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181-78A-264  <<  181-78A-270 >>   181-78A-272

WAC 181-78A-270

Agency filings affecting this section

Approval standardKnowledge and skills.

Each preparation program must be in compliance with the program approval standards of WAC 181-78A-220(5):
(1) TEACHER RESIDENCY CERTIFICATION.
(a) EFFECTIVE TEACHING.
(i) Using multiple instructional strategies, including the principles of second language acquisition, to address student academic language ability levels and cultural and linguistic backgrounds;
(ii) Applying principles of differentiated instruction, including theories of language acquisition, stages of language, and academic language development, in the integration of subject matter across the content areas of reading, mathematical, scientific, and aesthetic reasoning;
(iii) Using standards-based assessment that is systematically analyzed using multiple formative, summative, and self-assessment strategies to monitor and improve instruction;
(iv) Implementing classroom/school centered instruction, including sheltered instruction that is connected to communities within the classroom and the school, and includes knowledge and skills for working with other;
(v) Planning and/or adapting standards-based curricula that are personalized to the diverse needs of each student;
(vi) Aligning instruction to the learning standards and outcomes so all students know the learning targets and their progress toward meeting them;
(vii) Planning and/or adapting curricula that are standards driven so students develop understanding and problem-solving expertise in the content area(s) using reading, written and oral communication, and technology;
(viii) Preparing students to be responsible citizens for an environmentally sustainable, globally interconnected, and diverse society;
(ix) Planning and/or adapting learner centered curricula that engage students in a variety of culturally responsive, developmentally, and age appropriate strategies;
(x) Using technology that is effectively integrated to create technologically proficient learners; and
(xi) Informing, involving, and collaborating with families/neighborhoods, and communities in each student's educational process, including using information about student cultural identity, achievement and performance.
(b) PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT. Developing reflective, collaborative, professional growth-centered practices through regularly evaluating the effects of his/her teaching through feedback and reflection.
Teacher evaluation. After August 31, 2013, an approved preparation program for teachers shall require candidates for a residency certificate to demonstrate knowledge of teacher evaluation research and Washington's evaluation requirements. At a minimum, teacher preparation programs must address the following knowledge and skills related to evaluations:
(i) Examination of Washington's evaluation requirements, criteria, four-tiered performance rating system, and the preferred instructional frameworks used to describe the evaluation criteria;
(ii) Self-assessment, goal setting, and reflective practices;
(iii) Evidence gathering over time;
(iv) Use of student growth data and multiple measures of performance;
(v) Evaluation conferencing; and
(vi) Use of an online tool to review observation notes and submit materials to be included in evaluation.
(c) TEACHING AS A PROFESSION.
(i) Participating collaboratively and professionally in school activities and using appropriate and respectful verbal and written communication.
(ii) Demonstrating knowledge of professional, legal, and ethical responsibilities and policies.
(d) PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT. An approved preparation program for teachers shall require that each candidate engage in an assessment process approved by the professional educator standards board. The assessment will verify that the candidate for a residency teacher certificate can meet the teacher standards in (a), (b) and (c) of this subsection and understands teacher impact on student learning. Beginning January 1, 2014, all candidates will complete and pass the teacher performance assessment per WAC 181-78A-264 as authorized by the professional educator standards board: Provided, that candidates who participated in the teacher performance assessment field trials or took the pedagogy assessment prior to January 1, 2014, may be recommended for certification by the preparation program. All candidates shall exit the residency certificate program with a draft professional growth plan oriented toward the expectations for the professional certificate.
(2) PRINCIPAL AND PROGRAM ADMINISTRATOR.
(a) Principal and program administrator candidates, in order to support student achievement of the state learning goals and essential academic learning requirements, will complete formalized learning opportunities, including an internship, in an approved program that includes:
Successful demonstration of standards.
(i) A school or program administrator is an educational leader who has the knowledge, skills, and cultural competence to improve learning and achievement to ensure the success of each student by leading the development, articulation, implementation, and stewardship of a vision of learning that is shared and supported by school/program and community stakeholders;
(ii) A school or program administrator is an educational leader who has the knowledge, skills, and cultural competence to improve learning and achievement to ensure the success of each student by leading through advocating, nurturing, and sustaining district/school/program cultures and coherent instructional programs that are conducive to student learning and staff professional growth;
(iii) A school or program administrator is an educational leader who has the knowledge, skills, and cultural competence to improve learning and achievement to ensure the success of each student by ensuring management of the organization, operations, and resources for a safe, efficient, and effective learning environment;
(iv) A school or program administrator is an educational leader who has the knowledge, skills, and cultural competence to improve learning and achievement to ensure the success of each student by collaborating with families and community members, responding to diverse community interests and needs, and mobilizing community resources;
(v) A school or program administrator is an educational leader who has the knowledge, skills, and cultural competence to improve learning and achievement to ensure the success of each student by acting with integrity, fairness, and in an ethical manner; and
(vi) A school or program administrator is an educational leader who has the knowledge, skills, and cultural competence to improve learning and achievement to ensure the success of each student by understanding, responding to, and influencing the larger political, social, economic, legal and cultural context.
(b) Performance assessment. An approved preparation program for principals shall require that each candidate engage in an assessment process using the standards-based benchmarks approved by the professional educator standards board. The benchmarks may not be changed without prior professional educator standards board approval. All candidates shall exit the residency certificate program with a draft professional growth plan oriented toward the expectations for the professional certificate.
(c) Teacher and principal evaluation. After August 31, 2013, an approved preparation program for principals shall require candidates for a residency principal certificate to demonstrate knowledge of teacher evaluation research, Washington's evaluation requirements, and successfully complete opportunities to practice teacher evaluation skills. At a minimum, principal preparation programs must address the following knowledge and skills related to evaluations:
(i) Examination of Washington teacher and principal evaluation criteria, four-tiered performance rating system, and the preferred instructional and leadership frameworks used to describe the evaluation criteria;
(ii) Self-assessment, goal setting, and reflective practices;
(iii) Evidence gathering over time;
(iv) Classroom observation skills;
(v) Bias training;
(vi) Rater agreement on the four-tiered system;
(vii) Use of student growth data and multiple measures of performance;
(viii) Evaluation conferencing;
(ix) Development of classroom teacher and principal support plans resulting from an evaluation; and
(x) Use of an online tool to manage the collection of observation notes, teacher- and principal-submitted materials, and other information related to the conduct of the evaluation.
(3) SUPERINTENDENT. An approved preparation program for superintendents shall require the candidate to demonstrate in course work and the internship the following standards:
(a) A superintendent is the community's educational leader who has the knowledge, skills, and cultural competence to improve learning and achievement to ensure the success of each student by leading the development, articulation, implementation, and stewardship of a vision of learning that is shared and supported by district and community stakeholders;
(b) A superintendent is the community's educational leader who has the knowledge, skills, and cultural competence to improve learning and achievement to ensure the success of each student by leading through advocating, nurturing, and sustaining district culture and coherent instructional programs that are conducive to student learning and staff professional growth;
(c) A superintendent is the community's educational leader who has the knowledge, skills, and cultural competence to improve learning and achievement to ensure the success of each student by ensuring management of the organization, operations, and resources for a safe, efficient, and effective learning environment;
(d) A superintendent is the community's educational leader who has the knowledge, skills, and cultural competence to improve learning and achievement to ensure the success of each student by collaborating with families and community members, responding to diverse community interests and needs, and mobilizing community resources;
(e) A superintendent is the community's educational leader who has the knowledge, skills, and cultural competence to improve learning and achievement to ensure the success of each student by acting with integrity, fairness, and in an ethical manner;
(f) A superintendent is the community's educational leader who has the knowledge, skills, and cultural competence to improve learning and achievement to ensure the success of each student by understanding, responding to, and influencing the larger political, social, economic, legal, and cultural context; and
(g) Principal evaluation. After August 31, 2013, an approved preparation program for superintendents shall require candidates for an initial superintendent certificate to demonstrate knowledge of principal evaluation research, Washington's evaluation requirements, and successfully complete opportunities to practice principal evaluation skills. At a minimum, superintendent preparation programs must address the following knowledge and skills related to evaluations:
(i) Examination of Washington principal evaluation criteria, four-tiered performance rating system, and the preferred leadership frameworks used to describe the evaluation criteria;
(ii) Self-assessment, goal setting, and reflective practices;
(iii) Evidence gathering over time;
(iv) Observation skills;
(v) Bias training;
(vi) Rater agreement on the four-tiered system;
(vii) Use of student growth data and multiple measures of performance;
(viii) Evaluation conferencing;
(ix) Development of principal support plans resulting from an evaluation; and
(x) Use of an online tool to manage the collection of observation notes, superintendent- and principal-submitted materials, and other information related to the conduct of the evaluation.
(4) SCHOOL COUNSELOR. School counselor candidates, in order to support student achievement of the state learning goals and essential academic learning requirements, will complete formalized learning opportunities, including an internship, in an approved program that includes:
(a) Successful demonstration of standards:
(i) School counseling program: Certified school counselors develop, lead, and evaluate a data-driven school counseling program that is comprehensive, utilizes best practices, and advances the mission of the school.
(ii) Student learning and assessments: Certified school counselors use their knowledge of pedagogy, child development, individual differences, learning barriers, and Washington state learning requirements to support student learning. They work effectively with other educators to monitor and improve student success.
(iii) Counseling theories and technique: Certified school counselors use a variety of research-based counseling approaches to provide prevention, intervention, and responsive services to meet the academic, personal/social and career needs of all students.
(iv) Equity, fairness, and diversity: Certified school counselors understand cultural contexts in a multicultural society, demonstrate fairness, equity, and sensitivity to every student, and advocate for equitable access to instructional programs and activities.
(v) School climate and collaboration: Certified school counselors collaborate with colleagues, families, and community members to establish and foster a safe, inclusive, and nurturing learning environment for students, staff, and families.
(vi) Professional identity and ethical practice: Certified school counselors engage in continuous professional growth and development and advocate for appropriate school counselor identity and roles. They adhere to ethical practices and to the Washington state and federal policies, laws, and legislation relevant to school counseling.
(b) Performance assessment. An approved preparation program for school counselors shall require that each candidate engage in an assessment process using the standards-based benchmarks approved by the professional educator standards board. The benchmarks may not be changed without prior professional educator standards board approval. All candidates shall exit the residency certificate program with a draft professional growth plan oriented to the expectations for the professional certificate.
(5) SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGIST. School psychologist candidates will complete formalized learning opportunities, including an internship, in an approved program that includes:
(a) Successful demonstration of standards:
(i) Data-based decision making and accountability: Certified school psychologists have knowledge of varied models and methods of assessment as part of a systematic process of data-based decision making that permeates every aspect of professional practice.
(ii) Consultation and collaboration: Certified school psychologists have knowledge of behavioral, mental health, collaborative, and other consultation models and methods and of their application to individual and contextual situations; collaborate effectively with others in planning and decision-making processes at the individual, group, and system levels.
(iii) Interventions and instructional support to develop academic skills: Certified school psychologists have knowledge of the influence of biological, cultural, linguistic, and early life experiences on academic development and collaborate with others to access, implement, and evaluate services at universal, targeted, and intensive levels using a variety of culturally and developmentally appropriate assessments.
(iv) Interventions and mental health services to develop social and life skills: Certified school psychologists have knowledge of biological, cultural, developmental, and social influences on behavior and mental health; collaborate with others, to develop, implement, and evaluate services that support socialization, cultural competence, learning, and mental health for positive impact on student learning.
(v) Schoolwide practices to promote learning: Certified school psychologists have knowledge of general and special education, evidence-based practices, and equity pedagogy that responds to the needs of the learners; demonstrate skills to manage time effectively, respond to the learning needs of the individual students, and plan and measure positive impact on student learning.
(vi) Prevention and responsive services: Certified school psychologists have knowledge of principles of resilience and risk factors and demonstrate skills in multitiered delivery of services that respond to crisis and promote learning and mental health across cultures.
(vii) School collaboration services: Certified school psychologists have knowledge of family systems, including family strengths and influences on student development, learning, and behavior, and of methods to involve families in education and service delivery; facilitate family and school partnerships and interactions with community agencies for enhancement of academic and social-behavior outcomes for children.
(viii) Diversity in development and learning: Certified school psychologists have knowledge of the principles and research related to culture, linguistic development, context, individual and role differences; work collaboratively to provide professional services that respond to the diverse needs of individuals and families; advocate for social justice and equity pedagogy.
(ix) Research and program evaluation: Certified school psychologists have knowledge of research, statistics, and evaluation methods; evaluate research, translate research into practice, and understand research design and statistics in sufficient depth to plan and conduct investigations and program evaluations for improvement of services at individual, group, and systems levels.
(x) Legal, ethical, and professional practice: Certified school psychologists have knowledge of the history and foundations of their profession; of multiple service models and methods; of ethical, professional, and legal standards, including the Washington Administrative Code and federal and state accountability legislation; practice in ways that are consistent with applicable standards; engage in responsive ethical and professional decision-making; and apply professional work characteristics.
(xi) Emerging and assistive technologies: Certified school psychologists have knowledge of and access, implement, and evaluate technology relevant to their work and to the instructional needs of individuals with disabilities.
(b) Performance assessment. An approved preparation program for school psychologists shall require that each candidate engage in an assessment process using the standards-based benchmarks approved by the professional educator standards board. The benchmarks may not be changed without prior professional educator standards board approval. All candidates shall exit the residency certificate program with a draft professional growth plan oriented to the expectations for the professional certificate.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 28A.410.210. WSR 14-07-067, § 181-78A-270, filed 3/17/14, effective 4/17/14; WSR 13-16-076, § 181-78A-270, filed 8/6/13, effective 9/6/13; WSR 12-18-004, § 181-78A-270, filed 8/23/12, effective 9/23/12; WSR 12-04-036, § 181-78A-270, filed 1/27/12, effective 2/27/12; WSR 11-15-049, § 181-78A-270, filed 7/15/11, effective 8/15/11. Statutory Authority: RCW 28A.410.210 and 2009 c 548, 2010 c 235, 2009 c 128 [2009 c 468]. WSR 10-17-029, § 181-78A-270, filed 8/9/10, effective 9/9/10. Statutory Authority: RCW 28A.410.210. WSR 07-23-046, § 181-78A-270, filed 11/14/07, effective 12/15/07; WSR 06-14-010, § 181-78A-270, filed 6/22/06, effective 7/23/06. WSR 06-02-051, recodified as § 181-78A-270, filed 12/29/05, effective 1/1/06. Statutory Authority: RCW 28A.401.010 [28A.410.010]. WSR 04-21-038, § 180-78A-270, filed 10/15/04, effective 11/15/04. Statutory Authority: RCW 28A.410.010. WSR 04-04-089, § 180-78A-270, filed 2/3/04, effective 3/5/04. Statutory Authority: RCW 28A.305.130 and 28A.410.010. WSR 02-18-037, § 180-78A-270, filed 8/26/02, effective 9/26/02. Statutory Authority: RCW 28A.410.010 and 28A.305.130 (1) through (4). WSR 02-04-018, § 180-78A-270, filed 1/24/02, effective 2/24/02. Statutory Authority: RCW 28A.410.010 and 28A.305.130 (1) and (2). WSR 99-23-023, § 180-78A-270, filed 11/9/99, effective 12/10/99. Statutory Authority: RCW 28A.305.130 (1) and (2), 28A.410.010 and 28A.150.220(4). WSR 99-01-174, § 180-78A-270, filed 12/23/98, effective 1/23/99.]