physical education programsAnnual review.

(1) Beginning in the 2018-19 school year, all school districts must conduct an annual review of their physical education programs that includes:
(a) The number of individual students completing a physical education class during the school year;
(b) The average number of minutes per week of physical education received by students in grades one through eight, expressed in appropriate reporting ranges;
(c) The number of students granted waivers from physical education requirements;
(d) An indication of whether all physical education classes are taught by instructors who possess a valid health and fitness endorsement;
(e) The physical education class sizes, expressed in appropriate reporting ranges;
(f) The frequency with which physical education is provided to students;
(g) An indication of whether there is sufficient dedicated gym space and sheltered areas to support the minimum amount of physical activity required of students by law or agency rule;
(h) An indication of whether the physical education curriculum of the district addresses the Washington state K-12 learning standards;
(i) An indication of whether, as a matter of policy or procedure, the district routinely modifies and adapts its physical education curriculum for students with disabilities; and
(j) An indication of whether the district routinely excludes students from physical education classes for disciplinary reasons.
(2) The results of the review required by this section must be submitted by the school district to the district's wellness committee and to the office of the superintendent of public instruction. The office of the superintendent of public instruction, upon receipt of the review data, must aggregate and analyze the data, summarize the information provided by each district, and post the summarized information, by district, on its web site.
(3) In fulfilling the requirements of this section, the K-12 data governance group established under RCW 28A.300.507 shall develop the data protocols and guidance for school districts in the collection of data to provide a clearer understanding of physical education instructional minutes and certification.



Waiver of course of study in Washington's history and government.

Students in the twelfth grade who have not completed a course of study in Washington's history and state government because of previous residence outside the state may have the requirement in RCW 28A.230.090 waived by their principal.
[ 1991 c 116 § 7; 1969 ex.s. c 57 § 2; 1969 ex.s. c 223 § 28A.05.050. Prior: 1967 c 64 § 1, part; 1963 c 31 § 1, part; 1961 c 47 § 2, part; 1941 c 203 § 1, part; Rem. Supp. 1941 § 4898-3, part. Formerly RCW 28A.05.050, 28.05.050.]



AIDS education in public schoolsLimitationsProgram adoptionModel curriculaStudent's exclusion from participation.

(1) The life-threatening dangers of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and its prevention shall be taught in the public schools of this state. AIDS prevention education shall be limited to the discussion of the life-threatening dangers of the disease, its spread, and prevention. Students shall receive such education at least once each school year beginning no later than the fifth grade.
(2) Each district board of directors shall adopt an AIDS prevention education program which is developed in consultation with teachers, administrators, parents, and other community members including, but not limited to, persons from medical, public health, and mental health organizations and agencies so long as the curricula and materials developed for use in the AIDS education program either (a) are the model curricula and resources under subsection (3) of this section, or (b) are developed by the school district and approved for medical accuracy by the office on AIDS established in *RCW 70.24.250. If a district elects to use curricula developed by the school district, the district shall submit to the office on AIDS a copy of its curricula and an affidavit of medical accuracy stating that the material in the district-developed curricula has been compared to the model curricula for medical accuracy and that in the opinion of the district the district-developed materials are medically accurate. Upon submission of the affidavit and curricula, the district may use these materials until the approval procedure to be conducted by the office of AIDS has been completed.
(3) Model curricula and other resources available from the superintendent of public instruction may be reviewed by the school district board of directors, in addition to materials designed locally, in developing the district's AIDS education program. The model curricula shall be reviewed for medical accuracy by the office on AIDS established in *RCW 70.24.250 within the department of social and health services.
(4) Each school district shall, at least one month before teaching AIDS prevention education in any classroom, conduct at least one presentation during weekend and evening hours for the parents and guardians of students concerning the curricula and materials that will be used for such education. The parents and guardians shall be notified by the school district of the presentation and that the curricula and materials are available for inspection. No student may be required to participate in AIDS prevention education if the student's parent or guardian, having attended one of the district presentations, objects in writing to the participation.
(5) The office of the superintendent of public instruction with the assistance of the office on AIDS shall update AIDS education curriculum material as newly discovered medical facts make it necessary.
(6) The curriculum for AIDS prevention education shall be designed to teach students which behaviors place a person dangerously at risk of infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and methods to avoid such risk including, at least:
(a) The dangers of drug abuse, especially that involving the use of hypodermic needles; and
(b) The dangers of sexual intercourse, with or without condoms.
(7) The program of AIDS prevention education shall stress the life-threatening dangers of contracting AIDS and shall stress that abstinence from sexual activity is the only certain means for the prevention of the spread or contraction of the AIDS virus through sexual contact. It shall also teach that condoms and other artificial means of birth control are not a certain means of preventing the spread of the AIDS virus and reliance on condoms puts a person at risk for exposure to the disease.

NOTES:

*Reviser's note: RCW 70.24.250 was repealed by 2020 c 76 § 22.
Effective date1988 c 206 §§ 402 and 403: "Sections 402 and 403 of this act shall take effect July 1, 1988." [ 1988 c 206 § 404.]



Prevention of child abuse and neglectWritten policyParticipation in and establishment of programs.

(1) Every school district board of directors shall develop a written policy regarding the district's role and responsibility relating to the prevention of child abuse and neglect.
(2) Every school district shall, within the resources available to it: (a) Participate in the primary prevention program established under RCW 28A.300.160; (b) develop and implement its own child abuse and neglect education and prevention program; or (c) continue with an existing local child abuse and neglect education and prevention program.

NOTES:

Intent1987 c 489: See note following RCW 28A.300.150.



Curriculum for prevention of sexual abuse on superintendent's web site.

Subject to the availability of amounts appropriated for this specific purpose, the office of the superintendent of public instruction shall make the curriculum included under RCW 28A.300.160(1)(b) available on its web site.

NOTES:

FindingsIntent2018 c 64: See note following RCW 28A.300.160.



High school graduation requirements or equivalenciesHigh school and beyond plansCareer and college ready graduation requirements and waiversReevaluation of graduation requirementsLanguage requirementsCredit for courses taken before attending high schoolPostsecondary credit equivalencies.

(1) The state board of education shall establish high school graduation requirements or equivalencies for students, except as provided in RCW 28A.230.122 and 28A.655.250 and except those equivalencies established by local high schools or school districts under RCW 28A.230.097. The purpose of a high school diploma is to declare that a student is ready for success in postsecondary education, gainful employment, and citizenship, and is equipped with the skills to be a lifelong learner.
(a) Any course in Washington state history and government used to fulfill high school graduation requirements shall consider including information on the culture, history, and government of the American Indian peoples who were the first inhabitants of the state.
(b) Except as provided otherwise in this subsection, the certificate of academic achievement requirements under RCW 28A.655.061 or the certificate of individual achievement requirements under RCW 28A.155.045 are required for graduation from a public high school but are not the only requirements for graduation. The requirement to earn a certificate of academic achievement to qualify for graduation from a public high school concludes with the graduating class of 2019. The obligation of qualifying students to earn a certificate of individual achievement as a prerequisite for graduation from a public high school concludes with the graduating class of 2021.
(c)(i) Each student must have a high school and beyond plan to guide the student's high school experience and inform course taking that is aligned with the student's goals for education or training and career after high school.
(ii)(A) A high school and beyond plan must be initiated for each student during the seventh or eighth grade. In preparation for initiating that plan, each student must first be administered a career interest and skills inventory.
(B) For students with an individualized education program, the high school and beyond plan must be developed in alignment with their individualized education program. The high school and beyond plan must be developed in a similar manner and with similar school personnel as for all other students.
(iii)(A) The high school and beyond plan must be updated to reflect high school assessment results in RCW 28A.655.070(3)(b) and to review transcripts, assess progress toward identified goals, and revised as necessary for changing interests, goals, and needs. The plan must identify available interventions and academic support, courses, or both, that are designed for students who are not on track to graduate, to enable them to fulfill high school graduation requirements. Each student's high school and beyond plan must be updated to inform junior year course taking.
(B) For students with an individualized education program, the high school and beyond plan must be updated in alignment with their school to postschool transition plan. The high school and beyond plan must be updated in a similar manner and with similar school personnel as for all other students.
(iv) School districts are encouraged to involve parents and guardians in the process of developing and updating the high school and beyond plan, and the plan must be provided to the students' parents or guardians in their native language if that language is one of the two most frequently spoken non-English languages of students in the district. Nothing in this subsection (1)(c)(iv) prevents districts from providing high school and beyond plans to parents and guardians in additional languages that are not required by this subsection.
(v) All high school and beyond plans must, at a minimum, include the following elements:
(A) Identification of career goals, aided by a skills and interest assessment;
(B) Identification of educational goals;
(C) Identification of dual credit programs and the opportunities they create for students, including eligibility for automatic enrollment in advanced classes under RCW 28A.320.195, career and technical education programs, running start programs, AP courses, international baccalaureate programs, and college in the high school programs;
(D) Information about the college bound scholarship program established in chapter 28B.118 RCW;
(E) A four-year plan for course taking that:
(I) Includes information about options for satisfying state and local graduation requirements;
(II) Satisfies state and local graduation requirements;
(III) Aligns with the student's secondary and postsecondary goals, which can include education, training, and career;
(IV) Identifies course sequences to inform academic acceleration, as described in RCW 28A.320.195 that include dual credit courses or programs and are aligned with the student's goals; and
(V) Includes information about the college bound scholarship program, the Washington college grant, and other scholarship opportunities;
(F) Evidence that the student has received the following information on federal and state financial aid programs that help pay for the costs of a postsecondary program:
(I) Information about the documentation necessary for completing the applications; application timeliness and submission deadlines; the importance of submitting applications early; information specific to students who are or have been in foster care; information specific to students who are, or are at risk of being, homeless; information specific to students whose family member or guardians will be required to provide financial and tax information necessary to complete applications; and
(II) Opportunities to participate in sessions that assist students and, when necessary, their family members or guardians, fill out financial aid applications; and
(G) By the end of the twelfth grade, a current resume or activity log that provides a written compilation of the student's education, any work experience, and any community service and how the school district has recognized the community service pursuant to RCW 28A.320.193.
(d) Any decision on whether a student has met the state board's high school graduation requirements for a high school and beyond plan shall remain at the local level. Effective with the graduating class of 2015, the state board of education may not establish a requirement for students to complete a culminating project for graduation. A district may establish additional, local requirements for a high school and beyond plan to serve the needs and interests of its students and the purposes of this section.
(e)(i) The state board of education shall adopt rules to implement the career and college ready graduation requirement proposal adopted under board resolution on November 10, 2010, and revised on January 9, 2014, to take effect beginning with the graduating class of 2019 or as otherwise provided in this subsection (1)(e). The rules must include authorization for a school district to waive up to two credits for individual students based on a student's circumstances, provided that none of the waived credits are identified as mandatory core credits by the state board of education. School districts must adhere to written policies authorizing the waivers that must be adopted by each board of directors of a school district that grants diplomas. The rules must also provide that the content of the third credit of mathematics and the content of the third credit of science may be chosen by the student based on the student's interests and high school and beyond plan with agreement of the student's parent or guardian or agreement of the school counselor or principal.
(ii) School districts may apply to the state board of education for a waiver to implement the career and college ready graduation requirement proposal beginning with the graduating class of 2020 or 2021 instead of the graduating class of 2019. In the application, a school district must describe why the waiver is being requested, the specific impediments preventing timely implementation, and efforts that will be taken to achieve implementation with the graduating class proposed under the waiver. The state board of education shall grant a waiver under this subsection (1)(e) to an applying school district at the next subsequent meeting of the board after receiving an application.
(iii) A school district must update the high school and beyond plans for each student who has not earned a score of level 3 or level 4 on the middle school mathematics assessment identified in RCW 28A.655.070 by ninth grade, to ensure that the student takes a mathematics course in both ninth and tenth grades. This course may include career and technical education equivalencies in mathematics adopted pursuant to RCW 28A.230.097.
(2)(a) In recognition of the statutory authority of the state board of education to establish and enforce minimum high school graduation requirements, the state board shall periodically reevaluate the graduation requirements and shall report such findings to the legislature in a timely manner as determined by the state board.
(b) The state board shall reevaluate the graduation requirements for students enrolled in vocationally intensive and rigorous career and technical education programs, particularly those programs that lead to a certificate or credential that is state or nationally recognized. The purpose of the evaluation is to ensure that students enrolled in these programs have sufficient opportunity to earn a certificate of academic achievement, complete the program and earn the program's certificate or credential, and complete other state and local graduation requirements.
(c) The state board shall forward any proposed changes to the high school graduation requirements to the education committees of the legislature for review. The legislature shall have the opportunity to act during a regular legislative session before the changes are adopted through administrative rule by the state board. Changes that have a fiscal impact on school districts, as identified by a fiscal analysis prepared by the office of the superintendent of public instruction, shall take effect only if formally authorized and funded by the legislature through the omnibus appropriations act or other enacted legislation.
(3) Pursuant to any requirement for instruction in languages other than English established by the state board of education or a local school district, or both, for purposes of high school graduation, students who receive instruction in American sign language or one or more American Indian languages shall be considered to have satisfied the state or local school district graduation requirement for instruction in one or more languages other than English.
(4) Unless requested otherwise by the student and the student's family, a student who has completed high school courses before attending high school shall be given high school credit which shall be applied to fulfilling high school graduation requirements if:
(a) The course was taken with high school students, if the academic level of the course exceeds the requirements for seventh and eighth grade classes, and the student has successfully passed by completing the same course requirements and examinations as the high school students enrolled in the class; or
(b) The academic level of the course exceeds the requirements for seventh and eighth grade classes and the course would qualify for high school credit, because the course is similar or equivalent to a course offered at a high school in the district as determined by the school district board of directors.
(5) Students who have taken and successfully completed high school courses under the circumstances in subsection (4) of this section shall not be required to take an additional competency examination or perform any other additional assignment to receive credit.
(6) At the college or university level, five quarter or three semester hours equals one high school credit.

NOTES:

IntentConflict with federal requirements2020 c 307: See notes following RCW 28B.77.290.
Expiration date2020 c 7 § 11: "Section 11 of this act expires July 31, 2020." [ 2020 c 7 § 12.]
Conflict with federal requirementsEffective date2020 c 7: See notes following RCW 50.16.100.
Intent2019 c 252: See note following RCW 28A.655.250.
Effective date2017 3rd sp.s. c 31: See note following RCW 28A.655.061.
FindingIntent2014 c 217: See note following RCW 28A.150.220.
Intent2009 c 548: See RCW 28A.150.1981.
Finding2009 c 548: See note following RCW 28A.410.270.
IntentFinding2009 c 548: See note following RCW 28A.305.130.
Finding2009 c 223: "The legislature finds that although the United States has long exemplified democratic practice to the rest of the world, we ought not to neglect it at home. Two-thirds of our nation's twelfth graders scored below proficient on the last national civics assessment, and fewer than ten percent could list two ways that a democracy benefits from citizen participation. A healthy democracy depends on the participation of citizens. But participation is learned behavior, and in recent years civic learning has been pushed aside. Preparation for citizenship is as important as preparation for college and a career, and should take its place as a requirement for receiving a high school diploma." [ 2009 c 223 § 1.]
FindingIntent2006 c 114: See note following RCW 28A.230.097.
IntentFindings2005 c 205: See note following RCW 28A.320.170.
Part headings and captions not lawSeverabilityEffective date2004 c 19: See notes following RCW 28A.655.061.
Intent1997 c 222: "In 1994, the legislature directed the higher education board and the state board of education to convene a task force to examine and provide recommendations on establishing credit equivalencies. In November 1994, the task force recommended unanimously that the state board of education maintain the definition of five quarter or three semester college credits as equivalent to one high school credit. Therefore, the legislature intends to adopt the recommendations of the task force." [ 1997 c 222 § 1.]
FindingsPart headingsSeverability1992 c 141: See notes following RCW 28A.410.040.
FindingSeverability1990 1st ex.s. c 9: See notes following RCW 28A.225.220.
Severability1984 c 278: See note following RCW 28A.185.010.



High school and beyond plansBest practices.

Subject to the availability of amounts appropriated for this specific purpose, the office of the superintendent of public instruction shall work with school districts, including teachers, principals, and school counselors, educational service districts, the Washington state school directors' association, institutions of higher education as defined in RCW 28B.10.016, students, and parents and guardians to identify best practices for high school and beyond plans that districts and schools may employ when complying with high school and beyond plan requirements adopted in accordance with RCW 28A.230.090. The identified best practices, which must consider differences in enrollment and other factors that distinguish districts from one another, must be posted on the web site of the office of the superintendent of public instruction by September 1, 2019, and may be revised periodically as necessary.



High school civics course.

(1)(a) Beginning with or before the 2020-21 school year, each school district that operates a high school must provide a mandatory one-half credit stand-alone course in civics for each high school student. Except as provided by (c) of this subsection, civics content and instruction embedded in other social studies courses do not satisfy the requirements of this subsection.
(b) Credit awarded to students who complete the civics course must be applied to course credit requirements in social studies that are required for high school graduation.
(c) Civics content and instruction required by this section may be embedded in social studies courses that offer students the opportunity to earn both high school and postsecondary credit.
(2) The content of the civics course must include, but is not limited to:
(a) Federal, state, tribal, and local government organization and procedures;
(b) Rights and responsibilities of citizens addressed in the Washington state and United States Constitutions;
(c) Current issues addressed at each level of government;
(d) Electoral issues, including elections, ballot measures, initiatives, and referenda;
(e) The study and completion of the civics component of the federally administered naturalization test required of persons seeking to become naturalized United States citizens; and
(f) The importance in a free society of living the basic values and character traits specified in RCW 28A.150.211.
(3) By September 1, 2020, the office of the superintendent of public instruction, in collaboration with the Washington state association of county auditors and a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization engaged in voter outreach and increasing voter participation, shall identify and make available civics materials and resources for use in courses under this section. The materials and resources must be posted on the office of the superintendent of public instruction's web site.

NOTES:

Short titleFindings2020 c 208: See notes following RCW 29A.08.210.
FindingIntent2018 c 127: "The legislature finds that effective civics education teaches students how to be active, informed, and engaged citizens. The legislature recognizes that RCW 28A.150.210 identifies civics as one component of a basic education and that one-half credit in civics is required for high school graduation. The required civics content, however, may be embedded in another social studies course.
Civics requirements are meant to ensure that every student receives a high-quality civics education from kindergarten through twelfth grade. The legislature also recognizes, however, that two factors limit the effectiveness of civics education.
First, when the one-half civics credit is embedded in other courses rather than taught in a stand-alone civics course, the required content is easily diluted or ignored altogether. Pressure to emphasize other areas of the curriculum can relegate civics education to a lesser role.
Second, professional development opportunities for teachers in civics education are rare. In many districts, due to limited budgets and competing demands for funding, opportunities for teachers to deepen instructional and curricular practices in civics do not exist.
The legislature, therefore, intends to: Require school districts to provide a mandatory stand-alone civics course for all high school students; and support the development of an in-depth and interactive teacher professional development program to improve the ability of teachers throughout the state to provide students with an effective civics education from kindergarten through twelfth grade. This expanded civics education program seeks to ensure that students have basic knowledge about national, state, tribal, and local governments, and that they develop the skills and dispositions needed to become informed and engaged citizens." [ 2018 c 127 § 1.]



Essential academic learning requirements and assessmentsVerification reports.

(1) By the end of the 2008-09 school year, school districts shall have in place in elementary schools, middle schools, and high schools assessments or other strategies chosen by the district to assure that students have an opportunity to learn the essential academic learning requirements in social studies, the arts, and health and fitness. Social studies includes history, geography, civics, economics, and social studies skills. Health and fitness includes, but is not limited to, mental health and suicide prevention education. Beginning with the 2008-09 school year, school districts shall annually submit an implementation verification report to the office of the superintendent of public instruction. The office of the superintendent of public instruction may not require school districts to use a classroom-based assessment in social studies, the arts, and health and fitness to meet the requirements of this section and shall clearly communicate to districts their option to use other strategies chosen by the district.
(2) Beginning with the 2008-09 school year, school districts shall require students in the seventh or eighth grade, and the eleventh or twelfth grade to each complete at least one classroom-based assessment in civics. Beginning with the 2010-11 school year, school districts shall require students in the fourth or fifth grade to complete at least one classroom-based assessment in civics. The civics assessment may be selected from a list of classroom-based assessments approved by the office of the superintendent of public instruction. Beginning with the 2008-09 school year, school districts shall annually submit implementation verification reports to the office of the superintendent of public instruction documenting the use of the classroom-based assessments in civics.
(3) Verification reports shall require school districts to report only the information necessary to comply with this section.

NOTES:

Effective date2011 c 185 § 5: "Section 5 of this act takes effect July 1, 2012." [ 2011 c 185 § 6.]
Finding2011 c 185: See note following RCW 28A.300.2851.
Findings2006 c 113: "The legislature finds that instruction in social studies, arts, health, and fitness is important to ensure a well-rounded and complete education. In particular, the civic mission of schools is strengthened and enhanced by comprehensive civics education and assessments. The legislature finds that effective and accountable democratic government depends upon an informed and engaged citizenry, and therefore, students should learn their rights and responsibilities as citizens, where those rights and responsibilities come from, and how to exercise them." [ 2006 c 113 § 1.]
Part headings and captions not lawSeverabilityEffective date2004 c 19: See notes following RCW 28A.655.061.



Career and technical high school course equivalencies.

(1) Each high school or school district board of directors shall adopt course equivalencies for career and technical high school courses offered to students in high schools and skill centers. A career and technical course equivalency may be for whole or partial credit. Each school district board of directors shall develop a course equivalency approval procedure. Boards of directors must approve AP computer science courses as equivalent to high school mathematics or science, and must denote on a student's transcript that AP computer science qualifies as a math-based quantitative course for students who take the course in their senior year.
(2) Until September 1, 2021, a school district board of directors must, at a minimum, grant academic course equivalency for at least one statewide equivalency high school career and technical course from the list of courses approved by the superintendent of public instruction under RCW 28A.700.070.
(3)(a) If the list of courses is revised after the 2015-16 school year, the school district board of directors must grant academic course equivalency based on the revised list beginning with the school year immediately following the revision.
(b) Each high school or school district board of directors may additionally adopt local course equivalencies for career and technical education courses that are not on the list of courses approved by the superintendent of public instruction under RCW 28A.700.070 as local equivalency courses in support of RCW 28A.700.070.
(4) On and after September 1, 2021, any statewide equivalency course offered by a school district or accessed at a skill center must be offered for academic credit.
(5) Career and technical courses determined to be equivalent to academic core courses, in full or in part, by the high school or school district shall be accepted as meeting core requirements, including graduation requirements, if the courses are recorded on the student's transcript using the equivalent academic high school department designation and title. Full or partial credit shall be recorded as appropriate. The high school or school district shall also issue and keep record of course completion certificates that demonstrate that the career and technical courses were successfully completed as needed for industry certification, college credit, or preapprenticeship, as applicable. The certificate shall be part of the student's high school and beyond plan. The office of the superintendent of public instruction shall develop and make available electronic samples of certificates of course completion.

NOTES:

FindingIntent2018 c 177: See note following RCW 28A.305.905.
FindingIntent2014 c 217: See note following RCW 28A.150.220.
FindingsIntent2013 c 241: "(1) The legislature finds that:
(a) Through such initiatives as grants for high-demand career and technical education programs and participation in the Microsoft IT academy, the state has previously supported K-12 computer science education;
(b) However, even though there were nearly sixty-five thousand student enrollments in high school computer science courses in the 2011-12 school year, more than half of those enrollments were in beginning or exploratory courses. Fewer than twelve hundred students enrolled in AP computer science courses;
(c) National studies of K-12 computer science education indicate that, in part because computer science is not treated as an academic subject, students may not perceive advanced computer science as relevant to their future academic or career success;
(d) Public institutions of higher education have expanded capacity to grant certificates and degrees in computer science and related fields in response to high employer demand and high student demand. Additional expansion and improvement will be dependent on new resources, updated equipment, and the availability of expert faculty;
(e) Information technology job vacancies exist at all levels of training and education and across all industries that are critical to Washington's economy; and
(f) Strategies are needed to support additional opportunities for Washington students to have careers in the innovative, technology-based or technology-enhanced industries located in our state.
(2) Therefore the legislature intends to take additional steps to improve and expand access to computer science education, particularly in advanced courses that could prepare students for careers in the field." [ 2013 c 241 § 1.]
FindingsIntent2008 c 170: See RCW 28A.700.005.
FindingIntent2006 c 114: "(1) The legislature finds that Washington's performance-based education system should seek to provide fundamental academic knowledge and skills for all students, and to provide the opportunity for students to acquire knowledge and skills likely to contribute to their own economic well-being and that of their families and communities.
(2) The legislature recognizes that career and technical options are available for students.
(3) High schools or school districts should take advantage of their opportunity to offer course credits, including credits toward graduation requirements, for knowledge and skills in fundamental academic content areas that students gain in career and technical education courses.
(4) Therefore the legislature intends to create a rigorous and high quality career and technical high school alternative assessment that assures students meet state standards, and also reflects nationally recognized standards for the knowledge and skills needed to pursue employment and careers in technical fields." [ 2006 c 114 § 1.]



Rules implementing course requirementsTemporary exemptions and special alterations from requirementsCompetency testing.

(1) The superintendent of public instruction, in consultation with the student achievement council, the state board for community and technical colleges, and the workforce training and education coordinating board, shall adopt rules pursuant to chapter 34.05 RCW, to implement the course requirements set forth in RCW 28A.230.090. The rules shall include, as the superintendent deems necessary, granting equivalencies for and temporary exemptions from the course requirements in RCW 28A.230.090 and special alterations of the course requirements in RCW 28A.230.090. In developing such rules the superintendent shall recognize the relevance of vocational and applied courses and allow such courses to fulfill in whole or in part the courses required for graduation in RCW 28A.230.090, as determined by the high school or school district in accordance with RCW 28A.230.097.
(2) The rules created under subsection (1) of this section must include provisions for:
(a) Competency testing in lieu of such courses required for graduation in RCW 28A.230.090;
(b) Competency testing in lieu of electives, including computer science electives created under RCW 28A.230.300, provided applicable state learning standards and equivalency requirements are met; and
(c) Demonstration of specific skill proficiency or understanding of concepts through work or experience.

NOTES:

Findings2019 c 180: See note following RCW 28A.230.300.
Effective date2012 c 229 §§ 101, 117, 401, 402, 501 through 594, 601 through 609, 701 through 708, 801 through 821, 902, and 904: See note following RCW 28B.77.005.
FindingsPurposePart headings not law2006 c 263: See notes following RCW 28A.150.230.
FindingIntent2006 c 114: See note following RCW 28A.230.097.



High school diplomasIssuanceOption to receive final transcriptsNotice.

(1) School districts shall issue diplomas to students signifying graduation from high school upon the students' satisfactory completion of all local and state graduation requirements. Districts shall grant students the option of receiving a final transcript in addition to the regular diploma.
(2) School districts or schools of attendance shall establish policies and procedures to notify senior students of the transcript option and shall direct students to indicate their decisions in a timely manner. School districts shall make appropriate provisions to assure that students who choose to receive a copy of their final transcript shall receive such transcript after graduation.
(3)(a) A school district may issue a high school diploma to a person who:
(i) Is an honorably discharged member of the armed forces of the United States; and
(ii) Left high school before graduation to serve in World War II, the Korean conflict, or the Vietnam era as defined in RCW 41.04.005.
(b) A school district may issue a diploma to or on behalf of a person otherwise eligible under (a) of this subsection notwithstanding the fact that the person holds a high school equivalency certification or is deceased.
(c) The superintendent of public instruction shall adopt a form for a diploma application to be used by a veteran or a person acting on behalf of a deceased veteran under this subsection (3). The superintendent of public instruction shall specify what constitutes acceptable evidence of eligibility for a diploma.

NOTES:

Effective date2003 c 234: "This act is necessary for the immediate preservation of the public peace, health, or safety, or support of the state government and its existing public institutions, and takes effect immediately [May 12, 2003]." [ 2003 c 234 § 2.]
High school transcripts: RCW 28A.230.125.



International baccalaureate diplomas.

(1) A student who fulfills the requirements specified in subsection (3) of this section toward completion of an international baccalaureate diploma programme is considered to have met the requirements of the graduation pathway option established in RCW 28A.655.250(1)(b)(iv) and to have satisfied state minimum requirements for graduation from a public high school, except that the provisions of RCW 28A.230.170 regarding study of the United States Constitution and the Washington state Constitution apply to students under this section.
(2) School districts may require students under this section to complete local graduation requirements that are in addition to state minimum requirements before issuing a high school diploma under RCW 28A.230.120. However, school districts are encouraged to waive local requirements as necessary to encourage students to pursue an international baccalaureate diploma.
(3) To receive a high school diploma under this section, a student must complete and pass all required international baccalaureate diploma programme courses as scored at the local level; pass all internal assessments as scored at the local level; successfully complete all required projects and products as scored at the local level; and complete the final examinations administered by the international baccalaureate organization in each of the required subjects under the diploma programme.

NOTES:

Intent2019 c 252: See note following RCW 28A.655.250.



Standardized high school transcripts.

(1) The superintendent of public instruction, in consultation with the four-year institutions as defined in RCW 28B.76.020, the state board for community and technical colleges, and the workforce training and education coordinating board, shall develop for use by all public school districts a standardized high school transcript. The superintendent shall establish clear definitions for the terms "credits" and "hours" so that school programs operating on the quarter, semester, or trimester system can be compared.
(2) The standardized high school transcript may include a notation of whether the student has earned the Washington state seal of biliteracy established under RCW 28A.300.575.

NOTES:

Intent2019 c 252: See note following RCW 28A.655.250.
FindingsIntent2014 c 102: See note following RCW 28A.300.575.
Effective date2011 1st sp.s. c 11 §§ 101-103, 106-202, 204-244, and 301: See note following RCW 28B.76.020.
Intent2011 1st sp.s. c 11: See note following RCW 28B.76.020.
FindingsPurposePart headings not law2006 c 263: See notes following RCW 28A.150.230.
Part headings and captions not lawSeverabilityEffective date2004 c 19: See notes following RCW 28A.655.061.
High school diplomasReceiving final transcript optional: RCW 28A.230.120.



Program to help students meet minimum entrance requirements at baccalaureate-granting institutions or to pursue career or other opportunitiesHigh school course offerings for postsecondary credit.

(1) All public high schools of the state shall provide a program, directly or in cooperation with a community college or another school district, for students whose educational plans include application for entrance to a baccalaureate-granting institution after being granted a high school diploma. The program shall help these students to meet at least the minimum entrance requirements under RCW 28B.10.050.
(2) All public high schools of the state shall provide a program, directly or in cooperation with a community or technical college, a skills [skill] center, an apprenticeship committee, or another school district, for students who plan to pursue career or work opportunities other than entrance to a baccalaureate-granting institution after being granted a high school diploma. These programs may:
(a) Help students demonstrate the application of essential academic learning requirements to the world of work, occupation-specific skills, knowledge of more than one career in a chosen pathway, and employability and leadership skills; and
(b) Help students demonstrate the knowledge and skill needed to prepare for industry certification, and/or have the opportunity to articulate to postsecondary education and training programs.
(3) Within existing resources, all public high schools in the state shall:
(a) Work towards the goal of offering a sufficient number of high school courses that give students the opportunity to earn the equivalent of a year's worth of postsecondary credit towards a certificate, apprenticeship program, technical degree, or associate or baccalaureate degree. These high school courses are those advanced courses that have accompanying proficiency exams or demonstrated competencies that are used to demonstrate postsecondary knowledge and skills; and
(b) Inform students and their families, emphasizing communication to underrepresented groups, about the program offerings and the opportunities to take courses that qualify for postsecondary credit through demonstrated competencies or if the student earns the qualifying score on the proficiency exam. This information shall encourage students to use the twelfth grade as the launch year for an advance start on their career and postsecondary education.
(4) A middle school that receives approval from the office of the superintendent of public instruction to provide a career and technical program in science, technology, engineering, or mathematics directly to students shall receive funding at the same rate as a high school operating a similar program. Additionally, a middle school that provides a hands-on experience in science, technology, engineering, or mathematics with an integrated curriculum of academic content and career and technical education, and includes a career and technical education exploratory component shall also qualify for the career and technical education funding.

NOTES:

FindingsIntent2011 c 77: "The legislature finds that approximately thirty-five percent of seniors in Washington high schools take less than a full load of classes during their senior year. The legislature further finds that many high schools provide students opportunities to take advanced courses in career and technical or academic fields that give students a head start when they begin their career or enter a technical training program or a college or university. The legislature also finds that since each individual institution of higher education adopts its own rules for awarding credit for advanced high school work, students can encounter unanticipated barriers to advancing their dreams. Students can also be discouraged from putting in that extra effort in high school if they are not certain whether their extra work will be appropriately credited toward a certificate or degree.
The legislature intends to help students progress from high school to a certificate or degree by increasing opportunities and providing a clear pathway. Twelfth grade will truly be the launch year as high schools increase the opportunities for students to take more advanced classes. In addition, this act provides for community and technical colleges and four-year institutions of higher education to publish a list of high school courses and adopt uniform scores for proficiency exams or competency requirements that will be given credit toward certificate or degree requirements." [ 2011 c 77 § 1.]
Short title2011 c 77: "This act may be known and cited as the launch year act." [ 2011 c 77 § 5.]
Effective date2009 c 212 § 2: "Section 2 of this act takes effect September 1, 2009." [ 2009 c 212 § 3.]
Finding2009 c 212: "The legislature finds that significant efforts are under way to improve mathematics and science instruction in Washington's public schools through development and adoption of new learning standards, identification of aligned curriculum, and expanded opportunities for professional development for teachers. A significant emphasis has also been made on improving career and technical education programs focused on high-demand programs. Middle schools have successfully served one thousand four hundred full-time equivalent students in career and technical programs rich in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics through a grant program. The legislature concludes that opportunities for hands-on and applied learning in these programs should be extended to middle school students on an ongoing, statewide basis so that students are prepared to take advantage of more advanced coursework in high school and postsecondary education." [ 2009 c 212 § 1.]
Effective date2007 c 396 § 14: "Section 14 of this act takes effect September 1, 2009." [ 2007 c 396 § 21.]
Expiration date2007 c 396 § 13: "Section 13 of this act expires September 1, 2009." [ 2007 c 396 § 20.]
Captions not law2007 c 396: See note following RCW 28A.305.215.
FindingIntent2007 c 396: See note following RCW 28A.188.020.
Effective date2006 c 263 § 407: "Section 407 of this act takes effect September 1, 2009." [ 2006 c 263 § 1002.]
FindingsPurposePart headings not law2006 c 263: See notes following RCW 28A.150.230.
Effective date1984 c 278: "Sections 16, 18, and 19 of this act shall take effect July 1, 1986." [ 1984 c 278 § 23.]
Severability1984 c 278: See note following RCW 28A.185.010.



United States flagProcurement, display, exercisesNational anthem.

The board of directors of every school district shall cause a United States flag being in good condition to be displayed during school hours upon or near every public school plant, except during inclement weather. They shall cause appropriate flag exercises to be held in each classroom at the beginning of the school day, and in every school at the opening of all school assemblies, at which exercises those pupils so desiring shall recite the following salute to the flag: "I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all". Students not reciting the pledge shall maintain a respectful silence. The salute to the flag or the national anthem shall be rendered immediately preceding interschool events when feasible.
[ 1981 c 130 § 1; 1969 ex.s. c 223 § 28A.02.030. Prior: (i) 1961 c 238 § 1; 1955 c 8 § 1; 1919 c 90 § 4; 1915 c 71 § 1; 1909 c 97 p 286 § 3; 1897 c 118 § 180; RRS § 4777. Formerly RCW 28.02.030. (ii) 1955 c 8 § 2; 1919 c 90 § 5; RRS § 4778. Formerly RCW 28A.02.030, 28.87.180.]

NOTES:

Display of national and state flags: RCW 1.20.015.



Temperance and Good Citizenship DayAids in programmingVoter registrationReport.

(1) On January 16th of each year or the preceding Friday when January 16th falls on a nonschool day, there shall be observed within each public school "Temperance and Good Citizenship Day." Annually the state superintendent of public instruction shall duly prepare and publish for circulation among the teachers of the state a program for use on such day embodying topics pertinent thereto and may from year to year designate particular laws for special observance.
(2) Each year on "Temperance and Good Citizenship Day," social studies teachers must, as resources allow, coordinate a voter registration event in each history or social studies class attended by high school seniors. This event is part of the future voter program. Teachers must make voter sign up and registration available to all students.
(3) County auditors may, as resources allow, help coordinate elements of the future voter program, and participate in voter registration events for students on "Temperance and Good Citizenship Day."
(4) On each temperance and good citizenship day all students who will be eighteen years of age or older by the time of the next general election will be given the opportunity to register to vote online in the classroom. Paper registration must also be made available in the classroom. Students who do not possess a state identicard or driver's license must be provided a paper registration form. The event must include adequate time for students to complete the registration process in class.
(5) The superintendent of public instruction, in consultation with the secretary of state, must update and distribute youth voter registration materials annually, by December 1st, for eligible students to register to vote at school. Electronic notification of the availability of the materials must be distributed to high school principals and secondary social studies and history teachers.
(6) The superintendent of public instruction must consult with the secretary of state to provide registration methods that enable the electronic collection of information on the number of students who registered to vote on "Temperance and Good Citizenship Day," with the goal of achieving at least fifty thousand new voter registrations for seventeen and eighteen year olds annually, beginning in January 2020.
(7) Beginning March 1, 2020, and annually thereafter, the superintendent of public instruction must report on yearly progress toward the goal established in *subsection (5) of this section, including the number of seventeen and eighteen year olds registered to vote by county and recommendations for increasing youth voter registration, to the governor and the appropriate standing committees of the legislature in accordance with RCW 43.01.036.
(8) For the purposes of this section:
(a) "Future voter program" refers to the information that may be collected by a number of processes about a future voter. Information that is otherwise disclosable under chapter 29A.08 RCW cannot be disclosed on the future voter until the person reaches age eighteen, except for the purpose of processing and delivering ballots.
(b) "Sign up" means the act of providing information relevant to eventual official voter registration, prior to such time that he or she will be eighteen years of age by the next election.
[ 2018 c 109 § 3; 1969 ex.s. c 223 § 28A.02.090. Prior: (i) 1923 c 76 § 1; RRS § 4901-1. (ii) 1923 c 76 § 2; RRS § 4901-2. Formerly RCW 28A.02.090, 28.02.090, and 28.02.095.]

NOTES:

*Reviser's note: The reference to subsection (5) appears to be erroneous. Reference to subsection (6) was apparently intended.
FindingsIntentEffective date2018 c 109: See notes following RCW 29A.08.170.



Disability history monthActivities.

Annually, during the month of October, each public school shall conduct or promote educational activities that provide instruction, awareness, and understanding of disability history and people with disabilities. The activities may include, but not be limited to, school assemblies or guest speaker presentations.

NOTES:

Short title2008 c 167: "This act may be known and cited as the disability history month act." [ 2008 c 167 § 1.]
Findings2008 c 167: "The legislature finds that annually recognizing disability history throughout our entire public educational system, from kindergarten through grade twelve and at our colleges and universities, during the month of October will help to increase awareness and understanding of the contributions that people with disabilities in our state, nation, and the world have made to our society. The legislature further finds that recognizing disability history will increase respect and promote acceptance and inclusion of people with disabilities. The legislature further finds that recognizing disability history will inspire students with disabilities to feel a greater sense of pride, reduce harassment and bullying, and help keep students with disabilities in school." [ 2008 c 167 § 2.]



Educational activities in observance of Veterans' Day.

During the school week preceding the eleventh day of November of each year, there shall be presented in each common school as defined in RCW 28A.150.020 educational activities suitable to the observance of Veterans' Day.
The responsibility for the preparation and presentation of the activities approximating at least sixty minutes total throughout the week shall be with the principal or head teacher of each school building and such program shall embrace topics tending to instill a loyalty and devotion to the institutions and laws of this state and nation.
The superintendent of public instruction and each educational service district superintendent, by advice and suggestion, shall aid in the preparation of these activities if such aid be solicited.

NOTES:

Severability1977 ex.s. c 120: See note following RCW 4.28.080.
Severability1970 ex.s. c 15: "If any provision of this 1970 amendatory act, or its application to any person or circumstance is held invalid, the remainder of the act, or the application of the provision to other persons or circumstances is not affected." [ 1970 ex.s. c 15 § 32.]
Effective date1970 ex.s. c 15 § 12: "Notwithstanding any other provision of this 1970 amendatory act, the provisions of section 12 hereof shall not take effect until January 1, 1971 and only if at such time or thereafter chapter 223, Laws of 1969 ex. sess. is effective." [ 1970 ex.s. c 15 § 13.]
Severability1969 ex.s. c 283: See note following RCW 28A.150.050.
Rights preservedSeverability1969 ex.s. c 176: See notes following RCW 28A.310.010.



Study of constitutions compulsoryRules.

The study of the Constitution of the United States and the Constitution of the state of Washington shall be a condition prerequisite to graduation from the public and private high schools of this state. The superintendent of public instruction shall provide by rule for the implementation of this section. The superintendent of public instruction may adopt a rule permitting students who meet the criteria in RCW 28A.230.122 to meet the prerequisite through noncredit-based study.

NOTES:

FindingsPurposePart headings not law2006 c 263: See notes following RCW 28A.150.230.



Civil rights education.

School districts are encouraged to prepare and conduct a program at least once a year to commemorate the history of civil rights in our nation, including providing an opportunity for students to learn about the personalities and convictions of heroes of the civil rights movement and the importance of the fundamental principle and promise of equality under our nation's Constitution.

NOTES:

Findings2011 c 44: "The legislature finds that:
(1) The civil rights movement did not begin or end with the dramatic events of the 1950s and 1960s. Since our nation's founding, ordinary citizens have struggled to fulfill America's promise of equality under the law.
(2) Heroes of the civil rights movement include those who are well known such as Thurgood Marshall, Rosa Parks, Cesar Chavez, and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. But the list of heroes also includes those who are perhaps less well known, but each of whom gave something of themselves on behalf of their fellow citizens and in defense of equality and justice.
(3) The significant milestones and fundamental principles of civil rights should be a part of every student's understanding of our nation's history. School districts should not only try to incorporate the history of civil rights into their regular curriculum at all grade levels, but should also take the opportunity to make this history come alive through the personalities and convictions of civil rights heroes." [ 2011 c 44 § 1.]



Cardiopulmonary resuscitation instruction.

(1) Each school district that operates a high school must offer instruction in cardiopulmonary resuscitation to students as provided in this section. Beginning with the 2013-14 school year, instruction in cardiopulmonary resuscitation must be included in at least one health class necessary for graduation.
(2) Instruction in cardiopulmonary resuscitation under this section must:
(a) Be an instructional program developed by the American heart association or the American red cross or be nationally recognized and based on the most current national evidence-based emergency cardiovascular care guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation;
(b) Include appropriate use of an automated external defibrillator, which may be taught by video; and
(c) Incorporate hands-on practice in addition to cognitive learning.
(3) School districts may offer the instruction in cardiopulmonary resuscitation directly or arrange for the instruction to be provided by available community-based providers. The instruction is not required to be provided by a certificated teacher. Certificated teachers providing the instruction are not required to be certified trainers of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. A student is not required to earn certification in cardiopulmonary resuscitation to successfully complete the instruction for the purposes of this section.

NOTES:

FindingsIntent2013 c 181: "The legislature finds that more than three hundred sixty thousand people in the United States experience cardiac arrest outside of a hospital every year, and only ten percent survive because the remainder do not receive timely cardiopulmonary resuscitation. When administered immediately, cardiopulmonary resuscitation doubles or triples survival rates from cardiac arrest. Sudden cardiac arrest can happen to anyone at any time. Many victims appear healthy and have no known heart disease or other risk factors. The legislature finds that schools are the hearts of our community, and preparing students to help with a sudden cardiac arrest emergency could save the life of a child, parent, or teacher. Washington state has a long-standing history of training members of the public in cardiopulmonary resuscitation with community-based training programs. The legislature finds that training students will continue the legacy of providing high quality emergency cardiac care to its citizens. Therefore, the legislature intends to create a generation of lifesavers by putting cardiopulmonary resuscitation skills in the hands of all high school graduates and providing schools with a flexible framework to prepare for an emergency." [ 2013 c 181 § 1.]



Access to campus and student information directories by official recruiting representativesInforming students of educational and career opportunities.

If the board of directors of a school district provides access to the campus and the student information directory to persons or groups which make students aware of occupational or educational options, the board shall provide access to official recruiting representatives of the job corps, peace corps, and AmeriCorps, and to official recruiting representatives of the military forces of the state and the United States for the purpose of informing students of educational and career opportunities available in the military, which must be equal to and no less than access provided to other postsecondary occupational or educational representatives. As used in this section, "access" includes, but is not limited to, the number of days provided and the type of presentation space.



Test or assessment scoresAdjustments to instructional practicesNotification to parents.

(1) If students' scores on the test or assessments under RCW 28A.655.070 indicate that students need help in identified areas, the school district shall evaluate its instructional practices and make appropriate adjustments.
(2) Each school district shall notify the parents of each student of their child's performance on the test and assessments conducted under this chapter.

NOTES:

Part headings not law1999 c 373: See note following RCW 28A.300.310.
FindingsPart headingsSeverability1992 c 141: See notes following RCW 28A.410.040.



High school and beyond plansElectronic platform.

(1) The legislature finds that fully realizing the potential of high school and beyond plans as meaningful tools for articulating and revising pathways for graduation will require additional school counselors and family coordinators. The legislature further finds that the development and implementation of an online electronic platform for high school and beyond plans will be an appropriate and supportive action that will assist students, parents and guardians, educators, and counselors as the legislature explores options for funding additional school counselors.
(2) Subject to the availability of amounts appropriated for this specific purpose, the office of the superintendent of public instruction shall facilitate the creation of a list of available electronic platforms for the high school and beyond plan. Platforms eligible to be included on the list must meet the following requirements:
(a) Enable students to create, personalize, and revise their high school and beyond plan as required by RCW 28A.230.090;
(b) Grant parents or guardians, educators, and counselors appropriate access to students' high school and beyond plans;
(c) Employ a sufficiently flexible technology that allows for subsequent modifications necessitated by statutory changes, administrative changes, or both, as well as enhancements to improve the features and functionality of the platform;
(d) Include a sample financial aid letter and a link to the financial aid calculator created in RCW 28B.77.280, at such a time as those materials are finalized;
(e) Comply with state and federal requirements for student privacy;
(f) Allow for the portability between platforms so that students moving between school districts are able to easily transfer their high school and beyond plans; and
(g) To the extent possible, include platforms in use by school districts during the 2018-19 school year.
(3) Beginning in the 2020-21 school year, each school district must ensure that an electronic high school and beyond plan platform is available to all students who are required to have a high school and beyond plan.
(4) The office of the superintendent of public instruction may adopt and revise rules as necessary to implement this section.

NOTES:

IntentConflict with federal requirements2020 c 307: See notes following RCW 28B.77.290.
Intent2019 c 252: See note following RCW 28A.655.250.



Coordination of procedures and content of assessments.

The superintendent of public instruction shall coordinate both the procedures and the content of the tests and assessments required by the state to maximize the value of the information provided to students as they progress and to teachers and parents about students' talents, interests, and academic needs or deficiencies so that appropriate programs can be provided to enhance the likelihood of students' success both in school and beyond.

NOTES:

Part headings not law1999 c 373: See note following RCW 28A.300.310.



Condensed compliance reportsSecond-class districts.

Any compliance reporting requirements as a result of laws in this chapter that apply to second-class districts may be submitted in accordance with RCW 28A.330.250.

NOTES:

Conflict with federal requirements2011 c 45: See note following RCW 28A.330.250.



Computer science.

(1) Beginning no later than the 2022-23 school year, each school district that operates a high school must, at a minimum, provide an opportunity to access an elective computer science course that is available to all high school students. School districts are encouraged to consider community-based or public-private partnerships in establishing and administering a course, but any course offered in accordance with this section must be aligned to the state learning standards for computer science or mathematics.
(2) In accordance with the requirements of this section, beginning in the 2019-20 school year, school districts may award academic credit for computer science to students based on student completion of a competency examination that is aligned with the state learning standards for computer science or mathematics and course equivalency requirements adopted by the office of the superintendent of public instruction to implement this section. Each school district board of directors in districts that award credit under this subsection shall develop a written policy for awarding such credit that includes:
(a) A course equivalency approval procedure;
(b) Procedures for awarding competency-based credit for skills learned partially or wholly outside of a course; and
(c) An approval process for computer science courses taken before attending high school under RCW 28A.230.090 (4) and (5).
(3) Prior to the use of any competency examination under this section that may be used to award academic credit to students, the office of the superintendent of public instruction must review the examination to ensure its alignment with:
(a) The state learning standards for computer science or mathematics; and
(b) Course equivalency requirements adopted by the office of the superintendent of public instruction to implement this section.

NOTES:

Findings2019 c 180: "The legislature recognizes the benefit of computer science and computational thinking in education, not only with respect to educational development, but also in cultivating the skills needed to compete and excel in our state's career landscape. By providing more opportunities to take courses and earn credit in computer science, Washington can better prepare students to excel both in school and after graduation." [ 2019 c 180 § 1.]



Financial aid advising day.

(1)(a) Beginning with the 2020-21 school year, all school districts with a high school must provide a financial aid advising day, as defined in RCW 28A.300.815.
(b) Districts must provide both a financial aid advising day and notification of financial aid opportunities at the beginning of each school year to parents and guardians of any student entering the twelfth grade. The notification must include information regarding:
(i) The eligibility requirements of the Washington college grant;
(ii) The requirements of the financial aid advising day;
(iii) The process for opting out of the financial aid advising day; and
(iv) Any community-based resources available to assist parents and guardians in understanding the requirements of and how to complete the free application for federal student aid and the Washington application for state financial aid.
(2) Districts may administer the financial aid advising day, as defined in RCW 28A.300.815, in accordance with information-sharing requirements set in the high school and beyond plan in RCW 28A.230.090.
(3) The Washington state school directors' association, with assistance from the office of the superintendent of public instruction and the Washington student achievement council, shall develop a model policy and procedure that school district board of directors may adopt. The model policy and procedure must describe minimum standards for a financial aid advising day as defined in RCW 28A.300.815.
(4) School districts are encouraged to engage in the Washington student achievement council's financial aid advising training.
(5) The office of the superintendent of public instruction may adopt rules for the implementation of this section.

NOTES:

IntentConflict with federal requirements2020 c 307: See notes following RCW 28B.77.290.